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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Time Gone By – A browse through the archives of the Connacht Tribune

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1913

Beating a donkey

At the Children’s Court, a young lad, the son of a Newcastle farmer, was prosecuted by Mr. Heard, D.I., with unlawfully ill-treating a donkey on the 4th inst.

Mrs. Shewell, wife of Capt. Shewell, Governor of Galway Jail, was the principal witness for the prosecution. She deposed seeing the boy furiously beating a donkey, which he was driving on the 4th September, thereby causing the animal great pain and drawing blood from its side; its tail was also cut.

When she went to where the defendant lived at Newcastle, she found the donkey still under the cart. The animal was in a very bad condition, and looked starved and very thin.

The youthful defendant was allowed out on his own recognisances, his father, who appeared for him, to be responsible for his good behaviour.

Reward for latrine theft

The Town Steward reported that on the morning of 17th inst. one of the money slots on the latrine at Salthill had been broken and a sum of money taken. He recommended that a higher entrance gate be erected, as the present one is too small.

Chairman: I suppose no one knows how much money was taken?

Town Steward: From what I took from it last Saturday, I should say there would be about 4s or 5s taken.

Mr. Moloney: That gate was ordered from the very beginning to be taken down as it was too small.

Mr. Faller suggested that a gate similar to those removable ones in front of shops be erected. It could be put in place every night. He also proposed that a reward of £1 be offered for information that would lead to the discovery of the guilty party.

1938

Chip shop gutted

Galway experienced its second fire within ten days on Sunday night, when a fish and chip shop, the property of Martin Flaherty, Church-street, Galway, was gutted.

The fire began with dramatic suddenness. Mrs. Flaherty, wife of the proprietor, and two assistants were serving customers when, it appears, the flue caught fire and in less time that it takes to tell a sheet of flame enveloped the huge range.

Customers left their suppers unfinished and rushed from the shop terror stricken. Some of the more plucky ones stayed to help to quell the flames, but their efforts were of no avail.

The fire quickly spread to the wooden cubicles, which burned like matchwood.

The Galway Fire Brigade, under Mr. C.J. O’Callaghan, borough surveyor, and Captain T. Duggan, were quickly on the scene. It was too late, however, to do anything for the shop, which by this time was a roaring den of flames.

Two families, Madden and Fortune, who were living on the second floor, quickly evacuated, and their furniture was removed through the windows.

The brigade laid nine lines of hose and fought the flames for three hours. They concentrated on preventing the fire from spreading. The terrific heat cracked many windows along the street. The efforts of the brigade were successful and after three-quarters of an hour they had the fire completely under control.

Poteen swoop

A large force of Gardai from the Headford district made a swoop on Keelkill at two o’clock on Friday morning and succeeded in capturing a complete still-house, which was found to contain two hundred gallons of wash, a still, work, buckets, jars, hurricane lamps, a keg containing five gallons of poteen, and a jar containing four gallons of poteen.

The still-house was ingeniously erected on the shores of the lake, so that the waters of the lake actually filled the purpose of acting as a cooler for the apparatus inside the house.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

 

Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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Attendees at the Blessing of Galway Bay on August 15, 1982.

1922

A leader lost

“I have the greatest hope in the Irish people. But what we have got to learn in our public life is the merit of following the unpopular path. We have plenty of physical courage. Moral courage is what we need – and above all, we must develop.”

These words were spoken by President Griffith a few weeks before his death. They were words of inspiration, hope, instruction. They revealed the optimism that carried the man through the gloom of dark years, the discouragements of dangerous days and nights, until at last his bold spirit cleft the clouds, and showed the Irish people light.

They displace as in a flash that optimism that bore him through to triumph, that spirit that inspired all his acts, that courage that held him in the fairway when others wandered into by-paths, and the constructive genius that, had he lived, would have seen an Ireland even in his own day that could stand four-square every wind that blew.

O’Connell has been described as the Irish Liberator, the great tribune of his people. Griffith laid well and truly the foundations of a movement which won a greater triumph than O’Connell.

