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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

Stephen Corrigan

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on

1919

Outlook for farmers

The farmers’ associations of Ireland compel admiration by one outstanding fact: they have stood firmly against the efforts made to drag them into politics, and thereby destroy that essential unity in which their only hope for the future lies.

And that the future of farming is dark and uncertain no one can deny. Therefore, we hope that the shrewd, hard-headed farmers of Ireland, who have achieved great things in food production during the war, will continue to merit our admiration by giving their best in careful and earnest thought and reasoned and progressive effort in the future.

Religion and politics

The Most Rev. Dr. Gilmartin, Archbishop of Tuam, on his first Confirmation visitation to Westport since his elevation to the Archbishopric of Tuam, confirmed a large number of children in Westport Parish Church on Sunday.

Preaching after last Mass to a crowded congregation, His Grace paid a glowing tribute to the Christian Brothers, nuns and national teachers for the excellent answering of the children at the Confirmation examination on Saturday.

Dealing with priests in politics, His Grace said: “Coming to inquire into the lives of the people, I have to say in all sincerity that you have not in that district more prudent and zealous priests than you have got here in Westport. The Administrator is a man with a level head who in difficult time was able to do the right thing. We are passing through a period of unrest and turmoil, and there was political unrest and turmoil here in Westport.

“While every man, priest as well as layman, has a right to his political opinion, and the right to express it, he should not introduce any party politics into the Church or into religion. Why? Because politics are concerned with temporal matters. The aim of politics is the temporal welfare of the people, and to the end of time people will differ in politics.

This is a preview only. For the full Days Gone By from 1919, 1944, 1969 and 1994, see this week’s Tribune

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

Stephen Corrigan

Published

on

A Claddagh woman looks on at activities taking place on the Swamp at the annual August Claddagh Festival in South Park.

1920

Beef or bacon

Mr. P. Cahill presided at Saturday’s meeting of the Loughrea Board of Guardians. Also present: Messrs. J. O’Loughlin, J. D. Cronin, J. Flannery, and J. Ryan.

Honor Murphy, Laundress, applied for bacon instead of beef, as the beef which she got was chiefly bone.

Clerk: She is the laundry woman. – Master: she doesn’t care for beef. – Chairman: You can give her bacon so. – Mr. O’Loughlin: There is no use in giving the creature bones, anyway.

Clerk: Then you will grant her bacon to the same value? – Chairman: Yes. – An order was made that 1½ lbs. bacon be supplied to the applicant weekly.

Mrs Lizzie Burke, Galway-road, in making an application for outdoor relief stated she was in a delicate state of healing, and was unable to provide anything in the way of nourishment. – Chairman: What do you propose to do, gentlemen?

Mr. O’Loughlin: We can’t go behind the relieving officer’s report. He states she had two daughters and two sons earning. – Chairman: In that case there would be danger of a surcharge if we granted relief. – Mr. O ’Loughlin: What was the relieving officer appointed for if we don’t uphold his reports. – The application was marked “refused.”

An inmate named Mrs. B. Sweeney applied for a shawl, a pair of boots and a skirt, to enable her to leave the house.

Mr. O’Loughlin: I believe myself she has them all well-earned. – Master: She is a good working woman. – Chairman: She is going to leave the house now? – Master: Yes. The application was granted.

The tender of Mr. J. Donovan at £6 15s. for extending drain at workhouse to opposite side of public road was accepted.

Dr. J. F. Ryan applied for and was granted annual vacation of one month in two parts, beginning in early June and August next. – Dr. Crowley was appointed as locum tenens.

Division in Irish life

A new set of symbols has been added to the already over-weighted burden that signifies divisions in Irish life. The three Fs have been given a sinister twist under the unsettled conditions that prevail.

As a people, we appear to have a fatal facility for cleavages, class and political lines of demarcation. In the present instance, the perpetrators have been the Irish farmers – to be accurate, a strong section within the powerful and expanding Irish farmers’ Union.

Last week Press and public were in the dark as to what transpired behind closed doors at the Galway Congress in regard to one subject of transcending importance: the attitude of the Union towards Labour and the embargo on the export of foodstuffs to England. This week the secret is out.

We have before us a circular issued to each member of the Union descriptive of what is required to form the proposed Farmers’ Freedom Force.

The draftsmanship reveals the ordered and acute mind of Lt.-Col. Bryan, of Wexford, the vice-chairman of the organisation. It sets out frankly “to provide a permanent organised body in each branch and county area of Ireland ready for immediate action.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

Stephen Corrigan

Published

on

Film star Peter O'Toole joins ballad singers Eamon Rabbitte and Jack Geary in a session in Patsy Glynn's bar on Mary Street. Also in the picture are members of the Connact Tribune staff at the time, Andrew King, James Smith and James O'Donnell. Also pictured is Fred Herterich, vituallar, Lombard Street.

1920

Providing excursions

It has always been a source of complaint against Galway that it provides no pleasurable excursions for tourists. We have frequently urged the co-operation of the principal hotels so that motor runs and other means of providing interest and amusement might be established to attract visitors.

