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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Time Gone By – A browse through the archives of the Connacht Tribune.

Enda Cunningham

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on

1913

Portumna mystery

The disappearance of a respectable farmer named John Brooder from his residence, Church Hill, Portumna, has caused a great sensation throughout the district. He was a respected and an amiable man, and resided alone on a large farm for years. He was last seen in town on the 5th August.

Although the most careful search has been made during the last fortnight by the police, under the direction of District Inspector Harrison, aided by the local people, no clue can be got as to his mysterious disappearance.

When last seen, he had close on £50 in his possession, but latterly it has transpired that this is in safe keeping. The most sensational rumours as to his disappearance are being circulated, but there are no grounds for them. He was looked upon as a very harmless man, and universal regret is expressed fearing that he may have met an untimely end.

Mountbellew transport

We notice with pleasure that the movement that is successfully on foot in Mountbellew district, to form a society to work the motor service in the locality. In a district so far remote from any railway station, such a service is badly needed. The district the motor service is intended to work over is a rich one, and we venture to say that before many years those who are now slightly sceptical will wonder at the narrow-mindedness or want of clear thinking which gave rise to the scepticism.

1938

Bus inspector crashes

Edward Walshe, aged 23 years, a mobile bus inspector employed by the Great Southern Railways Company (Galway branch), was admitted to Galway Central Hospital at a late hour on Wednesday night last, suffering from terrible head and other injuries sustained when his motor-cycle crashed at Keleenlane, two miles outside Tuam on the Galway-Tuam road. His condition is stated to be critical.

Mr. Walshe, who is a native of Balllina, was returning to Galway from Tuam at about 10.15pm on Wednesday when, it is stated, three horses, chased by a dog, ran out from a side road in front of the motor-cycle. Mr. Walshe swerved to the right side of the road to avoid them, and had to swerve back again to avoid an oncoming cyclist. He lost control of the machine, which fell on top of him, pinning him to the road.

Footballers for Croker

A game Monaghan team which played spirited football to the end were unable to hold the western champions at Mullingar on Sunday, in the all-Ireland semi-final. Almost from the beginning it was evident that the Galway men would dominate the play, and the only point at issue was the margin which would lie in their favour at the end.

A powerful Galway defence broke up the Monaghan attacks. The Galway pair at centre were severely tested, but they generally got the best of the exchanges. The Monaghan defenders made a great stand, but were unable to break up many of the Galway attacks. It finished Galway 2-10 to Monaghan 2-3.

Fishing ‘goldmine’

“I believe there is a real gold mine in the waters off the West coast and I do not see why the fishing industry could not be operated successfully in the Twenty-six counties as well as in Northern Ireland,” said Mr. W. Craig Pollock, consulting engineer, Stormont, Belfast.

Mr Pollock’s interest in fishing is not just that of the ordinary man who sees in it a neglected industry. He is Convenor for the Northern Ireland Industrial Development Committee, a body organised for the purpose of establishing new industries in the North.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

Stephen Corrigan

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on

A view of Galway City captured from atop Galway Fire Station in 1979, taking in Wolfe Tone Bridge and some of Fish Market Square. The site of McDonogh's Fertilizers is now home to Jury's Hotel, while there have also been significant changes to the buidings on Quay Lane over the years.

1920

Workers for peace

English Labour, which appears to have found itself as impotent in the face of the mechanical Coalition majority at Westminster as the Irish Party found itself against Carsonism in the days of the Curragh revolt, has at last been afforded an opening towards making an effective bid for peace with Ireland.

The Irish Trades’ Congress this week accepted the British workers’ conditions of settlement, and noted that their teams, unlike those of British Ministers, leave no loopholes and are devoid of ambiguity.

Briefly, the British workers suggest that the present campaign of militarism against the Irish people should end; that a constituent Irish assembly should be elected by proportional representation, and that it should devise a constitution subject only to the safeguards of minorities and the naval and military interests of the British Empire.

It is a significant advance that democracies on each side of the Irish Sea find themselves not merely in agreement as to the methods by which peace may be brought about, but ready to translate these methods to action if the opportunity is given.

Older politicians, however, will not fail to register the initial criticism that when British parties are out of power, they are always ready to extend the hand of friendship to Ireland and to back up the gesture with promises that they cannot at the moment fulfil.

Witness to the case of Mr. Asquith who as Prime Minister in 1914 gave the lead in the doctrine that the Irish minority must continue to rule the majority and in 1920 when he is out of power, pours his anathemas upon his successors for carrying his policy to its logical outcome.

