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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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The Ballyturn School Seven team who won the County Galway final of the Coiste Iomána Competition at Craughwell in July 1971 by beating a fancied Leitrim Seven by 6-5 to 2-2. In their six championship matches, in which they disposed of Lurga, Kilchreest, Kilmacduagh, Kiltiernan, Gurrane (Maree) and Leitrim, they amassed a scoring total of 58 goals and 28 points while only conceding 6 goals and 6 points. The members of the team (described in the Tribune at the time as The Magnificent Seven) were (from left) Patrick Martyn, John Broderick, captain, and Patrick Donohue and (back row) Aiden Broderick, Gabriel Mannion, Ger Holland and Stephen Mannion.

1919

Unredeemed sacrifice

There has been no more remarkable condemnation of the treachery of the British Government in its dealings with Ireland than that which is contained in the memorial sent to His Majesty the King by 150 Irish officers of various ranks who have served with the army during the war.

Many distinguished Irish names are appended to that document, which has been forwarded through the Prime Minister. A number of the signatories are well and honourably known throughout the West of Ireland.

Most, if not, indeed, all of them have never been politicians but it is clear that they are at one in demanding that the price of the sacrifice they offered in order to free the world from Prussianism is that yoke of Prussianism shall be lifted from their own country, and the pledges of English politicians honoured.

No one, not even Lloyd George, can deny the rights of these men to speak. In the hour of need, they stood loyally by Britain. For over four years they have worn the King’s uniform and saluted his name.

Scandalous treatment

At the weekly meeting of Galway Urban Council on Thursday, Mr. Joseph S. Young, J.P., presided, and the members present were: Messrs. M. J. Crowley, M. Moloney, M. Redington, P. Rabbitt, and M.J. Cooke.

The resolution of the Naas Guardians protesting against the unhuman treatment of the political prisoners in Cork jail, who were stated to have been dragged from their cells and kicked and beaten by warders and soldiers and sailors, and, handcuffed, compelled to eat their food with their mouths to the dish like dogs, was passed unanimously.

Mr. Crowley said the treatment of the prisoners was most scandalous, and was a disgrace to a civilised country: nothing worse could be done by savages.

1944

Problem of nutrition

That the time has come when Galway City must have a child welfare clinic conducted by the Government, is the unanimous opinion of the U.C.G. Women Graduates’ Association, expressed at the conclusion of a lecture on nutrition which Dr. Kathleen O’Brien, Chief School Medical Officer, Dublin Corporation, delivered to the Galway branch of the Association on Saturday night.

The establishment of ante-natal, pre-school and post-primary clinics throughout the country was suggested by various speakers.

Dr. O’Brien, in the course of her lecture, pointed out the need for an assessment of the state of health of the country and indicated the lines on which that assessment should be prepared.

Price on rodents’ tails

A suggestion that Galway County Committee of Agriculture should subsidise a scheme for the destruction of rats by paying fourpence each for rat tails was contained in a letter from the Very Rev. J. Madden, P.P., Killimor, Ballinasloe, which came before a meeting of the Committee on Wednesday.

The Secretary (Mr. B. Ó Suilleabhain) said that in his reply to Father Madden he stated that in his opinion the difficulty would arise in the administration of the scheme. It would be necessary to get somebody to keep a check on the tails, to certify for the amount of reward to be paid and to make sure that the same tails would not be counted more than once.

Mr. J. McKeigue said that rates were causing a lot of damage in the Killimor district.

Tuam full of ruins

A reduction of twopence in the Tuam Town Rate – from 3s. 10d to 3s. 8d. in the pound – was announced by Mr. C. I. O’Flynn, County Manager at a meeting of the Tuam Town Commissioners.

During the course of a discussion on housing the County Manager remarked that Tuam was full of ruins and disused building sites and he did not know of any other town that was as bad in that respect.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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Children examine the carcass of a 40-foot sperm whale, beached in Loughaunrone near Oranmore in September 1997. The whale was later burned on the beach as Council engineers were concerned about the danger of seepage if the giant mammal was buried.

1922

Connemara raids

The Publicity Department, Railway Hotel, Galway, issues the following: – Mr. Richard O’Toole, Lettermore, Connemara, has been forced to leave his home as a result of a raid made upon it by irregulars and subsequent threats.

