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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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At the Rahoon Hurling Club dinner in the Sacre Coeur Hotel, Salthill, in January 1968 were Thomas Barrett, James Keane, James Davoren, Martin Barrett and Denis Heffernan.

1919

Dock strike ends

The suggestion made by the “Connacht Tribune” last week has speedily borne good fruit.

The strike of members of the Galway Dock Labourers’ and Riverside Workers’ Union, affecting almost every industry in the city, which began on the 14th December, was amicably settled at a meeting at the Mechanics’ Institute on Sunday night.

The most glaring evil of the strike was the cessation of labour in a city whose material interests so largely depend on the daily work and industry of its citizens.

Labourers previous to the strike had 29s. per week in all branches of work in the city. But recently, as a result of an appeal to the Wages Board, the workers at Messrs Palmer’s Mills were on arbitration granted an increase of 7s., or 36s. per week.

The Urban Council offered a like increase to their men, but the offer was refused; and some members, moved by the spectacle of filthy streets and of stagnant trade, spoke strongly in favour of the temporary concession of the full demand, pending the permanent settlement by arbitration.

Bullet smashes window

At midnight on Thursday the police arrested Messrs. M.J. Hoey, Secretary, Tuam Sinn Féin Club; Michael Moran, Carramoneen, and Thomas Dunleavy, Togher, on the public street in Tuam.

Mr. Hoey resisted being searched, and on the advice of Sergeant Martin, Constable Clyne proceeded to load his rifle.

In doing so, it is stated that the rifle got accidentally discharged. The police and civilians were standing at the juncture of Dublin road and Vicar street at the time, and the bullet struck the framework on the side of a plate-glass window in the establishment of Mr. F. Keane, T.C.  went through the stonework, grazed the window, which was smashed, and ricocheted off the glass across the street and pierced the light of Mr. P. Browne’s hardware shop.

1944

Recruits needed

Speaking on Monday night at the annual meeting of the Galway Branch of the Irish Red Cross Society, His Lordship the Most Rev. Dr. Browne, Bishop of Galway, said that as the danger to this country appeared in the popular estimation to diminish, there had been a lowering of interest in the emergency services and a tendency to slack off.

They had in the Galway Red Cross some small drop in the membership of both the Branch and the Divisions, but the vast Majority hold firm.

Egg prices rise

In a letter to Galway County Agricultural Committee at a meeting on Wednesday, the Department stated that the question of increased production of eggs during 1944 was under consideration and that it was intended to improve the classes of poultry both in quantity and breed with a view to developing the industry to meet the great demand for eggs which at present existed and would probably continue for long after the emergency.

During 1944, the price of eggs would be higher than in 1943 and there would be a further improvement in the price in subsequent years if the quantity marketed in 1944 was substantially greater than the sales last year.

£3,000 up in smoke

Almost two tons of tobacco, costing well over £3,000, “goes up in smoke” every year in Ballinasloe Mental Hospital, where over 1,000 ozs. per week is distributed to the patients.

A good portion of the inmates use snuff, and the Chief Clerk informed the committee at the annual meeting that if a “fair” share of tobacco was given, the expenditure would be nearer £5,000.

Tobacco in an institution like a mental home was found to be a strong incentive to getting harmony and discipline among the patients, especially those who worked on the farm.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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"How do Jacob's get the figs into the Fig Rolls?" was a question that captured the imagination of Ireland when it was first used as part of a marketing campaign by Jacob's for their leading biscuit. Jim Figgerty, pictured here with locals in Loughrea on July 3, 1970, was the only man with the answer! Played by actor Patrick Griffin, Jim Figgerty was part of the company's television campaign in the 1960s and early 1970s and visited towns across the country to promote the brand.

1922

The demon drink

The most contemptible of all types of mankind is he who partakes of intoxicating drink throughout the entire day and far into the night. He is never drunk, nor is he ever sober. He is appropriately called a “soaker”.

At the meeting of the Ard-Fheis, Mr. de Valera made a statement which, to those who do not understand the full significance, may not have appeared very germane to the issue. But we are given to understand that his declaration that he was “sorry the drink evil was coming again to the country” was timely, and ought to be followed up with strong action by those upon whom the discipline and good conduct of the Irish people, and the army, which is their servant, depends.

Mr de Valera said he believed he was expressing the united view of every member of the Dáil and of the Officer Board of Sinn Féin when he said that he believed Ireland was really in danger the time the drink evil came back. They wanted the support of the organisation to end that evil, and generally, restore order.

