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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Time Gone By – A browse through the archives of the Connacht Tribune

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1913

Pickpocket arrested

Const. F. McCarthy is to be congratulated for his clever capture of a pickpocket on Saturday. It is alleged that a woman named Mrs. Leech missed a half-sovereign, and reported the fact to the constable.

Shortly afterwards, another woman made a similar report, the amount in the second case being 8s. The constable quickly investigated the matter, and in a short time secured the arrest of apparently an innocent woman, who threatened him with facial disfigurement. After being searched, the sums mentioned were discovered on her person.

Threatened eviction

On Monday last, the Congested District Board’s Engineer, accompanied by Head-Constable Scully, Mountbellew, and Sergt. Coyne, and a posse of ten police, with the sheriff’s bailiff, from Ballinasloe and his assistant, visited the house of a woman in Rushestown, for the purpose of taking over possession on foot of a decree for rent and arrears due.

It appears that no rent had been paid on foot of this dwellinghouse for a number of years, and that the case had several times been before the Judge at Quarter Sessions. The house is an old tumbledown one, on the estate purchased by the C.D.B.

Amidst much wailings and lamentations, the eviction was actually being proceeded with, when the amount of the decree, something over £20, was paid up.

1938

Wanted man arrested

Smart work on the part of Galway Gardaí resulted in the arrest in Galway on Thursday of John Edwards, Middleton Junction, Middleton, who was “wanted” by the Rochdale police on a charge of fraudulently converting the sum of £181 8s.

The Galway Gardaí immediately got into touch with the Lancashire police, who sent Sergeant Orgill over to take Edwards back to England. Sergeant Orgill left Galway with his prisoner on Saturday morning.

Strenuous training

The eyes of all followers of Gaelic games will be on Galway and Kerry next Sunday, when the senior footballers of these two counties will meet in the All-Ireland final at Croke Park, Dublin.

Despite the fact that the attendance at the All-Ireland hurling final was down this year as compared with the past few years, it is virtually certain that the attendance on Sunday will create a new record for the National Stadium.

G.A.A. followers in the West are confident of Galway’s ability to take the title from the Kingdom men this year, and there are some grounds for that optimism.

Galway has a splendid defence, and there is no reason to doubt their ability at centre field. The only vexing question is the ability of the Galway forwards to penetrate these powerful Kerry back lines.

Galway forwards were not as effective as they should have been against Monaghan in the semi-final. Of course, the western champions had control of the game from the start, but their followers had hoped to see a display that would inspire more confidence in the attackers.

It will be remembered that when Galway met Kerry in the League at Galway some months ago, a displeasing feature of the game was the erratic shooting of the Galway forwards. The Kerry forwards were well held for most of the hour, and the Kingdom secured victory by reason of Galway’s forward weakness.

It is hoped that this defect will not characterise the Galway team on Sunday. With the Galway forwards playing good football and shooting accurately, it would be difficult to understand how Bill Kimmerk and his men could hold the western champions.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

 

Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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A little girl celebrates Sarsfields’ success in the County Hurling Final in 1997.

1922

The ‘pay-nobodies’

The righteous wrath of members of Galway County Council very properly manifested itself against the “pay nobodies” at the meeting on Saturday last.

“I am quite satisfied,” declared Dr. Walsh, “that numbers of people who defend the policy of not paying rates are thoroughly dishonest.”

Mr. Kennedy said the policy to-day was to pay nobody and the people who were in debt themselves “wanted everybody else to be in the same position”.

Mr. Tierney invoked the dictum of the Irish Hierarchy in regard to the payment of just and lawful debts. Verily, “there are greater thieves than Cacus” – men who have such noble and patriotic notions that, to their mind, national freedom is synonymous with freedom from just and lawful obligations. It is time the people paid their rates and debts and gave up their outworn cant.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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Oil-covered swans being rescued for cleaning from the water at the Claddagh following an oil spill into the River Corrib in March 2001. A spillage upstream reached the Claddagh Basin and dozens of swans had to be removed to a sanctuary for safe keeping. About 20 swans were so contaminated that they either died or had to be put down.

1922

Temperance club

A long-felt want in Galway has been supplied this week by the opening on Monday night of the temperance club in the Columban Hall.

The club, which will be carried on under the committee of the Pioneer Association, is not confined exclusively to pioneers, but will be open to persons who have a pledge against the use of alcoholic drinks.

There will be an entrance fee of 2s. and a nominal payment for members of 6d. a month will be required to pay expenses. It is intended to provide games, etc., on the premises and in the near future to organise concerts, debates, conversazione, etc.

Rev. Father Stapleton, director of the Pioneer Association, is interesting himself in the club, and those who know the kindly soggarth aroon’s organising capacity have no doubt as to the future success of the club.

Those desirous of joining should call at the hall any night during the week between the hours of 7 and 10.30 p.m.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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Angela O'Keefe, Chairwoman of Music for Galway, pictured with a £16,000 Steinway grand piano just after it was delivered to University College Galway, ahead of its assembly in the Aula Maxima. Music for Galway fundraised to buy the piano which had to be transported from London after its purchase.

1922

Tackling drink

The International Congress on Prohibition sitting in Brussels reports that the liquor problem is substantially the same everywhere. In Ireland at present alcoholism has for us a tragic interest.

At no period in Irish history has there been so great a consumption of alcoholic liquors. Prohibition, even if it were practicable, would not solve the problem. America has taught us that lesson.

Scarcely a week passes that the American hospital registers do not record the death from alcoholic poisoning on a scale unprecedented before the country went “dry”.

The drink problem will never be successfully tackled in Ireland until such time as the public cooperate with the authorities in a rigid enforcement of the licensing laws and the drunkard is regarded as a pariah in a respectable community.

In this connection the announcement made at the last Galway parish court that persons found guilty of illicit distillation will be sent to jail without the option of a fine will be welcomed.

This is a step in the right direction and should act as a deterrent to people at present engaged in a traffic which is slowly poisoning the lives, in the moral as well as the physical sense, of large numbers of our people in outlying portions of the country.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

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