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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Time Gone By – A browse through the archives of the Connacht Tribune.

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1913

Church roof set to collapse

The Church of St. Cummin, Oughterard, which is nearly 100 years old, situated in a very poor district in Connemara, is in immediate need of substantial renovation and enlargement. This has been a matter of deep concern to priests and people for many years past, and the time has now arrived when this essential work can no longer be deferred.

An eminent architect, after careful examination of the building, discovered that the roof is liable to collapse at any moment, and should this happen during the celebration of Holy Mass, the dreadful results of such a calamity may well be conceived.

No street lights

In a letter to Ballinasloe Urban Council, ratepayers said: “We, the undersigned, being ratepayers who reside in the west of this town, regret to notice that the lighting of the street lamps in this district are (judging from the past few weeks) to be left unlighted, similar to last winter.

“We now beg to lay the fact before you and your Board, with a view to having the matter remedied. The road from the Union to the railway station has, on several occasions, been left in total darkness. Being large ratepayers, we expect equal treatment with the rest of the town.

“No doubt it may be put forward that there was a moon on the nights in question; if so, it was not above the horizon between the hours of sunset and 11 o’clock, p.m., the road being in total darkness.

“We would also call your attention to the fact that the same road has never been watered beyond the Convent; in consequence, during the past summer, we have lived in a perpetual atmosphere of dust.”

1938

Mayoral chain blessed

Ald. Joseph F. Costello, Mayor of Galway’s recently restored Corporation, knelt in the sanctuary of St. Nicholas’ Cathedral, Galway, before eight o’clock Mass on Sunday morning to receive from the hands of his lordship, Most Rev. Dr. Browne, Bishop of Galway, the new mayoral chain which his lordship had just blessed.

The other aldermen and councillors of the Corporation knelt at the altar rails as his lordship blessed the new robes of their office.

The ceremony was performed as the bells of the city churches and of the fourteenth century collegiate church in Lombard-st., formerly a Catholic church, were ringing out over the city. Incidentally, some of those bells of the collegiate church were donated by the old Corporation, dissolved almost a century ago.

Tourist road

About 140 men have been engaged on the Spiddal-Costelloe road for the past few weeks. This road is to be considerably widened and steamrolled and is part of the scheme of a proposed first class tourist road all round the Connemara coast.

From inquiries made by a “Connacht Tribune” reporter, it would appear that the apparent attitude of the Galway branch of the Gaelic League towards tourism does not at all represent the opinion of the people of Connemara on the subject.

Connemarians resent the insinuation that either their culture or their morals are of such a “hot-house” quality as to be easily adversely affected from without. They are proud of their tradition as regards both, and see no reason why the Galway branch should suspect them of having an inferiority complex in regard to either one or the other.

Connemarians also fail to see how the non-development of the tourist industry in the West is going to prevent thousands of young men from being forced to fly from the Gaeltacht to secure abroad the employment denied them at home.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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The construction of a new wheelchair-friendly footbridge by Galway Corporation over the Friar’s River Canal at Newtownsmith on October 20, 1998. It replaced the old temporary bridge that had become dangerous and could not take wheelchairs.

1922

Posting poor returns

Postal rates and telephone charges in Ireland are at the moment probably as high as they are in any country in the world, higher than they are in most.

The penny post has been restored in Great Britain, following the wage cut, which was introduced without any stoppage in the public service.

And the postal facilities in Ireland at the moment are probably worse than in any civilised state in the world. This is not altogether the fault of those who control the post office.

But, while much of this is due to conditions over which postal officials can have no control, a very considerable percentage of it is due to a badly run post office.

There is something very rotten in a service that loses a million a year, and yet gives the public only very indifferent results; for not merely are the Irish people paying abnormal postal and telegraph rates, but they are paying for the deficit in the form of taxation, so that their letters cost them much more than twopence.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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A little girl celebrates Sarsfields’ success in the County Hurling Final in 1997.

1922

The ‘pay-nobodies’

The righteous wrath of members of Galway County Council very properly manifested itself against the “pay nobodies” at the meeting on Saturday last.

“I am quite satisfied,” declared Dr. Walsh, “that numbers of people who defend the policy of not paying rates are thoroughly dishonest.”

Mr. Kennedy said the policy to-day was to pay nobody and the people who were in debt themselves “wanted everybody else to be in the same position”.

Mr. Tierney invoked the dictum of the Irish Hierarchy in regard to the payment of just and lawful debts. Verily, “there are greater thieves than Cacus” – men who have such noble and patriotic notions that, to their mind, national freedom is synonymous with freedom from just and lawful obligations. It is time the people paid their rates and debts and gave up their outworn cant.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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Oil-covered swans being rescued for cleaning from the water at the Claddagh following an oil spill into the River Corrib in March 2001. A spillage upstream reached the Claddagh Basin and dozens of swans had to be removed to a sanctuary for safe keeping. About 20 swans were so contaminated that they either died or had to be put down.

1922

Temperance club

A long-felt want in Galway has been supplied this week by the opening on Monday night of the temperance club in the Columban Hall.

The club, which will be carried on under the committee of the Pioneer Association, is not confined exclusively to pioneers, but will be open to persons who have a pledge against the use of alcoholic drinks.

There will be an entrance fee of 2s. and a nominal payment for members of 6d. a month will be required to pay expenses. It is intended to provide games, etc., on the premises and in the near future to organise concerts, debates, conversazione, etc.

Rev. Father Stapleton, director of the Pioneer Association, is interesting himself in the club, and those who know the kindly soggarth aroon’s organising capacity have no doubt as to the future success of the club.

Those desirous of joining should call at the hall any night during the week between the hours of 7 and 10.30 p.m.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

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