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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

Stephen Corrigan

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on

Tom Duggan as Jack with the Smurffs in a scene from the Renmore Pantomime during rehearsals in December1979 for the show, Jack and the Beanstalk. Front row (from left): Cliona Breathnach, Orina Belton, Leighanna Wright. Second row (from left): Orla Sandys, Aishling McCarthy, Clodagh Lynch, Olga Lynch, Fiona Duggan and Caraine Hughes. Back row (from left): Anne Casserley, Amanda Haverty, Judith Higgins, Emer McCarthy, Sinead Dunleavy and Nessa Cawley.

1918

Red Cross appeal

The question is now being frequently asked, “Now that the war is over, is there any real necessity for the continued support of Red Cross”? The answer is, “The need for funds is greater than ever.”

Red Cross work will continue for at least another twelve months. Casualty lists since last March have been terribly heavy, and consequently the requirements of the wounded men are greater than they ever were. The resources of the Red Cross Societies will be taxed the utmost, especially so as for some months last they have been spending at the rate of £20,000,000 a year more than their income.

In addition to the support needed for transport, hospitals, supplies, etc., there will be the cost of demoralisation, with its many problems. A generous public has enabled the organisation to be built up and maintained, and an appeal is made for further liberal support for the relief of the sufferings of the maimed and broken men.

Influenza spreads

Reports of an alarming character reach us of the grasp which the influenza epidemic has made on several districts west of Galway City. Several families are stricken down in neighbourhood of Oughterard, Moycullen and Spiddal.  Dr. Kennedy O’Brien, medical officer, Oughterard, who has been in constant attendance on cases for several weeks, has reported to the board of guardians of that union that there are twenty-five cases in the hospital.  In the institution itself the cook and wardsmaid are stricken, while Nurse Ely also contracted the epidemic. She had to requisition two additional nurses. At the recent meetings on the various boards of guardians in the county the expense which the epidemic has incurred threatens to fall heavily on the rate-payers.

In Oughterard Union some weeks ago a substitute for Dr. Hearne, who also is a victim, was appointed at the fabulous fee of fifteen guineas a week.

1943

S.V.P sends S.O.S

Following the example of Dublin and other centres, the Galway Conferences of the St. Vincent de Paul Society convened a public meeting on Wednesday night for the purpose of securing greater support and opening a public subscription list.

The great work done for the poor of the city during the past year was described by Alderman J. F. Costello, P.C., Mayor of Galway, who presided at the meeting, which was held in the Chamber of Commerce, and attracted a representative attendance.

In a letter enclosing a cheque for £125, His Lordship, the Most Rev. Dr. Browne, Bishop of Galway, wrote: This winter bodes ill for the poor because of the high price of food and the dearness and scarcity of clothing.”

Gender equality

That the two big political parties in this country had gone away from the spirit of the 1916 Proclamation, which guaranteed equal rights to all citizens, and that their treatment of women was but one more manifestation of the fact, was alleged by speakers at the inaugural meeting of the Galway Branch of the Irish Women Graduates’ Association in U.C.G. on Saturday night.

Mrs. S. O’ Doherty, President of the Branch, who occupied the chair, impressed on graduates the desirability of joining the Association, the annual subscription to which was 5s. She pointed out that the views to be expressed at the meeting did not necessarily represent the policy of the Association; the views were to be given under the aegis of Freedom of Speech.

Mrs. J. Burke said that although women now were free to enter a number of professions much remained to be done to secure decent conditions for them in those professions.

For more,  read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

Stephen Corrigan

Published

on

Some of the women who attended the Fr Griffin's Social in the Imperial Hotel in December 1965 were (front row, from left): Miss Monica Hanley, Miss Collette Heaney, Mrs Willie Tyrrell, Mrs Paddy Higgins, Mrs C. Crowley and Mrs C. Cunningham. Standing (from left): Mrs T. Higgins, Mrs J. Divilly, Miss Mary Theresa Flaherty, Mrs T. Morrissey, Miss Della Heffernan, Mrs Michael O'Sullivan and Mrs E. Dunne.

1919

Postal delays

Sir – Since early in November the postal authorities have inaugurated “Daylight working of posts,” with the result that we do not get our mails delivered until the morning following their reception at Oughterard Post Office.

Mails reach that office at about 12.40 mid-day, and the post-men (with one exception, the village deliverer) are not despatched until 8 a.m. the following day. This is a great hardship to rural residents, and, personally, I have missed five important meetings through not having received my letters in time.

I live four miles from the local post office, and as I cannot always send in for my mails, I – as well as my neighbours – have to wait for them.

Why are we paying a staff of postmen here if we have to call for and carry our mails? I trust the authorities will remedy affairs at once, and before Christmas, otherwise we shall have “to get questions asked in Parliament.”

I may add that the local post-master is at all times most obliging. These instructions proceed from headquarters.

“A rural resident.”

Oughterard, December 6, 1919.

Farmers’ organisation

The pages of the “Tribune” from week to week afford ample testimony to the progress that is being made throughout the west of Ireland by farmers’ organisations. At the last meeting in Loughrea a suggestion was put forward that, if generally adopted in Ireland, will give these organisations new power and significance.

The proposal that they should be registered under the Trades’ Disputes’ Act was referred to the Farmers’ Union. One gratifying feature about these gatherings is that they afford a common platform whereon all classes of Irishmen can meet and discuss business of mutual concern.

