Galway In Days Gone By

The Ballyturn School Seven team who won the County Galway final of the Coiste Iomána Competition at Craughwell in July 1971 by beating a fancied Leitrim Seven by 6-5 to 2-2. In their six championship matches, in which they disposed of Lurga, Kilchreest, Kilmacduagh, Kiltiernan, Gurrane (Maree) and Leitrim, they amassed a scoring total of 58 goals and 28 points while only conceding 6 goals and 6 points. The members of the team (described in the Tribune at the time as The Magnificent Seven) were (from left) Patrick Martyn, John Broderick, captain, and Patrick Donohue and (back row) Aiden Broderick, Gabriel Mannion, Ger Holland and Stephen Mannion.
The Ballyturn School Seven team who won the County Galway final of the Coiste Iomána Competition at Craughwell in July 1971 by beating a fancied Leitrim Seven by 6-5 to 2-2. In their six championship matches, in which they disposed of Lurga, Kilchreest, Kilmacduagh, Kiltiernan, Gurrane (Maree) and Leitrim, they amassed a scoring total of 58 goals and 28 points while only conceding 6 goals and 6 points. The members of the team (described in the Tribune at the time as The Magnificent Seven) were (from left) Patrick Martyn, John Broderick, captain, and Patrick Donohue and (back row) Aiden Broderick, Gabriel Mannion, Ger Holland and Stephen Mannion.

1919

Unredeemed sacrifice

There has been no more remarkable condemnation of the treachery of the British Government in its dealings with Ireland than that which is contained in the memorial sent to His Majesty the King by 150 Irish officers of various ranks who have served with the army during the war.

Many distinguished Irish names are appended to that document, which has been forwarded through the Prime Minister. A number of the signatories are well and honourably known throughout the West of Ireland.

Most, if not, indeed, all of them have never been politicians but it is clear that they are at one in demanding that the price of the sacrifice they offered in order to free the world from Prussianism is that yoke of Prussianism shall be lifted from their own country, and the pledges of English politicians honoured.

No one, not even Lloyd George, can deny the rights of these men to speak. In the hour of need, they stood loyally by Britain. For over four years they have worn the King’s uniform and saluted his name.

Scandalous treatment

At the weekly meeting of Galway Urban Council on Thursday, Mr. Joseph S. Young, J.P., presided, and the members present were: Messrs. M. J. Crowley, M. Moloney, M. Redington, P. Rabbitt, and M.J. Cooke.

The resolution of the Naas Guardians protesting against the unhuman treatment of the political prisoners in Cork jail, who were stated to have been dragged from their cells and kicked and beaten by warders and soldiers and sailors, and, handcuffed, compelled to eat their food with their mouths to the dish like dogs, was passed unanimously.

Mr. Crowley said the treatment of the prisoners was most scandalous, and was a disgrace to a civilised country: nothing worse could be done by savages.

1944

Problem of nutrition

That the time has come when Galway City must have a child welfare clinic conducted by the Government, is the unanimous opinion of the U.C.G. Women Graduates’ Association, expressed at the conclusion of a lecture on nutrition which Dr. Kathleen O’Brien, Chief School Medical Officer, Dublin Corporation, delivered to the Galway branch of the Association on Saturday night.

The establishment of ante-natal, pre-school and post-primary clinics throughout the country was suggested by various speakers.

Dr. O’Brien, in the course of her lecture, pointed out the need for an assessment of the state of health of the country and indicated the lines on which that assessment should be prepared.

Price on rodents’ tails

A suggestion that Galway County Committee of Agriculture should subsidise a scheme for the destruction of rats by paying fourpence each for rat tails was contained in a letter from the Very Rev. J. Madden, P.P., Killimor, Ballinasloe, which came before a meeting of the Committee on Wednesday.

The Secretary (Mr. B. Ó Suilleabhain) said that in his reply to Father Madden he stated that in his opinion the difficulty would arise in the administration of the scheme. It would be necessary to get somebody to keep a check on the tails, to certify for the amount of reward to be paid and to make sure that the same tails would not be counted more than once.

Mr. J. McKeigue said that rates were causing a lot of damage in the Killimor district.

Tuam full of ruins

A reduction of twopence in the Tuam Town Rate – from 3s. 10d to 3s. 8d. in the pound – was announced by Mr. C. I. O’Flynn, County Manager at a meeting of the Tuam Town Commissioners.

During the course of a discussion on housing the County Manager remarked that Tuam was full of ruins and disused building sites and he did not know of any other town that was as bad in that respect.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.