Nevertheless, we have not lost faith in a constitutional settlement. It must be obvious to all sane thinkers that sooner or later peace will have to be brought about by negotiation. The sword can never produce a settlement; only those who would recklessly ignore the lessons of history could hold with the doctrine that force can remedy a situation that has become intolerable.

There is a strong will to peace in Ireland to-day, and it is clear that the cumulative effect of the limited publicity that has been gained from present-day conditions in Ireland is having its effect upon English opinion.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

Stephen Corrigan

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on

Over 100 locals had roles as extras in the production of The Quiet Man which was filmed at locations in Galway and Mayo, including Ballyglunin and Cong.

1920

Kitchen flogging

One of the most singular cases of flogging yet recorded occurred in Tuam on Saturday night (writes our North Galway representative).

About 11 p.m. a number of men with revolvers knocked at the house of Mr. Pk. Canavan, town clerk, Foster-place, and, finding the door open, rushed into the house.

Mr. Martin Canavan and some young men lodging in the house were sitting in the dining-room, and were about to retire for the night. Mrs. Canavan and her children were in bed.

According to an eye-witness’s account of the affair, there were fourteen or fifteen men in the raiding party. Some were dressed in overcoats and soft hats, and some wore Glengarry caps.

They ordered all in the room to put up their hands, and asked if the house was Cooney’s. Mr. Canavan said Cooney’s house was next door. He and the others were then searched, and a young man named McDonnell, a draper’s assistant was asked if he was a Sinn Féiner.

He said he had nothing to do with Sinn Féin. Then he was asked, “what about your confederates,” and he said he had no confederates. Two private letters from a sister and a brother were taken from him and read, but it does not appear that there was any references in the letters to anything political.

Mr McDonnell was taken out to the kitchen, stripped, and put across a sewing machine, and flogged with leather straps and buckles for about twenty minutes.

Mrs. Canavan came down to inquire what was wrong. She and Mr. Canavan protested against the treatment of Mr. McDonnell, a young man who had no act or part in politics.

She was ordered back upstairs. Her children screamed with fright. Those in the dining-room were asked “on their honour” if they had any gun or revolvers in the house, and on their stating that they had not, they were told to sit down. On leaving, the leader of the party turned back and bade them “good night.”

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

Stephen Corrigan

Published

on

A grandstand view at the Galway v Clare, Church and General National Hurling League game in Athenry on Sunday, April 13, 1997. PHOTO: JOE O'SHAUGHNESSY

1920

Young mother killed

Rev. J. Considine, B.A., C.C., Gort, sent the following telegram to the Press on Tuesday:

“Married woman, twenty-three years’ old, within two months of child-birth, holding child of nine months in her arms, shot in abdomen here yesterday afternoon by armed forces. Died a few hours afterwards. Whole country, police and military stationed here, shocked.”

In a somewhat similar telegram to Mr. A. Griffith, T.D., Fr. Considine said he had telegraphed to Sir H. Greenwood.

The victim of the appalling occurrence is Mrs. Eileen Quinn, of Kiltartan, wife of popular farmer, and daughter of Mr. M. Gilligan, Raheen. She was sitting by a stile in front of her house with her baby in her arms when a lorry of uniformed men passed by at a rapid rate. Suddenly there was a burst of fire and Mrs. Quinn was hit in the right groin, and a number of fowl in the yard were killed. Mrs. Quinn staggered to the door with her baby, which she handed to a servant, and she then collapsed in a pool of blood.

Mrs. Quinn, says another report, was in great agony for two hours before she died. She leaves three children, the eldest of whom is not yet four years of age. Her husband was in Gort at the time, and a messenger, who summoned a priest and a doctor, acquainted him of the occurrence. Another messenger, going to Ardrahan for Doctor Foley, was wounded by a stray bullet.

Uniformed men passed into Gort subsequently, firing shots about the place. When the lorry passed the house where Mrs. Quinn lay dying the grief-stricken inhabitants fled the back way.

Father Considine, asked for an interview, said: “Please don’t ask me – I cannot. I feel unable to give it. It is too awful, too unhuman to contemplate.”

At first, Father Considine broke down and cried bitterly, “I have heard of Turkish atrocities,” he said. “I have read of the death of Joan of Arc, I have read of the sufferings of Nurse Cavell, and as I read those things I often felt my blood boil, and I often prayed that the good God would change the hearts of the perpetrators, but little did I then dream that I should witness a tragedy more cruel than any of those things, and out here in our own little peaceful parish. My God, it is awful.”

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app

The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

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