Galway In Days Gone By

The four-day visit to Galway in February 1965 of the Lord Mayor of Birmingham, Ald. Frank Leslie Price, at the invitation of the Galway-Salthill Tourist Development Association created something of a stir in the city. Here he's pictured signing autographs for local youngsters.
The four-day visit to Galway in February 1965 of the Lord Mayor of Birmingham, Ald. Frank Leslie Price, at the invitation of the Galway-Salthill Tourist Development Association created something of a stir in the city. Here he's pictured signing autographs for local youngsters.

1919

Release the prisoners

A largely-attended meeting was held in the Town Hall, Galway, on Sunday, to demand the release of the Irish political prisoners.

Mr. S. M. O’Mara, Mayor of Limerick, who had been announced as principal speaker, was unavoidably absent, and his place was taken by his brother, Mr. James O’Mara, M.P. for South Kilkenny.

Mr. L. E. O’Dea, solr., who presided, said they assembled to protest against the action of the Government in keeping some of the bravest Irishmen from their homes and families and locked in prisons without charge or trial.

Their reason for not bringing them to trial was that they had no charge against them. Mr. Lloyd George and Mr. Shortt brought the lying charge against them that they were engaged in a German plot (applause).

Lord French and Mr Shortt announced that fact immediately after taking up their positions as lord Lieutenant and Chief Secretary.

They persisted in that lie in the House of Commons, and circulated it throughout England and the world.

Roads funding

Mr. Thomas Ruane (Chairman) presided at the quarterly meeting of the Galway District Council on Saturday, at which the following report was submitted by Mr. M. J. Kennedy, Co. Surveyor, and adopted:-

“Considering the inclemency of the weather and the heavy traffic during the past months the roads in your district are in fair order.

The contractors have given fair attention to repairs and the material at their disposal has been used to advantage. The roads in the hands of the County Surveyor have also been looked after and are in repair with the exception of the road from Galway to Tuam, which owing to labour difficulties, has not been as well maintained as I would wish.

However, these difficulties have now been got over and work on this road is proceeding in a satisfactory manner. I have no application for special works.

My estimate for road maintenance in your district for the year ending the 31st March, 1929, is as follows:- Main Roads, £3,990; district roads, £3,140.”

1944

Water supply threat

The mouth of “The Friars’ Cut” – the narrow passage linking Lough Corrib with the River Corrib – was silting up and threatening to constitute a danger to the city water supply, Mr. J. Redington, P.C., told the Galway Corporation on Thursday.

In the past, he said, boats had kept the Cut cleared, but few boats used the Cut now and he was afraid that the silting would eventually interfere with the drainage of water from the lake into the river. He thought that the County Council should take the matter into consideration.

Mr. C. I. O’Flynn, Co. Manager, said that the County Council had nothing to do with drainage. His Worship the Mayor, Ald. J. F. Costello, P.C., who presided, agreed that the Cut was silting up.

Planning a new city

“Whoever gets the job is going to leave a lasting mark on the character of the city,” said Mr. C. I. O’Flynn, Co. Manager, at Thursday’s meeting of the Galway Corporation, when speaking of the desirability of employing the best man available for the planning of the future of Galway.

“The whole future of Galway will depend on his work,” said Mr O’Flynn, “and this is a matter in which we cannot consider the economy as of primary importance.”

The discussion arose when Ald. Owens asked when would the Corporation have an opportunity to discuss the provision of a fair green in the city.

The Co. Manager said that the discussion might be left over until they had got sketch plans from the Town Planner whom he proposed to engage.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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