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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By – A browse through the archives of the Connacht Tribune.

Enda Cunningham

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1913

600 strike
On Saturday morning last, as a result of the failure of the Galway Branch (No. 20) of the National Union of Dock Labourers to come to an agreement with the City Branch of the Employers’ Federation, in regard to working rules and rates of wages for the present year, between 500 and 700 men struck work. These comprised dockers and casual labourers, yardsmen, carters, builders’ labourers etc.

The situation thus created was unprecedented in the history of Galway, or, indeed, of any town in Connacht. It immediately resulted in an almost total dislocation of traffic, and in considerable injury to business.

The strike, which has been brought about by the consolidation and sectional organisation of practically all the forces of labour in the city within the past two years, was at first taken not very seriously by the citizens.

As a result of the trouble, the City police force has been considerably augmented, and its strength now stands at about 150. There is no unusual police activity, however, nor has the necessity for it arisen.

Police and civilians
The Achill magistrates on Monday agreed to adjourn several cases and cross-cases of assault between police and civilians, the later mainly women, arising out of an affray on 7th March last in connection with the agitation for the transfer of land.

Rev. Father Colleran, P.P., in applying for the adjournment, said there was peace on the island, and the people would guarantee to continue the peace, but it should be understood that they were not giving up the agitation, and would pay no rent until they got the land.

1938

Soldier badly injured
Martin Conneely, the Claddagh, Galway, a private in the Irish Free State National Army, stationed at Renmore Barracks, was admitted to the Central Hospital, Galway, late on Wednesday night suffering from severe head injuries received when, it is stated, he was dazzled by the lights of an oncoming car, while cycling near the Claddagh, lost his balance, and fell twenty feet into the Claddagh basin below. The tide was out at the time.He was immediately removed to the Central Hospital, but a “Connacht Tribune” representative was informed on Thursday morning that Conneely was still unconscious.

Boy struck by car
A young boy named Keogh, from Canal Road, Galway, while on his way to school on Thursday morning at about 9a.m. was struck by a Ford Ten motor car at the Salmon Weir Bridge. The boy was suffering from shock and slight injuries and was immediately removed to the Central Hospital, but was not detained. He is a son of Mr. T. Keogh, N.T., St. Brendan’s School, Galway.

Vocational education
The evening classes in the Tuam Vocational School are such a success that practically all of them are filled with students, and a waiting list has been opened for new students. These evening classes include cookery, engineering, woodwork and domestic economy, Irish and art classes. There are a few vacancies in the art, Irish and commercial. Altogether 160 students are attending the evening classes, which continue from 8.15pm to 10 o’clock each night. We believe this is a record for a vocational school such a short time open.
For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

Stephen Corrigan

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on

Seventies-style and sophistication on show at the Autumn Fashion Show in Leisureland in September 1975.

1919

Disgraceful conditions

A report was forwarded through the Local Government Board, from Mr. Pack Beresford, on the condition of the labourers’ houses in Aughrim.

It showed they were in a most disgraceful way, without any sanitary accommodation and little better than hovels.

Fr Coughlan in a letter to the Local Government Board drew attention to the unsanitary, unchristian and savage conditions under which the poor labourers of Aughrim had to live.

As it was Fr. Dan Coughlan brought the matter up first, the Council returned their thanks to him, and it was decided to take steps to have proper houses built.

Economic danger

The country is at present passing through a period in its economic history which is full of dangers. There is a sinister tinge of irony in the reflection that a war, that has brought sorrow and devastation on many peoples and many lands, has brought wealth and prosperity to other people and other lands.

In a small measure, relatively speaking, the Irish farmer has been able to share in that prosperity. The demand for increased food production and his own efforts and industry have succeeded, during these terrible years, in finding bread and work for himself and his children.

In the result, both have lived in comparative comfort. To-day, America is seeking out immigrants who shall be good citizens and capable workers. The State Emigration Department of Washington is looking towards Ireland.

It does not want anarchists of revolutionaries from southern Europe. And of all the heterogeneous company that crowds into the States, the Irish emigrants make the best and most reliable citizens.

The difficulties of securing passports are rapidly disappearing. The day is drawing nearer when our young men and women, if they are not given a decent incentive to secure bread at home, will pour forth in thousands to the land where ten million Irish have found a home.

Water complaints

Complaints from all sides as to the City’s water supply were heard at the meeting of the Galway Urban Council yesterday (Mr. J. S. Young presiding).

