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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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Tom Duggan as Jack with the Smurffs in a scene from the Renmore Pantomime during rehearsals in December1979 for the show, Jack and the Beanstalk. Front row (from left): Cliona Breathnach, Orina Belton, Leighanna Wright. Second row (from left): Orla Sandys, Aishling McCarthy, Clodagh Lynch, Olga Lynch, Fiona Duggan and Caraine Hughes. Back row (from left): Anne Casserley, Amanda Haverty, Judith Higgins, Emer McCarthy, Sinead Dunleavy and Nessa Cawley.

1918

Red Cross appeal

The question is now being frequently asked, “Now that the war is over, is there any real necessity for the continued support of Red Cross”? The answer is, “The need for funds is greater than ever.”

Red Cross work will continue for at least another twelve months. Casualty lists since last March have been terribly heavy, and consequently the requirements of the wounded men are greater than they ever were. The resources of the Red Cross Societies will be taxed the utmost, especially so as for some months last they have been spending at the rate of £20,000,000 a year more than their income.

In addition to the support needed for transport, hospitals, supplies, etc., there will be the cost of demoralisation, with its many problems. A generous public has enabled the organisation to be built up and maintained, and an appeal is made for further liberal support for the relief of the sufferings of the maimed and broken men.

Influenza spreads

Reports of an alarming character reach us of the grasp which the influenza epidemic has made on several districts west of Galway City. Several families are stricken down in neighbourhood of Oughterard, Moycullen and Spiddal.  Dr. Kennedy O’Brien, medical officer, Oughterard, who has been in constant attendance on cases for several weeks, has reported to the board of guardians of that union that there are twenty-five cases in the hospital.  In the institution itself the cook and wardsmaid are stricken, while Nurse Ely also contracted the epidemic. She had to requisition two additional nurses. At the recent meetings on the various boards of guardians in the county the expense which the epidemic has incurred threatens to fall heavily on the rate-payers.

In Oughterard Union some weeks ago a substitute for Dr. Hearne, who also is a victim, was appointed at the fabulous fee of fifteen guineas a week.

1943

S.V.P sends S.O.S

Following the example of Dublin and other centres, the Galway Conferences of the St. Vincent de Paul Society convened a public meeting on Wednesday night for the purpose of securing greater support and opening a public subscription list.

The great work done for the poor of the city during the past year was described by Alderman J. F. Costello, P.C., Mayor of Galway, who presided at the meeting, which was held in the Chamber of Commerce, and attracted a representative attendance.

In a letter enclosing a cheque for £125, His Lordship, the Most Rev. Dr. Browne, Bishop of Galway, wrote: This winter bodes ill for the poor because of the high price of food and the dearness and scarcity of clothing.”

Gender equality

That the two big political parties in this country had gone away from the spirit of the 1916 Proclamation, which guaranteed equal rights to all citizens, and that their treatment of women was but one more manifestation of the fact, was alleged by speakers at the inaugural meeting of the Galway Branch of the Irish Women Graduates’ Association in U.C.G. on Saturday night.

Mrs. S. O’ Doherty, President of the Branch, who occupied the chair, impressed on graduates the desirability of joining the Association, the annual subscription to which was 5s. She pointed out that the views to be expressed at the meeting did not necessarily represent the policy of the Association; the views were to be given under the aegis of Freedom of Speech.

Mrs. J. Burke said that although women now were free to enter a number of professions much remained to be done to secure decent conditions for them in those professions.

For more,  read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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An image of the then walled Salthill Park captured in the 1950s or 1960s.

1921

No show in Mountbellew

We have no doubt that the decision to abandon the Mountbellew Horse and Agricultural Show for 1921 was only arrived at by the committee after full consideration.

Possibly it was unavoidable in the present disturbed state of the country. It is nonetheless regrettable for since that fixture was first established in 1904 it has proved a most valuable factor in promoting agriculture and industries in one of the most extensive and important areas of County Galway.

The show ranked amongst the most important in Ireland. Year by year it extended its usefulness, and its practical value was marked by an increased grant from the County Committee of Agriculture.

For the present season this grant is lost. We may hope that in the happier Ireland of 1922 the show will be revived on a greater and grander scale than ever. The committee closes its accounts this year with a surplus credit of £182, and a record of public service that cannot be gainsaid.

The tribute to Mr. J. Moran upon his laying down of the office of secretary will be cordially supported by all who have had experience of that energetic worker, whose advice and assistance in an honorary capacity will, we hope, still remain at the service of the society.

First aid training

It is a little astonishing that an elementary training in first aid has not formed part of the curriculum of our primary and secondary schools.

Accidents happen in the best regulated families and communities from one cause or another, particularly nowadays because of heavy motor traffic and other causes. If a little knowledge of first aid were more general, a life could, perhaps, be saved if immediate assistance were available pending skilled medical aid.

