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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Time Gone By – A browse through the archives of the Connacht Tribune.

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1913

Cowardly assault

While peacefully returning from a funeral on Sunday, a Carnmore farmer named John Carr, was set upon by three other men and assaulted in a grievous manner.

It appears Carr and his wife attended a funeral to Lackagh early on Sunday. When returning through Claregalway, Carr entered Lenihan’s public house, presumably for refreshment, leaving his wife in charge of the horse outside.

When he came out and was proceeding on his homeward journey, three farmers assaulted him with hurleys, causing several scalp wounds and injuries to the back.

The injured man lies in a precarious condition at his residence in Carnmore, and Dr. Gannon is in constant attendance. When examined, the scalp wounds showed that considerable force must have been used, as the doctor found it necessary to insert six stitches in his head.

At the time of writing, the doctor has not certified that the man’s life is out of danger. Eye-witnesses’ description of the scene of the assault go to show that the attack was a very brutal one, the road for a couple of yards being covered with blood.

1938

Nursing exams

Dr. Mills, R.M.S., informed the Committee of Management,. Ballinasloe Mental Hospital, that although there were very few vacancies, and a waiting list at present, 173 girls from all over Counties Galway and Roscommon sat for the qualifying examination for nurses held at the Mental Hospital a fortnight ago.

Of the 173, 66 passed.  This, said the chairman, only showed the need for employment in the country, and to relieve this to some extent, the committee called on all attendants, twelve in all, who have served the full period of 33 years entitling them to a maximum pension, to retire.

The committee took this step, said the chairman in order to relieve to some small extent the present pressing unemployment problem in the two counties.

Taking in probationers at £40 per annum and granting pensions to those who will retire on full pensions will mean no extra cost on the committee’s pay-roll.

The difference between the present rate of pay of those attendants qualified to retire and the amount of their pensions will almost pay the salaries of the probationers who replace the pensioners, while at the same time it will open up new posts.

Gaeltacht industry

That the market for goods manufactured for sale by the Gaeltacht Industries depot in Dublin is strengthening and that the people are learning to appreciate the high quality of these goods is evidenced by the fact that orders for the manufacture of certain articles of wearing apparel are coming in more frequently to many of the manufacturing stations.

The increased demand has given a decided fillip to the Roundstone knitting and crochet industry. This station, which employs twenty-six girls under the charge of Miss McGee, is working full time to cope with the demand.

The “Buy Irish” programme launched some time ago and the application of tariffs on foreign-manufactured goods coming into the country have done a great deal to draw the attention of the people to the Irish manufactured article, and now that Gaeltacht Industry goods are coming into the limelight their superior quality will assure them a steady market even in competition with mass-production goods.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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Rev Fr Raymond Watters O.P recites a decade of the rosary as the rain begins to pour down during the Blessing of Galway Bay on August 15, 1882.

1922

Dawn surrender

National troops operating from Galway and Athenry at dawn on Wednesday morning surrounded an area about four miles between Liscananaun village and Aucloggeen, on the eastern side of the Corrib, and after a smart movement captured nineteen irregulars, with their officers, twenty-two service and Mauser rifles, a number of service revolvers and automatics, and considerable quantities of ammunition for bombs.

The National troops were under command of Co-Commandant Austin Brennan, O.C., Galway area, and the various battalion and company officers, and the plan to surround these villages, which lie in a marshy waste between the Curragh Line, or Galway-Headford road, and the main road from Galway to Tuam, was evolved after information had been received that a number of irregulars were quartered there, and were commandeering sheep and foodstuffs from people in surrounding districts.

Slowly and silently, accompanied by a Lancia armoured car on which machine guns were mounted, the National troops moved out from Galway shortly before two a.m. on Wednesday. One column took the Galway to Headford road, the other taking the Tuam road.

The column operating on the Headford road swung to the right beyond the Cregg river, taking the road to Drumgriffin. By dawn they had taken up extended formation in the woods around Cregg Castle, and this formed a trap into which the irregulars were subsequently driven.

