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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By – A browse through the archives of the Connacht Tribune

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1913

Suicide attempt

A fair-haired lad, of apparently not more than twenty, was put into the dock before Mr. Justice Madden, at the Galway Summer Assizes, and indicted for an attempt to commit suicide on 20th December last. He pleaded guilty.

Mr. Fetherstonhaugh, K.C., who, with Mr. Coll, B.L. (instructed by Mr. Golding, Crown Solicitor), replying to a question from his lordship, said he understood that the boy’s mother would look after him.

He had been in an asylum for some time, and had to be looked after as a result of the severe injury he had inflicted on himself. His mother was a poor woman.

Mr. Justice Madden, in allowing the prisoner out on his own recognisances of £10, said that he had made enquiries, and learned that the prisoner committed this injury on himself probably as a result of drink. He warned him to keep away from drink in the future.

The prisoner was then allowed out, and left the Court accompanied by his mother, who promised to look after him.

1938

New bridges

For the erection of two new canal bridges in Galway City – one at University road and the other at Claddagh – Galway County Council’s finance committee had before them at their weekly meeting six cross-Channel tenders and one Galway tender.

The two new bridges will replace the existing old bridges, and it is the intention of the County Council to proceed later with the replacement of the three other canal bridges in the city.

Shark struggle

Michael Roche and John F. King, two fishermen of Keeraunmore, Aillebrack, had a four-hours struggle with a shark which became entangled in their mackerel nets, last week.

When the fishermen, who were in a currach, held on to the nets, the shark dragged them for miles before they eventually succeeded in dispatching him with the blade of a scythe which they carried in the boat.

They then dragged him ashore and disentangled him from the nets, which were badly damaged. The shark was over twenty feet long.

Weather spoilsport

Because of the inclemency of the weather, all sporting fixtures were postponed in Galway on Sunday. By the aid of the “loudspeaker on wheels”, Galway people were notified early on Sunday morning that the Galway Swimming Club’s sixth annual gala was off.

Connacht title clash

The stage is set for what should prove a titanic struggle when the old rivals, Mayo and Galway, meet in the Connacht Senior football final at Roscommon on Sunday next.

Not alone is the Connacht title at stake, according to some, but also the All-Ireland, as it is freely expressed that the Connacht winners will be favourites for the “major” title.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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Student musicians who took part in the Dominican College, Taylor's Hill production of My Fair Lady in January 1998.

1923

Influenza cure

Of the ills to which human flesh is heir, those which result from the periodical influenza epidemic are, perhaps, the most devastating.

The toll of human life in the great epidemic of 1918-’19 was unparalleled in the more recent history of the world. It is calculated that in the twelve months the epidemic claimed more victims than fell in the four-and-a-half years of the European war.

In Ireland the disease was no respecter of persons, the flower of the race falling an easy prey to the germ. Indeed, it is rather a remarkable fact that it was amongst the young manhood and womanhood of the country that the ravages of the disease were greatest.

This week the welcome news has been published that the bacteriologists at the Rockefeller Institute, New York, have isolated the influenza germ, and that the cure of the disease is in sight.

The discovery of the germ itself is of inestimable importance for the welfare of humanity and augurs the possibly of influenza being made a preventable disease like smallpox in, it is to be hoped, the not far distant future.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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Orla McArdle, Leonie Ryan, Maeve Lohan, Sinéad Armstrong, Maria Lyons and Paul Ryan who were taking part in the Coláiste Iognáid production of 'Joseph' in the Jesuit Hall, Sea Road on February 5, 1991.

1923

Training ex-soldiers

A meeting of the committee of Galway Technical Institute was held on Tuesday, Mr. Eraut presiding.

The secretary, Dr. Webb, stated that there was a deputation outside from the Galway Carpenters’ Society in reference to the offer made by the Ministry of Labour to the committee to have up to 100 ex-soldiers trained in the institute in various crafts from joinery to thatching houses and making tin cans.

The difficulty he foresaw in regard to the scheme was to train maimed ex-solders and for this the Ministry of Labour was willing to give the committee 15s. per head per week. It was a money-making scheme so far as that committee was concerned, and would result in bringing a good deal of money into the city, because there would also be certain allowances for the wives and dependents.

He estimated that it would mean something like £200 or £300 per week. It was a question for the committee whether they would provide these classes. He had inquired from an authoritative source whether the training of these men would be likely to interfere with the employment of the recognised carpenter, and he was informed in the negative.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

 

 

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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Taking part in the West of Ireland Bridge Congress at UCG in April 1983 were Phil Carey, Newcastle, Eileen Murphy, Taylor's Hill, Carmel Howard, Cross Street and Claire Burke, Salthill. This year’s Bridge Congress is taking place next week at the Ardilaun Hotel from February 3 to February 5.

1923

Islanders’ distress

A correspondent sends authentic particulars of distress prevailing in the Islands of Aran. There is extreme poverty in Inishmore, especially in Killeany; large numbers in the village are on the verge of starvation, kept alive by the charity of neighbours, with scarcely a healthy child amongst them.

The people own no land, notwithstanding that the Congested Districts Board has a large tract; they fish and labour when the former is profitable or practicable and when the work can be found. To-day they are without either.

Similar stories come from other island villages. Yet last October Mr. Blythe stated in the Dáil that £1,000 had been granted for the relief of distress on the islands. The money was placed at the disposal of the Galway Rural District Council, which refused to have anything to do with the scheme.

Accordingly, the grant was never made. It is alleged that the inhabitants of Inishmore have refused to pay rates, but islanders state in reply that rates were not collected for some two years, nor were demand notes issued. The whole position is so grave that it should be looked into without further delay, and we understand that all the circumstances have been referred to Deputy O’Connell for this purpose.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

 

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