But one speaks to empty sounding spaces in this respect in Galway. The one hopeful evidence of progress we have had in recent years is the Omnibus Company. Possessed, as it is now, of a double-decker and a single-decker ‘bus and a char-a-banc, the directors intend to utilise the latter for pleasurable runs around Galway at reasonable fares.

On Sunday afternoon last twenty-nine passengers enjoyed a trip to Oughterard, for which 6s. return fare was charged. The double-decker will reinforce the two other vehicles by June 1.

It is a pity the controllers could not see their way to reduce the fare from Galway to Salthill, which is probably higher than that charged by any similar company for a trip of equal length.

Whilst it would be reasonable to charge the present fare during Race Week, we think a means could be found to effect a small reduction for the rest of the year.

Hair sheared in attack

Another haircutting outrage took place in a village called Cushlough, Castlemoyle about five miles from Tuam on Sunday night.

At about 11.30 p.m. five men, absolute strangers in the neighbourhood, and wearing no disguise of any sort, casually raised the latch of the door of Mr. Wm. Mannion’s house. The lamp in the kitchen was in full glow and Mannion’s sons had just returned home.

The other occupants, Ms. A. Divine, her grandmother, and two old men, had retired for the night. The party asked the son if a girl named Annie Divine lived there. They were told she was in bed, and the room was pointed out.

One man held a revolver towards Mannion’s son, whilst two held his hands behind his back. The two men entered Miss Divine’s bedroom. Hearing her name mentioned she had by this time jumped up and sat on the side of the bed with a cloak around her.

One of the men produced a letter which he said was taken in the capture of the mail bags between Bantry and Bandon. It was addressed to her from an R.I.C. constable named Edward Daly, son of Mr. Patk. Daly, Birmingham, in the neighbourhood of Miss Divine’s place.

He had joined the R.I.C. about two years ago, and she was acquainted with him before that. The contents of the letter were read for Miss Divine, and she says there was no reference in it to Sinn Féin, except that he asked her if she was attending the dances at Addergoole Sinn Féin hall.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

Stephen Corrigan

Published

on

Tom Feeney, Fairhill Road, pointing to the damage on the Claddagh Coach outside his home. A David versus Goliath tug of war has developed between Tom and C.I.E. over the preservation of the Claddagh Coach. The citizen distressed by the deterioration of the coach which was parked for some years in the C.I.E. main city yard took the coach to his own home and wanted to preserve it properly or be given a guarantee that C.I.E. would do so before he handed it back. The Claddagh Coach was a first class example of the transport of its era and sections of it at least are several hundreds of years old. Its origins are not quite clear but the coach made its first public appearance of modern times about the mid 1950s when the late Brian B. Collins, then manager of the Great Southern Hotel, had it redecorated and introduced a coach tour of Galway which was very popular with tourists for many years.

1920

Apathetic electorate

“Utter apathy” is the phrase that would best describe the attitude of the general public towards the Local government elections which will be held in June. Indeed, as far as County Galway is concerned, these elections are all but over.

Twelve members of the County Council have already been elected; only eight remain to be elected for the Galway and Connemara areas. Thus in three of the five county electoral areas there will be no contests.

In the Galway area there are six candidates for four seats; in the Oughterard (Connemara) area there are five candidates for four seats.

The most noteworthy feature of the county and rural elections is the disappearance out of public life of old and familiar figures. A few of those who had themselves nominated have since withdrawn.

Only stalwart fighters like Mr. Martin McDonogh remain to carry the contest to the polling booth.

Secret societies

Mr. A. Staunton (Chairman) presided at the weekly meeting of the Ballinasloe Urban Council on Tuesday evening, Mary 4. The other members present were: Messrs. J. Shaughnessy, F. Clayton, Craughwell, T. Derham, T. Murray, McDonnell, M. Connolly, Michl. Ryan, M. Nevin and Dr. Rutherford.

This was the first meeting to be held at the new hour – eight o’clock. The members assembled in committee at 7 o’clock to discuss an important question concerning the rents and tenants of the Council’s cottages.

The proceedings continued on to eight o’clock, when the estimate for the current year was also discussed in detail, but no decision was arrived at. The Press was not permitted to be present. The rate question was again gone into at the Council meeting proper, which was held at 8.30.

Mrs. Gavin was waiting from 7 until 8.30 with a view to asking the Council to provide a recreation ground for the town. When allowed into the council chamber, she indignantly said: “It is scandalous to keep ratepayers outside – they should be allowed to be present.”

Proceeding, Mrs. Gavin said she was kept waiting in the cold for an hour and a half, and it was the people who were saying rates should be allowed to be present.

“There should be no secret societies,” she asserted with great heat.

Chairman: The meeting should only start at 8 o’clock. – “There should be no secret societies behind the ratepayers’ back,” answered Mrs. Gavin. “Waiting for an hour and a half is uncalled for.”

The minutes having been read, Mrs. Gavin asked if there was anything regarding the deputation that was to wait on Mr. Davidson regarding the horse show grounds.

The Chairman said there was a letter from Mr. Davidson saying it was his recollection that the trustees of the Clancarty estate would not consent to the extension of the grounds for various reasons.

Mr. Ryan suggested that a point deputation from the Council and parties interested in town wait on Mr. Davidson. Mr Clayton seconded, the Chairman agreed, and this was the decision come to.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app

The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

 

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