Trade unions position

Mr. Cathal O’Shannon, T.D., in his presidential address at the Trade Union Congress on Monday, declare that organised Labour was separate from and independent of any political party, and would take no dictation from any quarter outside its own ranks.

He strongly protested against militarism, from whatever quarter it came, and condemned the political censorship of thought and opinion, the ignoring of laws relating to the custody of prisoners, the existence of a semi-military police force, and the propaganda on both sides.

The present conflict or strife, he declared, was unnecessary and counselled the Irish workers to keep aloof from it.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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A winner at Ballybrit in July 1964 is led back by its owner and connections.

1922

Civil War impact

Had Ireland enjoyed the blessings of peace this year, the summer and autumn of 1922 would have stood out in our annals as a period when we had entered upon the first stages of real prosperity and welcomed the Irish from overseas to the shores of a free land.

Thousands of Americans came in the earlier part of the season. They had wallets full of money, which they were willing and anxious to spend amongst the people of their own land. To their dismay and keen disappointment, they found Ireland in a state of war.

A holiday in the ordinary sense was out of the question. Many of them turned to the highlands of Scotland; others went to Oberammergau, and other parts of the Continent; some turned westward again.

The daily Press has been full of the impressions of these visitors. Some of them had gone through experiences which tinged these impressions with rankling bitterness. We can imagine what they will say when they return home!

Ireland has lost by this fratricidal strife morally as well as materially, and the tragedy is that the loss has yet to be fully accounted, and that it comes upon a nation that has just secured its freedom after a struggle of centuries and at a time when we need all the wealth and work we can secure for national reconstruction.

It is now a matter of doubt whether Galway race meeting can be held this year, as those interested are not keen on courting a failure that would lower the prestige that Ballybrit has won.

Wait goes on for light

The proposed scheme for electric lighting of the town of Athenry has been temporarily postponed owing to the present condition of the country. The proposed capital was to be £3,000, £2,100 of which was to be subscribed by seven directors, while the rest was to be got from shareholders. It is expected that the project will be re-mooted as soon as opportunity offers.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

 

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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Taking it all in at the Galway Races in 1964.

1922

Economic war

The Irish Minister for Local Government has issued letter to each parish priest and public representative calling attention to the fact that the operators of the irregulars assume more and more distinctly the character of war upon the economic life of the Irish people. Bridges are being broken and roads obstructed all over the country.

In many places the railways have been cut and traffic interrupted. Within the last few days sections of the canals have been drained off. Mr. Cosgrove says that these acts do not prevent the progress of National troops, do not even seriously impede the transport of military supplies.

They are effective only against the civilian population, preventing the proper distribution of flour, foodstuffs, causing generally great hardship and, in some cases, actual starvation; hindering the dispatch of livestock and farm produce into the customary markets and inflicting losses on the agricultural community.

The Minister goes on to point out the unemployment stagnation, and cumulative distress that must follow such acts, and declares that the economic weapon is being used to force the people to reject the Treaty and enter upon a hopeless and unnecessary war with England.

Gaelic revival 

If Ireland be wise, and her sons do not throw her back into a whirl of chaos and anarchy and lay her once more an easy prey to conquest, the Gaelic revival is assured within the lifetime of the present generation.

Our children will soon be using their own tongue as the medium of learning the arts and sciences: though it will be disclosed to them the knowledge of other peoples and lands, and of the things that concern their own.

Our Gaelic contribution on page two this week is an inspiring study. Apart from the material aspect that 560 teachers studying at local centres have in small measure compensated for the loss of the races, the fact has emerged that Galway can become the greatest centre of Gaelic culture in Ireland.

The ceilidhthe and scoraidheachta held at various centres have been the wonder and delight of our visitors, some of whom have come from the Capital of the “Black North” to learn their mother tongue at its fountain head.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

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