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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

Stephen Corrigan

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St Michael's National School, Mervue, Gaelic Football team who defeated city rivals St Patrick's School by 2.4 to 08 in the final of the National Schools B City League at Pearse Stadium in May 1975. Front row (from left): J O'Connor, K Lally (captain), M Mulvany, C Conneely, T Walsh, F Kenny, J Healy. Back row: F Sheridan, C O'Kelly, B Power, P Coppinger, S Coughlan, P O'Dowd, N Greaney and R Ryan.

1918

Abandoned promotion

A feeling akin to consternation was aroused in Carna last week on the rumoured change of the Rev. M. McHugh, the pastor of the parish, to another portion of the archdiocese. On Thursday week, a meeting of the parishioners was held, and a deputation appointed to wait on his Grace the Archbishop with a view to securing the cancellation of Father McHugh’s transfer.

The deputation proceeded to Tuam, and were cordially received by his Grace, who kindly consented to leave the matter entirely in the hands of Father McHugh’s parishioners.

On their return, the deputation interviewed Father McHugh, who decided to forego the well-merited promotion and remain with the parishioners, amongst whom he has laboured for over a quarter of a century. Father McHugh’s decision has given immense satisfaction in the parish.

R.I.C. to down tools?

With reference to the Parliamentary Bill for the purpose of increasing the pay of police, it is understood that the force in Co. Galway are determined, in the event of the Bill being not put through before the dissolution, to take certain action during the General Election in conjunction with their colleagues all over Ireland.  This action is not named, but the purport of the threat can readily be guessed, and it is obvious that if the police resort to the drastic measure of downing tools during the excitement of the General Election, chaos might easily result.

Student to be charged

Mr. J.J. Comer, student, University College, who is in custody in collection with the disturbances at Captain Alston’s lecture on October 1, is recovering from the “flu”, and will be charged at the petty sessions on Monday. It is stated that a quantity of ammunition and drill books were found amongst the property of one of the others now undergoing imprisonment for participating in the scenes on the same occasion.

1943

Child hurt in accident

Cecily Wilson (6½), daughter of Mr. and Mrs. C. Wilson, St. Ann’s, Father Griffin Road, Galway, was injured when a plate glass window in Messrs. F. Gleeson and Sons’ draper shop was broken on Tuesday evening when a motor car collided with a hand cart at the Four Corners.

The motor car, which came from Gort, was proceeding in the direction of Shop Street and as it was passing the Four Corners, it hit against a handcart, the property of Messrs. McCambridge Ltd., which was being pushed from the direction of lower Abbeygate Street by Peter Quirk, a messenger boy employed by Messrs. McCambridge.

The handcart spun around and went through the window, and young Wilson, who was passing accompanied by her mother, was injured. She was taken into Greally’s Medical Hall where her injuries were dressed. She was later taken to the Central Hospital and was discharged after receiving medical attention.

Better planning

When Ald. Brennan drew the attention of Mr. C.I. O’Flynn, County Manager, at Thursday’s meeting of Galway Corporation, to the condition of a road leading off the Father Griffin Road, the County Manager said that the road in question was an example of the type of place where building work should not have been permitted. People had built houses in places where there were no roads and then turned to the Corporation with a request that they should be provided with roads, sewerage and water supplies. Professor Dillon and others in Lenaboy had set a good example by contributing money towards the making of a road leading to their houses.

Street lighting

It was agreed by Galway Corporation that an inspection should be made of certain parts of the city with a view to having the lighting system revised before the next public lighting contract was signed. Ald. Miss Ashe and Messrs. Carrick and Redington referred to the need for lights at Prospect Hill, St. Nicholas’s-street, Rosemary Avenue, Fairhill and Parkaveera. The County Manager said that the city saved about £900 per year by the reduction in the lighting.

The meeting unanimously adopted a resolution from the Longford Urban Council protesting against the increase of ten per cent in the charge for electricity.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

Stephen Corrigan

Published

on

Teatime on the Morrissey Farm in Clonshee, Ahascragh in June 1951. Pictured beside the mowing machine and horses Charlie and Bly is John Morrissey with six of his 12 children, Joseph, Seán, Eileen, Michael, Annie and Willie.

1921

Growing neglect

The meeting of the County Galway National Teachers’ Association merits the attention of a considerably wider body than that which may be said to have a professional interest in education.

These meetings, which are held primarily for purposes of organisation, have an absorbing interest and a vital concern for all who desire the future well-being of our young people.

