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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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Tom Duggan as Jack with the Smurffs in a scene from the Renmore Pantomime during rehearsals in December1979 for the show, Jack and the Beanstalk. Front row (from left): Cliona Breathnach, Orina Belton, Leighanna Wright. Second row (from left): Orla Sandys, Aishling McCarthy, Clodagh Lynch, Olga Lynch, Fiona Duggan and Caraine Hughes. Back row (from left): Anne Casserley, Amanda Haverty, Judith Higgins, Emer McCarthy, Sinead Dunleavy and Nessa Cawley.

1918

Red Cross appeal

The question is now being frequently asked, “Now that the war is over, is there any real necessity for the continued support of Red Cross”? The answer is, “The need for funds is greater than ever.”

Red Cross work will continue for at least another twelve months. Casualty lists since last March have been terribly heavy, and consequently the requirements of the wounded men are greater than they ever were. The resources of the Red Cross Societies will be taxed the utmost, especially so as for some months last they have been spending at the rate of £20,000,000 a year more than their income.

In addition to the support needed for transport, hospitals, supplies, etc., there will be the cost of demoralisation, with its many problems. A generous public has enabled the organisation to be built up and maintained, and an appeal is made for further liberal support for the relief of the sufferings of the maimed and broken men.

Influenza spreads

Reports of an alarming character reach us of the grasp which the influenza epidemic has made on several districts west of Galway City. Several families are stricken down in neighbourhood of Oughterard, Moycullen and Spiddal.  Dr. Kennedy O’Brien, medical officer, Oughterard, who has been in constant attendance on cases for several weeks, has reported to the board of guardians of that union that there are twenty-five cases in the hospital.  In the institution itself the cook and wardsmaid are stricken, while Nurse Ely also contracted the epidemic. She had to requisition two additional nurses. At the recent meetings on the various boards of guardians in the county the expense which the epidemic has incurred threatens to fall heavily on the rate-payers.

In Oughterard Union some weeks ago a substitute for Dr. Hearne, who also is a victim, was appointed at the fabulous fee of fifteen guineas a week.

1943

S.V.P sends S.O.S

Following the example of Dublin and other centres, the Galway Conferences of the St. Vincent de Paul Society convened a public meeting on Wednesday night for the purpose of securing greater support and opening a public subscription list.

The great work done for the poor of the city during the past year was described by Alderman J. F. Costello, P.C., Mayor of Galway, who presided at the meeting, which was held in the Chamber of Commerce, and attracted a representative attendance.

In a letter enclosing a cheque for £125, His Lordship, the Most Rev. Dr. Browne, Bishop of Galway, wrote: This winter bodes ill for the poor because of the high price of food and the dearness and scarcity of clothing.”

Gender equality

That the two big political parties in this country had gone away from the spirit of the 1916 Proclamation, which guaranteed equal rights to all citizens, and that their treatment of women was but one more manifestation of the fact, was alleged by speakers at the inaugural meeting of the Galway Branch of the Irish Women Graduates’ Association in U.C.G. on Saturday night.

Mrs. S. O’ Doherty, President of the Branch, who occupied the chair, impressed on graduates the desirability of joining the Association, the annual subscription to which was 5s. She pointed out that the views to be expressed at the meeting did not necessarily represent the policy of the Association; the views were to be given under the aegis of Freedom of Speech.

Mrs. J. Burke said that although women now were free to enter a number of professions much remained to be done to secure decent conditions for them in those professions.

For more,  read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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Children examine the carcass of a 40-foot sperm whale, beached in Loughaunrone near Oranmore in September 1997. The whale was later burned on the beach as Council engineers were concerned about the danger of seepage if the giant mammal was buried.

1922

Connemara raids

The Publicity Department, Railway Hotel, Galway, issues the following: – Mr. Richard O’Toole, Lettermore, Connemara, has been forced to leave his home as a result of a raid made upon it by irregulars and subsequent threats.

A few nights ago, a party of men came to Mr. O’Toole’s home and demanded his motor bicycle. He refused to give it. The leader of the raiders, tapping his gun, said: “Do you see this?”

