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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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Mary Street, Galway in 1977, at its junction with Eglinton Street and Francis Street. Cullinane's Lounge Bar is on the left and Maloney's shop on the right.

1914

Reckless drivers

At the Galway City Petty Sessions, Head Constable Killacky summoned Patk Concannon for driving on the wrong side of the road, and for furious driving, on the night of the 15th inst. Defendant is a local jarvey.

Complainant said defendant drove on the wrong side of the road, within a foot of the path. Two soldiers were standing beside the path, and as they had not time to get out of the way, one of them was struck by the wheel of the car.

Witness added that the drivers of Galway were absolutely reckless, particularly going to and coming from the trains. Defendant was fined 5s. in each case.

Gallant Galway man

Amongst the long list of names mentioned in the Field-Marshal Sir John French’s now-famous despatches for conspicuous bravery in the field, Galway people have noticed with gratification and pride that of Lieut. C.C. Holmes, of Lincolnshire Regiment.

Lieutenant Holmes is a son of Mr. R.W. Holmes, of Claregalway, and has a brother serving with the Grand Fleet in the sister service. The young officer was some time ago reported missing, but everyone will join in the earnest prayer that this gallant Irish soldier may turn up safe and well.

1939

Garda cutbacks

It is strongly rumoured that a number of garda barracks in Connemara will be closed shortly under the Government’s economy drive, and the districts vacated will be divided up among the adjoining garda districts, Leenane, Carraroe, and Roundstone or Carna, are some of the stations about when the rumours circulate.

The authorities, however, should consider the matter carefully before taking any steps in the direction stated, of the proposed economy might only prove a false one.

European liner terminal?

Our Special Dublin Correspondent writes: If this war goes on, and I fear it will, Galway may become the terminal port in Europe for American liners before many months. Everything will depend on the success of the German aerial war on British ships and ports.

The American Government appear to think that at any moment German aircraft are to be expected, if not off the south coast of Ireland, in force, at least near the entrance to the English Channel, where very determined attacks may be made on vessels bound for any of the Channel ports.

American ships have been accordingly warned. Against this, German craft in those waters would certainly be attacked from both the French and British shores, for to get to their objective they would have to fly for hundreds of miles within easy reach of either shore and would, therefore, be very heavily attacked.

The Germans, so far, have refrained from attacks in this quarter, possible for the reason that the dangers and risk of big losses are considered great.

American ships are also stated to regard the port of Liverpool as one of danger, and the “narrow seas” off our south coast are definitely in the danger zone, according to American reckoning.

Galway is, therefore, pointed to as the best and safest port outside the danger zones.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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Looking into the future at Ballinasloe Fair in the early 1990s.

1922

Ballinasloe Show

Ballinasloe District Agricultural Show, held on Monday last, was a splendid success. Favoured by ideal weather, the attendance was a record one. Despite expectations to the contrary, the number of exhibits in every department was well up to the average, and in the cattle and sheep sections the number of entrants was nearly double that of any show held within the past few years, while the all-round quality of the exhibits showed a marked improvement and surpassed anything previously exhibited at the show.

Were it not for the postal strike, the exhibits would have been largely augmented, but taking everything into consideration, the show was indeed a very creditable one. In the horse section, the exhibits were remarkably good, and the judges had a very trying time in arriving at decisions. This can also be said of the cattle section, where the entrants were numerous and the quality particularly good.

Worthy of special note were the vegetables, the quality, despite the unfavourable season, being extra good – some of the exhibits being as good as any seen at the Dublin Show.

Not only was the arrangement good, but in the opinion of the judges, the quality was extremely good. The exhibits of fruit, though not plentiful, were very creditable to the exhibitors.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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1922

Scabs warning

An exciting incident in connection with the postal strike occurred at Mary-st., Galway, at four o’clock last Saturday afternoon.

An official of the Galway Electric Lighting Company, Ltd., accompanied by another official, had gone to the central post office at Eglinton-street to collect the letters of the company. Shortly after he had left, it was alleged that he had taken other letters for delivery in Mary-street on his way back to the works.

The strike picket immediately gave chase, and an exciting scene, which was witnessed by a number of people in the street, followed.

The officials of the company were chased into the licensed premises of Mr. J. S. Young, but it could not be found that they had delivered any letters.

“We did not see them delivering any letters,” said one of the strikers. “Anyhow, an undertaking has been signed now not to attempt to deliver any to other people.”

A few national soldiers in uniform were standing at the Eglinton-street end of Mary-street during the incident. Four lady members of the staff at the Galway central office returned to work on Saturday and were understood to be engaged upon sorting of letters recently delivered by road.

It is stated that letters are also being posted at the central boxes. Meanwhile the picket remains almost continuously “on duty” outside the office, in front of which two boards have been place, one stating, “Don’t take letters from scabs”; and another “Restricted Services – Four do the work of forty-two”.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

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The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

 

 

 

 

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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Children examine the carcass of a 40-foot sperm whale, beached in Loughaunrone near Oranmore in September 1997. The whale was later burned on the beach as Council engineers were concerned about the danger of seepage if the giant mammal was buried.

1922

Connemara raids

The Publicity Department, Railway Hotel, Galway, issues the following: – Mr. Richard O’Toole, Lettermore, Connemara, has been forced to leave his home as a result of a raid made upon it by irregulars and subsequent threats.

A few nights ago, a party of men came to Mr. O’Toole’s home and demanded his motor bicycle. He refused to give it. The leader of the raiders, tapping his gun, said: “Do you see this?”

“Shoot away,” was Mr. O’Toole’s reply, and the raiders are then said to have gone to the garage to look for the machine. He managed, however, to get the machine, and to make his way to Galway. The men threatened that they would return to his house on the succeeding night and take him.

He was obliged to leave some men to mind his mother, who is very nervous, and falls into a faint when a raid takes place.

The house of Mr. Cloherty at Roundstone was also visited and about £40 worth of stuff taken. Mr. Cloherty is the father of Mr. J. J. Cloherty, a well-known County Councillor, and is a strong supporter of the Treaty.

A shop in Kilkerrin was also raided, and a considerable quantity of goods taken.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

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