Galway In Days Gone By

Prizewinners in the dancing competitions at the Ballygar Gymkhana and Aeríocht in August 1971 included (from left) Bridie Kelly, Newbridge, who came first in the Under 12 Jog competition; Mary Nolan, Ballygar, who was first in the Under 14 Jog competition; and Margaret Kelly, Shanballymore, who was second in the Under 12 Jog competition.
Prizewinners in the dancing competitions at the Ballygar Gymkhana and Aeríocht in August 1971 included (from left) Bridie Kelly, Newbridge, who came first in the Under 12 Jog competition; Mary Nolan, Ballygar, who was first in the Under 14 Jog competition; and Margaret Kelly, Shanballymore, who was second in the Under 12 Jog competition.

1919

Celebrating St Patrick

A devoted and enthusiastic assembly met to participate in the very distinctive entertainment held in the Town Hall, Galway, on St. Patrick’s night, which drew a crowded house.

It was produced by the Gaelic League, and warmly appealed to the Irish love of country and of the old tongue of the heroes, saints and ministries of the long distant past, the programme being entirely in the vernacular, which was fully understood by the audience, each item of song, recitation and dialogue being evidently highly appreciated, and evoking hearty applause.

The spirit of the celebration of the day, which had been shown by the wearing of shamrock and national emblems by the people thronging the streets, dominated the evening assembly, and a more characteristically Irish programme could scarcely have been conceived, nor probably had a more successful entertainment of the kind ever been held in Galway.

Broken faith

It is difficult for Irishmen to believe the sincerity of the expressed desire of the Armed Nations for the freedom of the small peoples, when Ireland’s own demand so variously expressed, both by constitutional and other methods, remains unheeded, and as the facts in regard to the Irish situation become known throughout the world the probability is that they will considerably strengthen the suspicion, with which the Peace Conference, or the possibility of its ultimate issue in a League of Nations for the preservation of the peace of the world, seems to be regarded.

Honey a health food

Honey, writes a medical man, is a food and a medicament of the first rank. It does not irritate the stomach and passes through rapidly, for it is not digested by that organ but rather by the intestines, as are all sugars.

Thanks to the properties in it, it is easily assimilated by the intestines without overloading them for any undue length of time, as is the case with certain ripe fruit.

Besides, it is very nutritious, and nearly every particle of its own weight is assimilated.

The value of celery

Celery is a valuable vegetable, as it is anti-rheumatic and anti-scorbutic. Unfortunately, when it is stewed, the water in which it has been boiled is usually thrown away with all the valuable potash salts which have been dissolved out from it.

The best plan for stewing celery is to boil it in the stock-pot, so that the flavour and valuable mineral matters are conserved in the soup.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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