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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Time Gone By – A browse through the archives of the Connacht Tribune.

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1913

The Galway Buffer

At Galway Petty Sessions, Constable O’Leary had John Melia and John McDonogh summoned for being drunk and disorderly in Mainguard-street on the 4th inst. Complainant said the two defendants were going to beat a little man. Melia was the worst of the two.

Chairman, Mr W. H. Hill, R.M.: Did the little man give a good account of himself?

Complainant: No, your worship, he was trying to get away from them (laughter).

Melia told the Bench that a man named Ward followed McDonogh and himself into a public house and demanded a drink from them. They refused to give him the drink, and the latter followed them on the street for the purpose of getting drink.

The Chairman said they had decided to fine McDonogh 2s. 6d. Addressing Melia, he said: “If you think yourself a Galway ‘buffer’, and a jolly good drinker, let me tell you that if you knock about long enough, you will get a man not half your size that will knock you into the middle of next summer (laughter). Defendant was fined 10s. and costs.

1938

Grim discovery

There is intense garda activity in Oranmore and the surrounding districts following the discovery of a portion of the body of an infant child at Blackweir, Oranmore. The grim discovery was made on Wednesday night by Luke Monaghan, while walking near the foreshore at Blackweir, concealed in a heap of straw near the back yard of his house.

The foreshore and neighbouring fields, some of which contain dense undergrowth, are being thoroughly searched, but as yet have failed to reveal any further clues to this mystery, which has shocked the whole of the West of Ireland.

An inquest opened on Thursday, and Dr Sean Tubridy said it was impossible to say whether the child was male or female.

He could not say if the severance was caused by an instrument, but he was inclined to the view that it was. The body was in an advanced stage of decomposition and, in witness’s opinion, was some weeks dead.

There was no means of ascertaining the age of the chid or the cause of death.

Heavy rain and storms

Winter arrived according to schedule in Connemara last week and the putting back of the clock seemed to have been the signal for a general onslaught by the elements.

There were heavy rains and storms on Saturday night, with consequent losses of hay and oat crops to farmers over a large area. Trees were felled across the road at Arbeare, Kilmilkin, Kylemore and on the Sky Road, Clifden.

The storm abated somewhat on Sunday, but it again gathered gale force on Monday and on Monday night, Connemara experienced one of the severest gales in many years. Towards midnight the wind rose to a speed of about ninety miles per hour and blew from the north-east.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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Student musicians who took part in the Dominican College, Taylor's Hill production of My Fair Lady in January 1998.

1923

Influenza cure

Of the ills to which human flesh is heir, those which result from the periodical influenza epidemic are, perhaps, the most devastating.

The toll of human life in the great epidemic of 1918-’19 was unparalleled in the more recent history of the world. It is calculated that in the twelve months the epidemic claimed more victims than fell in the four-and-a-half years of the European war.

In Ireland the disease was no respecter of persons, the flower of the race falling an easy prey to the germ. Indeed, it is rather a remarkable fact that it was amongst the young manhood and womanhood of the country that the ravages of the disease were greatest.

This week the welcome news has been published that the bacteriologists at the Rockefeller Institute, New York, have isolated the influenza germ, and that the cure of the disease is in sight.

The discovery of the germ itself is of inestimable importance for the welfare of humanity and augurs the possibly of influenza being made a preventable disease like smallpox in, it is to be hoped, the not far distant future.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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Orla McArdle, Leonie Ryan, Maeve Lohan, Sinéad Armstrong, Maria Lyons and Paul Ryan who were taking part in the Coláiste Iognáid production of 'Joseph' in the Jesuit Hall, Sea Road on February 5, 1991.

1923

Training ex-soldiers

A meeting of the committee of Galway Technical Institute was held on Tuesday, Mr. Eraut presiding.

The secretary, Dr. Webb, stated that there was a deputation outside from the Galway Carpenters’ Society in reference to the offer made by the Ministry of Labour to the committee to have up to 100 ex-soldiers trained in the institute in various crafts from joinery to thatching houses and making tin cans.

The difficulty he foresaw in regard to the scheme was to train maimed ex-solders and for this the Ministry of Labour was willing to give the committee 15s. per head per week. It was a money-making scheme so far as that committee was concerned, and would result in bringing a good deal of money into the city, because there would also be certain allowances for the wives and dependents.

He estimated that it would mean something like £200 or £300 per week. It was a question for the committee whether they would provide these classes. He had inquired from an authoritative source whether the training of these men would be likely to interfere with the employment of the recognised carpenter, and he was informed in the negative.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

 

 

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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Taking part in the West of Ireland Bridge Congress at UCG in April 1983 were Phil Carey, Newcastle, Eileen Murphy, Taylor's Hill, Carmel Howard, Cross Street and Claire Burke, Salthill. This year’s Bridge Congress is taking place next week at the Ardilaun Hotel from February 3 to February 5.

1923

Islanders’ distress

A correspondent sends authentic particulars of distress prevailing in the Islands of Aran. There is extreme poverty in Inishmore, especially in Killeany; large numbers in the village are on the verge of starvation, kept alive by the charity of neighbours, with scarcely a healthy child amongst them.

The people own no land, notwithstanding that the Congested Districts Board has a large tract; they fish and labour when the former is profitable or practicable and when the work can be found. To-day they are without either.

Similar stories come from other island villages. Yet last October Mr. Blythe stated in the Dáil that £1,000 had been granted for the relief of distress on the islands. The money was placed at the disposal of the Galway Rural District Council, which refused to have anything to do with the scheme.

Accordingly, the grant was never made. It is alleged that the inhabitants of Inishmore have refused to pay rates, but islanders state in reply that rates were not collected for some two years, nor were demand notes issued. The whole position is so grave that it should be looked into without further delay, and we understand that all the circumstances have been referred to Deputy O’Connell for this purpose.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

 

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