Whilst conditions of employment must naturally be an important concern for primary teachers, Saturday’s meeting revealed the fact that their minds are exercised by the deplorable and growing neglect of primary education.

The statement of the outgoing chairman that out of seven hundred thousand school-going children, there are two hundred thousand absentees from the national schools every day; this compels immediate attention and demands effective action on the part of all whose duty it is to enforce attendance at school.

That means that nearly one-third of the pupils are absent from school daily. There could be no graver reflection on the parent, the public bodies and their school attendance committees and the spiritual directors than that thirty out of every one hundred pupils are absent from the schools every day.

“Do the people,” as the chairman asked, “realise the havoc such a state of things works amongst us as a nation? Is it any wonder that so many of our countrymen and countrywomen are condemned to a life of drudgery, bordering upon a condition of slavery, at home and abroad.”

In recent years we have heard much of the attractiveness of school programmes, but the obvious inference from this lamentable disclosure would appear to be that children dislike that “dry drudgery at the desk’s dead wood,” or that they are neither encouraged nor compelled by their parents or guides to thread the path of learning.

Whatever the cause, the fact is a national scandal.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

Stephen Corrigan

Published

on

Flooding in front of the Spanish Arch and Galway City Museum on November 11, 1977.

1921

What the public wants

Apart from the fact that to permit young children to remain up late in the heavy atmosphere of a picture theatre is detrimental to their health, there can be little objection to children seeing pictures – provided always they are the right kind of picture.

Recently, we have had a surplus of war propaganda pictures. The world is heartily sick of the game of killing and all its hideous trappings. We want to turn the young minds to the victories of peace, to the ways of high endeavour and moral greatness, to replace sordid meanness and intrigue with sterling honour and openness of the soul.

Stories of the crude justice of the Wild West are scarcely calculated to do this, any more than the hectic and neurotic ethical standard set up in silly serials may be supposed to direct the young idea along the paths that are best in life.

And we want happy, healthy laughter. The comedy pictures are perhaps the least objectionable. Bud Fisher stands alone, perhaps, in the great work he has done for humanity. But why should not filmmakers and scenario writers gather more from the old classical novels and the best stories from modern writers, from all that is noble and of good report, and less from the ugly things in life?

We suppose, as in the case of the yellow Press, so long as war and tragedy are “good selling lines” the film producers will “play them up”. In other words, they will give the public what it wants and therefore, what it deserves.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

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Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

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The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

 

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

Stephen Corrigan

Published

on

A dog joins in the action during and AIB League game between Galwegians and Bective Rangers at Crowley Park in 1998. Photo: Joe O'Shaughnessy.

1921

Money drying up

In calling the quarterly meeting of the Galway County Council for Wednesday next, February 16, the secretary makes the grave announcement that “if the rate is not struck it is unlikely that any further payments can be made to boards of guardians, district councils, asylum, or labourers – in other words, the machinery of local government in County Galway will have completely broken down”.

The statutory meetings of the proposals committee and council called for Wednesday, the 2nd inst., fell through for want of a quorum, this being the third occasion within two months in which the premier body of the county failed to hold a regularly-constituted meeting.

It is but fair to point out, however, that upon the last occasion, a bare quorum would have been available but for the arrest of the members on their way to the council chamber.

On the day following the last abortive attempts to hold a meeting recently, the secretary issued a letter in which he stated that he was requested by seven members who had attended “to impress upon all members whose services are still available” the necessity for attendance, “even at great inconvenience”.

The Council on Wednesday next will find itself faced with a heavy responsibility, but it is a responsibility that grows heavier for every day that those charged with it refuse to face.

House burning

On Sunday morning the dwelling-house of Mr. Mtn. Coyne, farmer, Kiltrogue, Claregalway, was burned to the ground.

Miss Coyne (sister of the owner), a servant boy, and three children of Mrs. Frank Hardiman, Galway (another sister), were the only occupants of the dwelling at the time.

They were suddenly awakened at about 1.30 a.m. by a loud knocking at the door. When the door was opened a party of men rushed in and ordered them out, adding that they were about to burn the house.

Partially dressed, the little household left, and the place was immediately set on fire. The occupants are since being sheltered by neighbours.

On the same night the dwelling-house of Mr. W. Mulroyan, Killtulla, Castlegar; the haggards of Thomas Fallon, Two-Mile-Ditch, Castlegar, and Luke Ryan, Castlegar, were also destroyed.

The burnings are variously stated to be a sequel to the Kilroe ambush and to the raiding of the Galway-Tuam mail car.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

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