First there was a letter from the Dominican Convent, Taylor’s Hill, about the insufficiency of the supply to the Convent.

The Town Steward (Mr. Molloy) said the tank in the convent was filled every night, but that it was wasted very soon. There were 200 people in the place.

Mr. Cooke thought it was a great surprise that after spending so much money on their new waterworks’ system that there should be a shortage. – “It is extraordinary,” agreed the Chairman.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

Stephen Corrigan

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on

At the Pres Galway Bon Voyage Ball in 1975 were (from left): Mary Higgins, Colmcille Road, Shantalla; Teresa O'Connell, Oughterard; Carrie Walsh, Fairlands Park, Newcastle; Ann Keating, Fairlands Park; and Eleanor Coyne, Davis Road, Shantalla.

1919

Essential publicity

At the conclusion of the quarterly meeting of Galway County Council on Wednesday of last week, the question of the county advertising was discussed. The subject came up at the end of a three hours’ sitting, the great part of which was concerned with demands for increases in salaries.

In fact, if these demands had been cut out, there would be very little County Council left! But the attendance had petered away, and scarcely a quorum was left to decide whether the Council should or should not advertise its various activities in the principal newspapers in County Galway.

The attitude of these remaining members was decidedly friendly and intelligent. But the attitude of the two principal officials of the Council, both of whom took part in the discussion, deserves careful examination.

For it has to be remembered that without publicity – adequate and full publicity – a representative money-spending authority must cease to function healthily as such and may become a danger and a menace to the community.

Moreover, a cardinal principal of democracy is undermined by the refusal to adopt or frankly to submit to such publicity, and the most vicious form of bureaucracy is enthroned in its stead.

Let there be no mistake on this point. We have already seen how necessary. how absolutely essential, is the fullest and frankest publicity in relation to the administration of public bodies in County Galway. It is therefore of relatively greater significance when It concerns the premier spending authority.

Pay increase

Last evening, Mr. E. P. Harte, organiser of the Dock Labourers’ Union, with Mr. P. Garvey, chairman of the branch, and Mr. W. Flaherty, secretary, met the Employers Federation in conference, Mr. Martin McDonogh in the chair, and as a result of an interchange of views an all-round increase of 4s. was granted for all classes of men, with the exception of the workers in the flour mills who have recently had an advance under the Government scheme.

The proceedings were most cordial, and the utmost good-will was displayed on both sides. This brings the wages of the ordinary worker up to £2 5s. 6d. weekly.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

 

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

Stephen Corrigan

Published

on

Work underway building St Pat's Boxing Club in Bohermore in June, 1971.

1919

Shipbuilding in Galway

A well-known London syndicate of shipbuilders which has recently established the industry on a considerable scale in Swansea, is anxious to secure a site for a shipbuilding yard on the west Coast of Ireland.

The name of Galway has been mentioned and we are led to understand that the Company would come to Galway if it was given an encouragement to do so.

Should Galway Harbour Board express the readiness to provide facilities and afford a site, negotiations will immediately be opened, and should those be successful, the work of erecting a yard would be begun almost at once.

Showing at The Victoria

There will be no lack of attractions at the premier picture house next week. It is a good while back since there was a “visit” from Queenie Thomas. No daintier and cleverer film actress ever stood before the camera, and she will take the chief role in a superb picture, entitled, “It’s Happiness that Counts,” on Sunday night.

The “Circus King,” such a favourite with those fond of thrills, will finish up on Monday and Tuesday nights, when its last episode will be screened.

On those nights, too, will open a great new serial, “The Silent Mystery.” It will be well worth seeing the first episode to learn of its enthralling plot.

Arms raid

Between eight and nine o’clock on Sunday night a raid for arms took place at the house of Lieut-Colonel Bernard, Castlehackett, near Tuam.  A party of nine or ten masked men entered, went to the butler and demanded to be shown where the guns were, and threatened him.

He gave them a shotgun. They also went to the gardener, Jackson, and made a similar demand, and were supplied by him with another gun.  The raiders took away about thirty rounds of ammunition, and it is said that they came across money which they did not take, saying it was guns they wanted, and adding that they would return them safely when they got their own back.

Lieut-Colonel Bernard is in England at present. The police are diligently pursuing inquiries into the matter, but so far no arrests have been made.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app

The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

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