A few nights ago, a party of men came to Mr. O’Toole’s home and demanded his motor bicycle. He refused to give it. The leader of the raiders, tapping his gun, said: “Do you see this?”

“Shoot away,” was Mr. O’Toole’s reply, and the raiders are then said to have gone to the garage to look for the machine. He managed, however, to get the machine, and to make his way to Galway. The men threatened that they would return to his house on the succeeding night and take him.

He was obliged to leave some men to mind his mother, who is very nervous, and falls into a faint when a raid takes place.

The house of Mr. Cloherty at Roundstone was also visited and about £40 worth of stuff taken. Mr. Cloherty is the father of Mr. J. J. Cloherty, a well-known County Councillor, and is a strong supporter of the Treaty.

A shop in Kilkerrin was also raided, and a considerable quantity of goods taken.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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Thatching one of the houses on Shantalla Road, just up from Cooke's Corner, in the 1970s.

1922

The third Dáil

The first meeting of the third Dáil held on Saturday morning last at Leinster House, Kildare-street, the premises of the Royal Dublin Society, recalled for a few minutes some of the stormy scenes at Westminster when Irish affairs were being discussed.

On Saturday, as then, Mr Laurence Ginnell was the central figure. He is apparently always cast for the role of obstructionist in politics, and on Saturday he made full use of his opportunity, with the result that, as at Westminster, he was carried form his seat by three stalwart attendants and expelled from the Assembly.

The Dáil met in the theatre of the house, a semi-circular room with seats rising tier upon tier from an open space in the centre. At the back of the last row of seats there is a promenade, and for some time before the Dáil was due to open, Mr. Ginnell, black band in hand and slouch, hat on head, marched round and round, speaking to no one, but apparently, like an arch conspirator, deep in thought.

Probably he felt lonely, for he was the only one of the anti-treaty members elected to the Dáil who put in an appearance. Miss MacSwiney and the rest, who were known to be in Dublin, have presumably decided to observe a policy of abstention.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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Bridge Mills Ltd building in Galway City in the 1970s.

1922

New chief

General Richard Mulcahy, the successor of the General Michael Collins as Commander-in-Chief of the National Army, was quite unknown to the Irish people until the Insurrection of Easter, 1916, and not very prominent until considerably later than that historic and eventful episode.

He is a native of Carrick-on-Suir, County Waterford, where his father was a postmaster for several years, and he himself was engaged in the postal engineering service in addition to pursuing his studies in the National University as a student of medicine.

He fought with the Fingal Volunteers under Thomas Ashe, and with the late Frank Lawless, T.D., in the battle of Ashbourne on Friday, April 28, 1916. The details of that engagement have often been told. The Volunteers armed with shotguns and rifles, mostly captured from the R.I.C. at Swords and Donabate, attacked the police barracks at the Cross of the Rath.

The battle began at 11.25 a.m. The attackers numbered thirty-five. After half an hour, the police in the barracks were about to surrender when eighteen cars, containing reinforcements, dashed along the Slane Road. A fierce fight ensued. Lawless, with a few more Volunteers, arrived later with two can bombs – “a contribution,” wrote Mulcahy in a most vivid and graphic description of the battle, “from those who had been driven from Phibsboro Bridge.”

That was all the additional help Ashe received. The engagement lasted over three hours more, but though less than forty against a hundred R.I.C., they gained a complete victory. The constabulary were heavily punished, and the survivors put up their hands and surrendered.

At the end of the Insurrection Mulcahy was rounded up and brought to Richmond barracks, Dublin, and on May 3, with 307 other prisoners, he was marched through Dublin and sent over the water to Knutsford prison. He was released at the general amnesty which followed.

When the Volunteers were reorganised, largely in the jails and detention camps, and the Irish war projected, Richard Mulcahy was appointed Chief of Staff, with Michael Collins Chief of the Intelligence Department.

The two of them were the most important men in the great struggle, the life and soul of Ireland’s forces, the originators of some of the most audacious and successful military coups, the supervisors of the chief operations, and the men most sought for by the agents of the British Government and army.

It is very doubtful if, indeed, Mulcahy was not as greatly dreaded and as eagerly hunted for as his departed and devoted comrade in arms. He was quite as successful in eluding the sleuth of hounds as Collins himself, and he had as frequent and as narrow escapes from capture.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

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