We are informed by clergymen who know rural County Galway and the habits of the people intimately that the young men of to-day do not drink to intoxication, but they have acquired more dangerous habits in certain areas: they “soak” drink for long periods at a time, and their addled minds are, therefore, open to any suggestion of mischief or evil, whilst their power to do honest work such as strong clean men glory in is dulled.

Inevitably, demoralisation follows. We trust that this tale of degeneracy is exaggerated, but we very much fear that it is too true. The fact that Mr. de Valera should make public reference to it at the Ard-Fheis is significant.

“Half the mischief,” a well-known clergyman informs us, “is hatched out at cross-roads public houses by men who spend hours there when they might be doing honest work at home.”

It is well that the country should be aroused immediately to this most insidious of all dangers, for if alcoholic demoralisation should spread, then of a surety the road to utter demoralisation and ruin would be a speedy one to travel, and all the best traditions of our Irish manhood would soon be undermined.

Although we do not, and never have, advocated total abstinence against temperance, better a thousand times that we should lose altogether the liberty to touch intoxicants than that our young men, and, alas, also some of our women, should be reduced to the degrading level of “soakers”.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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Some of those confirmed at Kilmacduagh on May 6, 1970.

1922

Collins interview

Mr. Michael Collins told Mr. John Steele of the “Chicago Tribune” in an interview to which the romantic interest of the head of a new State attaches that he had just returned from the country where he had spent the week-end reading John Mitchell’s account of the American Revolution and the years following.

This might pass, he said, for a history of the present days in Ireland – “there are the same divisions, the same disorders, the same rebellious elements. America won thorough. So shall we.”

Following this optimistic note, the head of the Provisional Government told Mr. Steele that if Mr. de Valera and his followers refuse to cooperate to end the campaign of anarchy, then he is prepared to fight.

But it will not be civil war. It will be simply a police measure. “If this peace effort fails,” he is reported to have said, “then there will be no other. Every avenue of co-operation will have been explored, and we shall have to take strong action to restore order in the country. It is not an easy problem; for a revolutionary Government, in the nature of things, must take some account of motives. There is a lot of plain looting, robbery and violence going on.

“That is common criminality and must be punished. Also, there is a certain amount of commandeering from what, after all, is a patriotic, if misguided motive. That, too, must be stopped; but it requires a different method. Then there is the question of disarmament. There are too many guns in the country – uncontrolled guns, I mean – and they’ve got to be got in. a gun is a dangerous thing for a young man to have. Some day he may use it in a quarrel over a girl, or over a shilling, or over a word. That is one of the problems the revolutionary Government has got to solve, and is determined to solve, but it cannot be done in a day or two.”

He added that Irish people had the right to vote at an election, even if they voted wrongly.

Second bite of apple

The residence of Captain Gardiner, Lismanny, was raided by armed men on Saturday night and a Ford car taken.

It is stated that when visited some time ago, the car could not be taken away as it was out of order and the raiders had to content themselves by taking the wheels.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

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The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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County Galway dancers who won many trophies in competitions over two weeks in June 1967 pictured with their trophies in Eyre Square on June 26, 1967. From left: Breda Keedy, Ballinasloe, who won the shield for the single jig at Athlone Feis, Mary Kelly, Ballinasloe, who won the minor championship (under 11) at Athlone and the minor championship at Drumshambo Feis, Esther McGough, Tuam, who won the under 9 championship at Athlone and Rosemary Mannion, Gort who won the minor competition at Carrickedmund, Co Westmeath and the under 13 competition at Athlone.

1922

Raids and robberies

During the past week a regular epidemic of raids and robberies has taken place in and around East Galway, as a result of which considerable sums of money, jewellery, clothing etc. have been taken away from their owners.

In certain districts scarcely a residence has been immune from the midnight marauders who continue to pursue their nefarious deeds with unrelenting vigour, and in the present state of things, apparently, without fear of detection.

To the least observant, it is obvious that the parties who perpetrate these outrageous are a band who avail of the unsettled condition of affairs now existing, and all right-thinking persons, anxious for the restoration of normal conditions, will earnestly hope that peace will soon come to our distracted land so long torn by internal strife, and that there will soon be an end to crime which tends to disgrace a country once famous for its honour and chivalry.

Home raided

At two a.m. on Sunday morning the residence of Mr. John Cobban, a Presbyterian farmer living at Shanbally, about three English miles from Ballinasloe, was raided by a party of armed and disguised men who arrived in a motor car.

Entrance was affected by breaking a pane of glass in a window through which one of the party got in and opened the door for the others.

The raiders then searched the house, taking with them some jewellery, overcoats, £5 in cash, and a suit of clothes belonging to Mr. John Cobban, junr., and also his watch. Mr. Cobban is a Scotchman who has lived in the district for about fifty years.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

 

 

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