“Shoot away,” was Mr. O’Toole’s reply, and the raiders are then said to have gone to the garage to look for the machine. He managed, however, to get the machine, and to make his way to Galway. The men threatened that they would return to his house on the succeeding night and take him.

He was obliged to leave some men to mind his mother, who is very nervous, and falls into a faint when a raid takes place.

The house of Mr. Cloherty at Roundstone was also visited and about £40 worth of stuff taken. Mr. Cloherty is the father of Mr. J. J. Cloherty, a well-known County Councillor, and is a strong supporter of the Treaty.

A shop in Kilkerrin was also raided, and a considerable quantity of goods taken.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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Thatching one of the houses on Shantalla Road, just up from Cooke's Corner, in the 1970s.

1922

The third Dáil

The first meeting of the third Dáil held on Saturday morning last at Leinster House, Kildare-street, the premises of the Royal Dublin Society, recalled for a few minutes some of the stormy scenes at Westminster when Irish affairs were being discussed.

On Saturday, as then, Mr Laurence Ginnell was the central figure. He is apparently always cast for the role of obstructionist in politics, and on Saturday he made full use of his opportunity, with the result that, as at Westminster, he was carried form his seat by three stalwart attendants and expelled from the Assembly.

The Dáil met in the theatre of the house, a semi-circular room with seats rising tier upon tier from an open space in the centre. At the back of the last row of seats there is a promenade, and for some time before the Dáil was due to open, Mr. Ginnell, black band in hand and slouch, hat on head, marched round and round, speaking to no one, but apparently, like an arch conspirator, deep in thought.

Probably he felt lonely, for he was the only one of the anti-treaty members elected to the Dáil who put in an appearance. Miss MacSwiney and the rest, who were known to be in Dublin, have presumably decided to observe a policy of abstention.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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Bridge Mills Ltd building in Galway City in the 1970s.

1922

New chief

General Richard Mulcahy, the successor of the General Michael Collins as Commander-in-Chief of the National Army, was quite unknown to the Irish people until the Insurrection of Easter, 1916, and not very prominent until considerably later than that historic and eventful episode.

He is a native of Carrick-on-Suir, County Waterford, where his father was a postmaster for several years, and he himself was engaged in the postal engineering service in addition to pursuing his studies in the National University as a student of medicine.

He fought with the Fingal Volunteers under Thomas Ashe, and with the late Frank Lawless, T.D., in the battle of Ashbourne on Friday, April 28, 1916. The details of that engagement have often been told. The Volunteers armed with shotguns and rifles, mostly captured from the R.I.C. at Swords and Donabate, attacked the police barracks at the Cross of the Rath.

The battle began at 11.25 a.m. The attackers numbered thirty-five. After half an hour, the police in the barracks were about to surrender when eighteen cars, containing reinforcements, dashed along the Slane Road. A fierce fight ensued. Lawless, with a few more Volunteers, arrived later with two can bombs – “a contribution,” wrote Mulcahy in a most vivid and graphic description of the battle, “from those who had been driven from Phibsboro Bridge.”

That was all the additional help Ashe received. The engagement lasted over three hours more, but though less than forty against a hundred R.I.C., they gained a complete victory. The constabulary were heavily punished, and the survivors put up their hands and surrendered.

At the end of the Insurrection Mulcahy was rounded up and brought to Richmond barracks, Dublin, and on May 3, with 307 other prisoners, he was marched through Dublin and sent over the water to Knutsford prison. He was released at the general amnesty which followed.

When the Volunteers were reorganised, largely in the jails and detention camps, and the Irish war projected, Richard Mulcahy was appointed Chief of Staff, with Michael Collins Chief of the Intelligence Department.

The two of them were the most important men in the great struggle, the life and soul of Ireland’s forces, the originators of some of the most audacious and successful military coups, the supervisors of the chief operations, and the men most sought for by the agents of the British Government and army.

It is very doubtful if, indeed, Mulcahy was not as greatly dreaded and as eagerly hunted for as his departed and devoted comrade in arms. He was quite as successful in eluding the sleuth of hounds as Collins himself, and he had as frequent and as narrow escapes from capture.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

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