It is, unfortunately, true that very few people know how to treat temporarily a fractured limb, to stop the bleeding of an artery, or to deal with a patient in case of sudden collapse. Instead of many subjects now taught, some at least of which are but little practical value, all school-going boys and girls should get at least an elementary course in first aid.

It is a desirable and necessary subject which our education authorities should give serious attention, as the training given remains of practical value all through life.

“What greater aim can man attain than conquest over human pain?”

It is a great and privileged gift to be able to bring useful relief to a poor sufferer in an accident – perhaps to staunch ebbing life blood and to save a life. Yet the knowledge could and should be acquired in our national schools.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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During an ESB power strike in April 1972, petrol pumps had to be operated with a winder, but Declan Forde of Prospect Hill, Gawlay City, found a more novel way of doing it - using a bicycle. The back tyreless wheel of the bicycle was connected to the pump by a belt, with the pedals rotating as petrol was pumped. Declan commented at the time: "This unique method brought us more customers, because by using the bike we pumped the petrol three times faster than the ordinary ESB current." Also in the photograph are Pat Kenehan (right) watching Joe Flaherty operate the pump.

1921

Bad buying policy

It is interesting and useful to speculate how far the conditions that prevailed at Galway great annual fair on Tuesday and Wednesday of this week were due to its postponement on the one hand, and to the circumstances of our time on the other.

No doubt, the enforced adjournment and the uncertainty as to when the fair would be held combined to reduce the attendance.

It is possible that stock which, in the ordinary course, would have been taken to the fair had it been held at the appointed time, were disposed of by other means. Against this we have the fact that the fixture in point of attendance and sales was smaller than a normal monthly fair.

The truth is that cumulative causes contributed to its partial failure. Of these the postponement was only incidental. Only 159 wagon loads of stock left Galway during the two days against 259 at the annual fair last year and 360 the previous year.

Whilst the Midland Great Western Railway Company did all that could have been expected in the circumstances to assist in making the fair a success, the Great Southern did practically nothing at all. Six wagons were placed at the disposal of purchasers by the latter company on the Limerick-Sligo branch.

This is illustrated by the fact that most of those who attended Galway fair arrived on the evening before; few ventured to make the journey on the actual morning of the fair. Again, buyers report that owing to the difficulties of transport, and the recent unnecessary foot and mouth scare, they cannot tranship cattle to anything like the same extent as formerly, and owning to the prolonged drought, there is a shortage of grass for grazing in the rich midland counties where extensive buyers keep their stock from one fair to the other.

Apart from these causes, another much more interesting explanation is given. It is suggested is that the country farmer has not yet realised that there is a considerable drop in prices, and has not adapted himself to the new conditions.

This fall, it is clamed, is likely to be retrogressive under present conditions. The cost of living is falling, and must fall still further in order to restore “the economic balance”. Yet farmers prefer to hold back their stock in expectation, apparently, that something like old prices will be restored, rather than part with them. This, a cattle-buying expert informs us, is bad policy.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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High fashion at the Athenry Show on September 2, 1972.

1921

Careless farmers

The unfavourable spring and summer of 19230 were not altogether accountable for the partial failure of last season’s potato crop. Planting was deferred until three or four weeks after the usual time, and the spraying of the crop was very carelessly carried out.

Not more than half the usual quantities of spraying materials were sold last year in County Galway. The wagon loads of potatoes which County Galway consumers were obliged to get from other parts of Ireland to go to prove the care and attention taken from growers in other counties.

To meet the increased cost of labour and manures farmers must grow heavier crops, and avoid risks as far as possible. To do so, spraying must be carried out efficiently.

County Galway, with 24,000 Irish acres of potatoes, is the second county in Ireland in respect of area. The total yield in 1920 was about 100,000 tons below that of an average year, which was a serious loss to the farmers and a hardship on the townspeople.

We hope that the lesson of 1920 will not be forgotten, and that farmers will this year spray in time and thoroughly.

One of the farmer’s chief difficulties is keeping of his crops free from weeds. Unfortunately in this important matter some of our farmers are rather careless. They do not realises – probably through lack of education in the matter – that where a crop is allowed to get weedy, the material resources of the land are being doubly taxed, and the crop which it is intended to grow cannot be a viable, much less a financial success.

The farmer has no power over some of the circumstances which determine the success or failure of a crop, and it is, therefore, a short-sighted policy for him not to use every means in his power to check weeds over which he has complete control.

Our attention has been directed to this matter by the number of cornfields in some districts, which are covered with the weed well-known to farmers as “Baráiste”.

We cannot estimate the extent of the damage caused year after year to our corn crops, but it must be very considerable. The yield of gran is greatly reduced, and the quality seriously impaired.

Modern science has given us a simple, effective, remedy involving little labour. This remedy has been used successfully for some years past by the best of our farmers, but we deeply regret the lack of enthusiasm displayed by many of our tillers in connection with the destruction of this objectionable weed.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

 

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