Local enterprise

Through the commendable enterprise of Mrs. Payne, Cross-street, the people of Athenry are at last provided with an amusement hall in which they can pass away many a pleasant evening.

The hall, the building of which has been recently completed, is a commodious one and can accommodate quite a considerable number. Already a well-known theatrical company has had an engagement at the new hall when there was a magnificent attendance each night – the entertainment being the right thing in the right place.

In a few weeks’ time this company will return with a greatly enlarged array of artistes, when the townspeople will be treated to something they will not forget.

Practice dances will be held on Sunday evenings, and there is a suggestion to secure the services of a qualified teacher of Irish dances to bring up the rising generation with a knowledge of Irish step-dancing.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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Rev Fr Raymond Watters O.P recites a decade of the rosary as the rain begins to pour down during the Blessing of Galway Bay on August 15, 1882.

1922

Dawn surrender

National troops operating from Galway and Athenry at dawn on Wednesday morning surrounded an area about four miles between Liscananaun village and Aucloggeen, on the eastern side of the Corrib, and after a smart movement captured nineteen irregulars, with their officers, twenty-two service and Mauser rifles, a number of service revolvers and automatics, and considerable quantities of ammunition for bombs.

The National troops were under command of Co-Commandant Austin Brennan, O.C., Galway area, and the various battalion and company officers, and the plan to surround these villages, which lie in a marshy waste between the Curragh Line, or Galway-Headford road, and the main road from Galway to Tuam, was evolved after information had been received that a number of irregulars were quartered there, and were commandeering sheep and foodstuffs from people in surrounding districts.

Slowly and silently, accompanied by a Lancia armoured car on which machine guns were mounted, the National troops moved out from Galway shortly before two a.m. on Wednesday. One column took the Galway to Headford road, the other taking the Tuam road.

The column operating on the Headford road swung to the right beyond the Cregg river, taking the road to Drumgriffin. By dawn they had taken up extended formation in the woods around Cregg Castle, and this formed a trap into which the irregulars were subsequently driven.

Trade unions position

Mr. Cathal O’Shannon, T.D., in his presidential address at the Trade Union Congress on Monday, declare that organised Labour was separate from and independent of any political party, and would take no dictation from any quarter outside its own ranks.

He strongly protested against militarism, from whatever quarter it came, and condemned the political censorship of thought and opinion, the ignoring of laws relating to the custody of prisoners, the existence of a semi-military police force, and the propaganda on both sides.

The present conflict or strife, he declared, was unnecessary and counselled the Irish workers to keep aloof from it.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

 

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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A winner at Ballybrit in July 1964 is led back by its owner and connections.

1922

Civil War impact

Had Ireland enjoyed the blessings of peace this year, the summer and autumn of 1922 would have stood out in our annals as a period when we had entered upon the first stages of real prosperity and welcomed the Irish from overseas to the shores of a free land.

Thousands of Americans came in the earlier part of the season. They had wallets full of money, which they were willing and anxious to spend amongst the people of their own land. To their dismay and keen disappointment, they found Ireland in a state of war.

A holiday in the ordinary sense was out of the question. Many of them turned to the highlands of Scotland; others went to Oberammergau, and other parts of the Continent; some turned westward again.

The daily Press has been full of the impressions of these visitors. Some of them had gone through experiences which tinged these impressions with rankling bitterness. We can imagine what they will say when they return home!

Ireland has lost by this fratricidal strife morally as well as materially, and the tragedy is that the loss has yet to be fully accounted, and that it comes upon a nation that has just secured its freedom after a struggle of centuries and at a time when we need all the wealth and work we can secure for national reconstruction.

It is now a matter of doubt whether Galway race meeting can be held this year, as those interested are not keen on courting a failure that would lower the prestige that Ballybrit has won.

Wait goes on for light

The proposed scheme for electric lighting of the town of Athenry has been temporarily postponed owing to the present condition of the country. The proposed capital was to be £3,000, £2,100 of which was to be subscribed by seven directors, while the rest was to be got from shareholders. It is expected that the project will be re-mooted as soon as opportunity offers.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

 

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