Classifieds Advertise Archive Subscriptions Family Announcements Photos Digital Editions/Apps
Connect with us

Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

Published

on

A snapshot of a very different Galway from the early 1960s, long before the city centre streets were pedestrianised.Not only was traffic allowed on the street then, but it went both ways – and parking was allowed too. Long gone now are the double decker buses which ran between Eyre Square and Blackrock in Salthill, staffed by a driver and a conductor.

1914

Trespasser damage

At the City Petty Sessions, John Sullivan, Fairhill, Galway prosecuted Mary Clancy for the trespass of two goats on his cabbage garden, causing damage to the plants which he estimated at 10s. In his evidence, complainant stated that he had two other women summoned for a similar offence, but they had each settled by paying him 5s. 6d., which included costs. A decree for 5s. and costs was granted.

Rejected from the ‘Front’

William Higgins was summoned by Constable Hazlett for using obscene language on a public street. Mr. P.J.B. Daly, solr., who appeared for the defendant, said it was eighteen months since his client had “graced” the magistrates.

He had also volunteered for the front, but he was rejected. A sister of the defendant stated she had four brothers at the front, and when the defendant returned from Dublin after being rejected, they both indulged in some drink. Defendant was fined 1s.

Ranger returns

Corpl. Patrick Warde, Moylough, has returned from the seat of war, after an absence of four months. He told a correspondent that the Connaughts gained many victories during the fighting, and proved that they were of a fighting race.

He admitted they had a difficult task before them in their retreat from Mons, but there was one thing brought them consolation, and that was the heroism and bravery displayed by their gallant regiment.

He stated that the Germans were only formidable when they took you unawares. He does not look upon the Germans as brave individually, but he admits them for their discipline, and willingness to go wherever duty calls them.

Their last move in Flanders was a great failure. They foolishly undertake things beyond their strength. Corpl. Warde is attached to the Commissariat, and bears all testimony to the fact that all wants are carefully attended to.

1939

Ornamental TDs

When Galway Corporation at their weekly meeting in the City Hall were considering reports regarding flooding in Mill-street and Nuns’ Island, Mr. J.S. Young remarked in connection with a suggestion that the county T.D.s be asked to ascertain where the responsibility lay, that they should be made do something for their money. He added that they were only ornaments.

Scott medal for garda

Garda Daniel J. Manley, Milltown, who received a bronze Scott medal award at the Depot, Dublin, on Monday for bravery in the discharge of his duty, was stationed in Tuam when, on August 27, 1938, at 1am, he was on patrol duty with Garda Curran and they apprehended a man holding a single barrelled shot gun.

He turned his torch on the man and although he could not have known whether the gun was loaded or not, he took the risk and seized the gun. The man was arrested and subsequently sentenced to a period of imprisonment.

Adverse weather

The heavy rain for many weeks past have caused hige flooding in many areas in East and South Galway, and these floods are becoming more and more menacing.

Large pastures lie under water and livestock had to be removed to higher levels in many places and hand-fed. The gathering of beet and other root crops has been temporarily retarded in places. Roads in some districts are impassable. Prices for turf have increased owing to the difficulties of getting to the turf.

Death of apparition witness

It is with feelings of deep regret that we record the death, which took place recently, of Mrs. Bridget Murray Kavanagh, widow of the late Mr. John Kavanagh, of Baltimore, Maryland.

Deceased was born in Tuam, County Galway, the daughter of the late Patrick and Mary Roche Murray. She often stated that as a young girl, she had witnessed the apparition of the Blessed Virgin at Knock.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

Published

on

Looking into the future at Ballinasloe Fair in the early 1990s.

1922

Ballinasloe Show

Ballinasloe District Agricultural Show, held on Monday last, was a splendid success. Favoured by ideal weather, the attendance was a record one. Despite expectations to the contrary, the number of exhibits in every department was well up to the average, and in the cattle and sheep sections the number of entrants was nearly double that of any show held within the past few years, while the all-round quality of the exhibits showed a marked improvement and surpassed anything previously exhibited at the show.

Were it not for the postal strike, the exhibits would have been largely augmented, but taking everything into consideration, the show was indeed a very creditable one. In the horse section, the exhibits were remarkably good, and the judges had a very trying time in arriving at decisions. This can also be said of the cattle section, where the entrants were numerous and the quality particularly good.

Worthy of special note were the vegetables, the quality, despite the unfavourable season, being extra good – some of the exhibits being as good as any seen at the Dublin Show.

Not only was the arrangement good, but in the opinion of the judges, the quality was extremely good. The exhibits of fruit, though not plentiful, were very creditable to the exhibitors.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

 

Continue Reading

Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

Published

on

1922

Scabs warning

An exciting incident in connection with the postal strike occurred at Mary-st., Galway, at four o’clock last Saturday afternoon.

An official of the Galway Electric Lighting Company, Ltd., accompanied by another official, had gone to the central post office at Eglinton-street to collect the letters of the company. Shortly after he had left, it was alleged that he had taken other letters for delivery in Mary-street on his way back to the works.

The strike picket immediately gave chase, and an exciting scene, which was witnessed by a number of people in the street, followed.

The officials of the company were chased into the licensed premises of Mr. J. S. Young, but it could not be found that they had delivered any letters.

“We did not see them delivering any letters,” said one of the strikers. “Anyhow, an undertaking has been signed now not to attempt to deliver any to other people.”

A few national soldiers in uniform were standing at the Eglinton-street end of Mary-street during the incident. Four lady members of the staff at the Galway central office returned to work on Saturday and were understood to be engaged upon sorting of letters recently delivered by road.

It is stated that letters are also being posted at the central boxes. Meanwhile the picket remains almost continuously “on duty” outside the office, in front of which two boards have been place, one stating, “Don’t take letters from scabs”; and another “Restricted Services – Four do the work of forty-two”.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

 

 

 

 

Continue Reading

Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

Published

on

Children examine the carcass of a 40-foot sperm whale, beached in Loughaunrone near Oranmore in September 1997. The whale was later burned on the beach as Council engineers were concerned about the danger of seepage if the giant mammal was buried.

1922

Connemara raids

The Publicity Department, Railway Hotel, Galway, issues the following: – Mr. Richard O’Toole, Lettermore, Connemara, has been forced to leave his home as a result of a raid made upon it by irregulars and subsequent threats.

A few nights ago, a party of men came to Mr. O’Toole’s home and demanded his motor bicycle. He refused to give it. The leader of the raiders, tapping his gun, said: “Do you see this?”

“Shoot away,” was Mr. O’Toole’s reply, and the raiders are then said to have gone to the garage to look for the machine. He managed, however, to get the machine, and to make his way to Galway. The men threatened that they would return to his house on the succeeding night and take him.

He was obliged to leave some men to mind his mother, who is very nervous, and falls into a faint when a raid takes place.

The house of Mr. Cloherty at Roundstone was also visited and about £40 worth of stuff taken. Mr. Cloherty is the father of Mr. J. J. Cloherty, a well-known County Councillor, and is a strong supporter of the Treaty.

A shop in Kilkerrin was also raided, and a considerable quantity of goods taken.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Continue Reading

Local Ads

Local Ads

Advertisement
Advertisement

Facebook

Advertisement

Trending