Galway In Days Gone By

Tom Duggan as Jack with the Smurffs in a scene from the Renmore Pantomime during rehearsals in December1979 for the show, Jack and the Beanstalk. Front row (from left): Cliona Breathnach, Orina Belton, Leighanna Wright. Second row (from left): Orla Sandys, Aishling McCarthy, Clodagh Lynch, Olga Lynch, Fiona Duggan and Caraine Hughes. Back row (from left): Anne Casserley, Amanda Haverty, Judith Higgins, Emer McCarthy, Sinead Dunleavy and Nessa Cawley.
Tom Duggan as Jack with the Smurffs in a scene from the Renmore Pantomime during rehearsals in December1979 for the show, Jack and the Beanstalk. Front row (from left): Cliona Breathnach, Orina Belton, Leighanna Wright. Second row (from left): Orla Sandys, Aishling McCarthy, Clodagh Lynch, Olga Lynch, Fiona Duggan and Caraine Hughes. Back row (from left): Anne Casserley, Amanda Haverty, Judith Higgins, Emer McCarthy, Sinead Dunleavy and Nessa Cawley.

1918

Red Cross appeal

The question is now being frequently asked, “Now that the war is over, is there any real necessity for the continued support of Red Cross”? The answer is, “The need for funds is greater than ever.”

Red Cross work will continue for at least another twelve months. Casualty lists since last March have been terribly heavy, and consequently the requirements of the wounded men are greater than they ever were. The resources of the Red Cross Societies will be taxed the utmost, especially so as for some months last they have been spending at the rate of £20,000,000 a year more than their income.

In addition to the support needed for transport, hospitals, supplies, etc., there will be the cost of demoralisation, with its many problems. A generous public has enabled the organisation to be built up and maintained, and an appeal is made for further liberal support for the relief of the sufferings of the maimed and broken men.

Influenza spreads

Reports of an alarming character reach us of the grasp which the influenza epidemic has made on several districts west of Galway City. Several families are stricken down in neighbourhood of Oughterard, Moycullen and Spiddal.  Dr. Kennedy O’Brien, medical officer, Oughterard, who has been in constant attendance on cases for several weeks, has reported to the board of guardians of that union that there are twenty-five cases in the hospital.  In the institution itself the cook and wardsmaid are stricken, while Nurse Ely also contracted the epidemic. She had to requisition two additional nurses. At the recent meetings on the various boards of guardians in the county the expense which the epidemic has incurred threatens to fall heavily on the rate-payers.

In Oughterard Union some weeks ago a substitute for Dr. Hearne, who also is a victim, was appointed at the fabulous fee of fifteen guineas a week.

1943

S.V.P sends S.O.S

Following the example of Dublin and other centres, the Galway Conferences of the St. Vincent de Paul Society convened a public meeting on Wednesday night for the purpose of securing greater support and opening a public subscription list.

The great work done for the poor of the city during the past year was described by Alderman J. F. Costello, P.C., Mayor of Galway, who presided at the meeting, which was held in the Chamber of Commerce, and attracted a representative attendance.

In a letter enclosing a cheque for £125, His Lordship, the Most Rev. Dr. Browne, Bishop of Galway, wrote: This winter bodes ill for the poor because of the high price of food and the dearness and scarcity of clothing.”

Gender equality

That the two big political parties in this country had gone away from the spirit of the 1916 Proclamation, which guaranteed equal rights to all citizens, and that their treatment of women was but one more manifestation of the fact, was alleged by speakers at the inaugural meeting of the Galway Branch of the Irish Women Graduates’ Association in U.C.G. on Saturday night.

Mrs. S. O’ Doherty, President of the Branch, who occupied the chair, impressed on graduates the desirability of joining the Association, the annual subscription to which was 5s. She pointed out that the views to be expressed at the meeting did not necessarily represent the policy of the Association; the views were to be given under the aegis of Freedom of Speech.

Mrs. J. Burke said that although women now were free to enter a number of professions much remained to be done to secure decent conditions for them in those professions.

For more,  read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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