Galway In Days Gone By

Leaving Certificate students from the Presentation Convent, Tuam, with their project showing the Old Fish Market at the Spanish Arch in Galway, which won them first prize in the senior section in the Old Galway Society Quincentennial Youth Preject in October 1984. They are: Martina Reynolds, Mary Burke, Marie Mohan (teacher), Maura Fallon and Una Burke.
Leaving Certificate students from the Presentation Convent, Tuam, with their project showing the Old Fish Market at the Spanish Arch in Galway, which won them first prize in the senior section in the Old Galway Society Quincentennial Youth Preject in October 1984. They are: Martina Reynolds, Mary Burke, Marie Mohan (teacher), Maura Fallon and Una Burke.

1919

More than idealism

It is ridiculous to assume that the existing situation in Ireland is altogether the result of causes for which the Irish people are responsible. Yet many people affect to believe that political trouble can be referred entirely to such causes.

The Irish, they say, are too emotional, always rainbow-chasing after some impracticable ideals, given to race hatred, always “agin the law”, and in short endowed in every direction with a double dose of original sin.

It would help more to solve our difficulties if such people would try to discover for themselves whether there may not be more intangible reasons at the root of the matter. For there are such reason, rounded not on vague idealism or fanaticism, but on solid common sense.

If an Irishman say to you, “Why did Great Britain turn the Irish deficit into a surplus of many millions, and refuse to give Ireland some economic benefit by having a fair proportion of war taxation spent in Ireland on munitions?” What reply will you give him?

When an Irishman wonders how it is that Government subsidies can be given to trans-Atlantic lines running to ports in Great Britain; how an immense train-ferry port can be established in an English marsh within a few months; how vast reconstruction schemes can be devised by the Government for the benefit of Great Britain; how in the middle of a world-war, mighty educational reforms can be effected for Great Britain; how British trade and currency can be protected and fostered in every way, while all the time Ireland, which is contributing through her huge surplus taxation to all these benefits and reforms, is unfairly excluded from participating in them, is he to be satisfied with the explanation that his idealism, and his Celtic imagination and other psychological eccentricities render it impossible to enable his country to participate in the material progress of the times?

1944

Pram price controls

The new Order controlling the price of second-hand perambulators, which comes into force on Monday next, will put them beyond the reach of the ordinary working man.

Actually, it is possible to-day to buy new perambulators, complete with all modern fittings, in Galway shops for less than the price that the Minister for Supplies has fixed for second hand vehicles.

Apparently the Order has been provoked by a spate of “pram” profiteering in Dublin where as much as FORTY-EIGHT GUINEAS has been demanded for new perambulators.

The Minister for Supplies has made and order to control the price of perambulators on and from February 7th.

Saved from destruction

The prompt action of two Gardaí on patrol at Barrack-st., at 11.50 p.m. on Friday probably saved the Loughrea Town Hall from destruction by fire.

Attracted by crackling sounds from within the Hall they summoned some neighbouring young men and after breaking a window they forced an entry and found the stage wings and projection screen enveloped in flames which, because of the stormy night, were spreading rapidly.

West is best for wool

Referring to the new prices for wool in the coming season, Mr. C. J. Kearns, President, at the annual meeting of the County Galway Sheep Breeders’ Society in the Agricultural Station, Athenry, on Wednesday, said that the Society had for years past being paying special attention to improving the wool of their stocks and were convinced that their wool now equals in quality that of any other breed in Éire, not even excluding the Oxford Down breed, and consequently should command equal price with the latter.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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