Sir H. Grattan Bellew, who has contributed so much to the industrial life of the district in which he lives, played a very valuable part at the Loughrea meeting. We hope to see men like him playing a greater part in the life of our common country in the future.

Pay and conditions

“In one place in Galway a lot of boys are employed who work sixty-seven hours a week,” said Mr. Seamus O’Brien, organiser, at a meeting of the Irish Transport and General Workers’ Union in the Town Hall, Galway, on Monday night.

Telling of his visit to this factory, Mr. O’Brien said that the manager admitted to him he had girls working for 10s. a week. Mr. O’Brien asked him would he want his own daughter to work for 10s. a week and support herself. “That was a different question,” Mr. O’Brien commented, “but he gave and evasive answer.”

“This fellow happened to sack a lad belonging to the union. He gave several reasons for it. It was not because he belonged to the union or anything like that. It was because the boy was too hard of a worker, I suppose.” There was laughter at Mr. O’Brien’s sarcasm.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

Stephen Corrigan

Published

on

Seventies-style and sophistication on show at the Autumn Fashion Show in Leisureland in September 1975.

1919

Disgraceful conditions

A report was forwarded through the Local Government Board, from Mr. Pack Beresford, on the condition of the labourers’ houses in Aughrim.

It showed they were in a most disgraceful way, without any sanitary accommodation and little better than hovels.

Fr Coughlan in a letter to the Local Government Board drew attention to the unsanitary, unchristian and savage conditions under which the poor labourers of Aughrim had to live.

As it was Fr. Dan Coughlan brought the matter up first, the Council returned their thanks to him, and it was decided to take steps to have proper houses built.

Economic danger

The country is at present passing through a period in its economic history which is full of dangers. There is a sinister tinge of irony in the reflection that a war, that has brought sorrow and devastation on many peoples and many lands, has brought wealth and prosperity to other people and other lands.

In a small measure, relatively speaking, the Irish farmer has been able to share in that prosperity. The demand for increased food production and his own efforts and industry have succeeded, during these terrible years, in finding bread and work for himself and his children.

In the result, both have lived in comparative comfort. To-day, America is seeking out immigrants who shall be good citizens and capable workers. The State Emigration Department of Washington is looking towards Ireland.

It does not want anarchists of revolutionaries from southern Europe. And of all the heterogeneous company that crowds into the States, the Irish emigrants make the best and most reliable citizens.

The difficulties of securing passports are rapidly disappearing. The day is drawing nearer when our young men and women, if they are not given a decent incentive to secure bread at home, will pour forth in thousands to the land where ten million Irish have found a home.

Water complaints

Complaints from all sides as to the City’s water supply were heard at the meeting of the Galway Urban Council yesterday (Mr. J. S. Young presiding).

First there was a letter from the Dominican Convent, Taylor’s Hill, about the insufficiency of the supply to the Convent.

The Town Steward (Mr. Molloy) said the tank in the convent was filled every night, but that it was wasted very soon. There were 200 people in the place.

Mr. Cooke thought it was a great surprise that after spending so much money on their new waterworks’ system that there should be a shortage. – “It is extraordinary,” agreed the Chairman.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

Stephen Corrigan

Published

on

At the Pres Galway Bon Voyage Ball in 1975 were (from left): Mary Higgins, Colmcille Road, Shantalla; Teresa O'Connell, Oughterard; Carrie Walsh, Fairlands Park, Newcastle; Ann Keating, Fairlands Park; and Eleanor Coyne, Davis Road, Shantalla.

1919

Essential publicity

At the conclusion of the quarterly meeting of Galway County Council on Wednesday of last week, the question of the county advertising was discussed. The subject came up at the end of a three hours’ sitting, the great part of which was concerned with demands for increases in salaries.

In fact, if these demands had been cut out, there would be very little County Council left! But the attendance had petered away, and scarcely a quorum was left to decide whether the Council should or should not advertise its various activities in the principal newspapers in County Galway.

The attitude of these remaining members was decidedly friendly and intelligent. But the attitude of the two principal officials of the Council, both of whom took part in the discussion, deserves careful examination.

For it has to be remembered that without publicity – adequate and full publicity – a representative money-spending authority must cease to function healthily as such and may become a danger and a menace to the community.

Moreover, a cardinal principal of democracy is undermined by the refusal to adopt or frankly to submit to such publicity, and the most vicious form of bureaucracy is enthroned in its stead.

Let there be no mistake on this point. We have already seen how necessary. how absolutely essential, is the fullest and frankest publicity in relation to the administration of public bodies in County Galway. It is therefore of relatively greater significance when It concerns the premier spending authority.

Pay increase

Last evening, Mr. E. P. Harte, organiser of the Dock Labourers’ Union, with Mr. P. Garvey, chairman of the branch, and Mr. W. Flaherty, secretary, met the Employers Federation in conference, Mr. Martin McDonogh in the chair, and as a result of an interchange of views an all-round increase of 4s. was granted for all classes of men, with the exception of the workers in the flour mills who have recently had an advance under the Government scheme.

The proceedings were most cordial, and the utmost good-will was displayed on both sides. This brings the wages of the ordinary worker up to £2 5s. 6d. weekly.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app

The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

 

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