Galway In Days Gone By

Pictured at the Clifden Fine Gael dinner in January 1970 were Mrs Sadie Goonan, Glenard Crescent, Salthill (seated), Mrs Doris Mannion, Clifden, Mrs Joan Spelman, Loughrea, Miss Ida McEvilly, Newcastle, Galway and Miss Margaret Doherty, Newcastle.
Pictured at the Clifden Fine Gael dinner in January 1970 were Mrs Sadie Goonan, Glenard Crescent, Salthill (seated), Mrs Doris Mannion, Clifden, Mrs Joan Spelman, Loughrea, Miss Ida McEvilly, Newcastle, Galway and Miss Margaret Doherty, Newcastle.

1918

Armistice celebrations

Galway received the news of peace in the early hours of Monday morning with unfeigned joy. Soon the city was agog with excitement; the bells of the Protestant Church of St. Nicholas were pealed, and the docks and other public buildings were decorated with flags.

The daily papers were eagerly bought up, but disappointment was expressed that they contained no news of the armistice, the fact being, of course, that the negotiations were not completed till too late an hour to make an announcement.

Aeroplanes flew over the town in the clear sunlight. In the evening a general spirit of good honour and hilarity prevailed and tar barrels were procured by the Connaught Rangers and bonfires lighted in Eyre square and Middle-street.

With the exception of a single incident, in which a window of Mr. M. T. Donnellan’s establishment was broken by two sailors, who were celebrating the coming of peace not too wisely but, too well, everything passed off quietly.

At night a most successful peace dance, in which over forty couples participated, was held in the Town Hall.

Ashplant assault

At the Ballinasloe Petty Sessions on Saturday, Wm. Casey, a tramp, was charged with seriously assaulting his mother with an ashplant.

In reply to the District Inspector, Lea, Mrs. Casey stated that as a result of the blow, she was three weeks in hospital.

Replying to the bench as to why he committed the assault, Casey said his mother was drunk and aggravated him.

The Chairman said it was a very bad case, and they would send the defendant to prison for three months with hard labour.

An appeal was made by the mother to reduce the sentence. Her son was only coming from hospital where he was laid up with pneumonia.

Chairman: We will let the sentence stand. He will be well looked after in prison.

1943

Ration book offence

At Galway Court on Thursday, before Acting District Court Justice O’Reilly, Peggy Connolly, Grattan Lodge, Grattan Road, Galway, was charged with unlawfully retaining a ration book belonging to her brother, Patrick, who had gone to England.

John Connolly, her brother, was charged with making illegal use of the ration book. – Mr. R. J. Kelly, State Solicitor, appeared for the Minister of Supplies, and Mr. J. C. O’Donnell, Galway, appeared for the Connollys.

Mr Kelly said that Patrick Connolly left this country on April 10th. His sister, Peggy, kept his ration book and John drew twenty-six weeks’ supplies of tea and sugar on the book. There was also a number of clothes coupons missing.

When the Connolly’s were questioned by the Guards they admitted that they kept the ration book and said that they did not know the gravity of their action. They also stated that they were expecting Patrick to return home before long.

Mr. O’ Donnell said that the facts of the case were as Mr. Kelly had stated. The defendants, who were not yet twenty years of age, did not know the gravity of keeping and using this ration book. Some of the clothes for which they used the coupons were sent to England to Patrick. The District Justice dismissed the case under the Probation of Offenders’ Act.

For more,  read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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