Galway In Days Gone By

The Renmore Volleyball team who lost out to Tuam in the Community Games Volleyball final in 1973: (kneeling from left) Geraldine Hosty, Mary Leonard, Mary Arrigan, Captain, Mary Monahan and Carmel Cox. Standing Jacintha Keane, Marie Heavey, Brid Dillon, Marion Sweeney, Joan Burke, Deirdre Mannion and Treasa Dooley.
The Renmore Volleyball team who lost out to Tuam in the Community Games Volleyball final in 1973: (kneeling from left) Geraldine Hosty, Mary Leonard, Mary Arrigan, Captain, Mary Monahan and Carmel Cox. Standing Jacintha Keane, Marie Heavey, Brid Dillon, Marion Sweeney, Joan Burke, Deirdre Mannion and Treasa Dooley.

1919

Five to a bed

It was reported from Corrandulla to Galway Guardians on Wednesday that Martin Lardner, his wife and five children were seriously ill from pneumonia. – Dr. Cusack, M.P., appeared before the board and said that he called at the house when he heard of the case.

The father and a baby were dying. The five children were lying in one bed, and it was necessary to climb over them to give them attention.

The nurse in attendance was doing her work fairly well. The people were very badly off.

Mr. Lardner: I was told that the mother was given up. – Dr. Cusack said he would visit the people again and would do all in his power for them.

The Relieving Officer was directed to get all the provisions necessary for the family’s relief.

Fuel price controls

Arising out of a communication received from the Fuel Controller regarding turf prices, Mr. O’Loughlin said they were having neither turf nor coal at present in Loughrea.

Mr. Greene said local coal merchants were charging at the rate of £4 10s. per ton for coal which was considered in excess of that fixed by the local authority.

In reply to a query, Mr. Connell said the Commissioners allowed a profit of 5s. on coal sold by the ton and 7s. 6d. per ton on coal retailed in cwts. – Mr. Greene said those prices were not observed. He thought the matter should be brought under the notice of the police.

Mr. O’Loughlin: As an urban authority we are bound to fix the price of turf.

1944

Disruption avoided

Not only will the postal service to and from Galway will escape the serious disruption which was expected to follow the drastic reduction in train services, but the new arrangements will provide a more speedy service on most days of the week.

The only set-back is that there will be no despatch on two days every week, but, on the other hand, there will be two deliveries of incoming mails on four days instead of one delivery every week day as heretofore.

The postal service for the country areas also has been reorganised to provide the best service possible under the circumstanes.

Street widening

Preparatory work for the widening of Bridge-street, Galway, and part of Lombard-street is now in progress.

The wall which runs from O’Brien’s Bridge to the ruined building opposite St. Nicholas’s Collegiate Church is now being torn down and a wall will be built further back from the present roadway.

The ruined building which was formerly a fish and chip shop in Lombard-street will be pulled down.

The whole work, which is being carried out by Mr. G. Lee, County Surveyor, is estimated to cost £1,162.

The sharp corner at the junction of Bridge-street and Lombard-street will go and its place will be taken by an easy turn.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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