Classifieds Advertise Archive Subscriptions Family Announcements Photos Digital Editions/Apps
Connect with us

Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

Published

on

Galway city, December 1966: A teeming Market Street in Galway thronged by shoppers buying the festive goose or turkey, plus the trimmings, at the Christmas market.

1914

Connaught Rangers in action

Private J. Sweeney, 2nd. Battalion, Connaught Rangers, who has just returned to his home at Keelogues, near Creggs, Co. Galway, wounded from the front, gives an interesting account of his experiences.

Pte Sweeney is a special reserve man, and has had the unique experience of serving under three crowned heads – Queen Victoria, King Edward, King George. In his early life he took part in several engagements in India, including the famous Tibet Expedition under Col. Sir Blindon Blood.

When the present war broke out, he at once joined his old regiment, and went out with the first expeditionary force under General Sir John French.

After landing in France, he says, we immediately proceeded northwards, ultimately reaching the Allies’ lines as they were retiring from Mons. My regiment took part in numerous other engagements during that retreat, and although a good many were killed and wounded, still we accounted for a good many Germans.

We made an exceptional stand against overwhelming numbers on the banks of the Aisne. For nine weeks, we were entrenched along the river side and notwithstanding the fierce attacks both day and night by the Germans, we held our own.

The heavy artillery fire of the Germans was very effective, and the accuracy with which they found range was most remarkable. With the rifle they are practically useless, and the British troops score wonderfully in bayonet charges.

The Germans have a holy horror of the bayonet, and fly in the most cowardly manner when charged. I took part in the battle of Sedan. For several days there was continuous, fierce fighting. The Germans were constantly dropping their shells in our midst, our position being accurately gauged by their aeroplanes.

These aeroplanes are damnable things, and it is extremely hard to evade them. Many of them were brought down, but it was no easy task to do so. It was subsequent to the battle of the river Marne, while on the march, that I got wounded by a shell bursting close to our ranks, a portion of which cut me deeply on the thigh.

In hospital, both doctors and nurses were very kind. I was on active service for about 26 weeks, and can bear personal witness to the fact that the Scots’ Greys, the Coldstreams, the Connaught Rangers and the Irish Guards acquitted themselves with great bravery on the battlefield.

1939

Cruelty is rare

Speaking at the annual meeting of the Galway branch of the National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children, his lordship, Most Rev. Dr. Browne, Bishop of Galway said the work of the Society was a work that should appeal to all religious, charitable and humane people.

Anyone who had any experience of life knew that children suffered intensely in body and in mind from cruelty or neglect. The children were God’s most dear and innocent creatures and anyone who tried to protect them was doing Christ-like work.

“Fortunately,” said his lordship, “in this country, deliberate cruelty is rare. But neglect arising from drunkenness or from laziness or from misfortune through death of a parent or loss of property is frequent.

“When they find cases, it is not true that the inspectors bring them all into court, as we can see. Out of 134 cases dealt with affecting 445 children, only three cases were prosecuted.

“The object of the Society is to try to meet each case in the most humane and tactful way possible. It is not true that it is the policy of the Society to run all children into an institution.”

Dancing by candlelight

A large portion of Galway was plunged into darkness at about 9.40 on Sunday night when the electric current failed and the performances in the Town Hall and Savoy Cinemas were brought to an abrupt ending.

A dance which had been in progress in the Galway Rowing Club at Woodquay was also held up for some time, but dancing continued in candlelight.

Officials of the E.S.B. found that the trouble had been caused by a piece of copper wire being thrown over the mains and Woodquay and full lighting was restored inside an hour. Gardaí are investigating the matter.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

Published

on

An image of the then walled Salthill Park captured in the 1950s or 1960s.

1921

No show in Mountbellew

We have no doubt that the decision to abandon the Mountbellew Horse and Agricultural Show for 1921 was only arrived at by the committee after full consideration.

Possibly it was unavoidable in the present disturbed state of the country. It is nonetheless regrettable for since that fixture was first established in 1904 it has proved a most valuable factor in promoting agriculture and industries in one of the most extensive and important areas of County Galway.

The show ranked amongst the most important in Ireland. Year by year it extended its usefulness, and its practical value was marked by an increased grant from the County Committee of Agriculture.

For the present season this grant is lost. We may hope that in the happier Ireland of 1922 the show will be revived on a greater and grander scale than ever. The committee closes its accounts this year with a surplus credit of £182, and a record of public service that cannot be gainsaid.

The tribute to Mr. J. Moran upon his laying down of the office of secretary will be cordially supported by all who have had experience of that energetic worker, whose advice and assistance in an honorary capacity will, we hope, still remain at the service of the society.

First aid training

It is a little astonishing that an elementary training in first aid has not formed part of the curriculum of our primary and secondary schools.

Accidents happen in the best regulated families and communities from one cause or another, particularly nowadays because of heavy motor traffic and other causes. If a little knowledge of first aid were more general, a life could, perhaps, be saved if immediate assistance were available pending skilled medical aid.

It is, unfortunately, true that very few people know how to treat temporarily a fractured limb, to stop the bleeding of an artery, or to deal with a patient in case of sudden collapse. Instead of many subjects now taught, some at least of which are but little practical value, all school-going boys and girls should get at least an elementary course in first aid.

It is a desirable and necessary subject which our education authorities should give serious attention, as the training given remains of practical value all through life.

“What greater aim can man attain than conquest over human pain?”

It is a great and privileged gift to be able to bring useful relief to a poor sufferer in an accident – perhaps to staunch ebbing life blood and to save a life. Yet the knowledge could and should be acquired in our national schools.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Continue Reading

Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

Published

on

During an ESB power strike in April 1972, petrol pumps had to be operated with a winder, but Declan Forde of Prospect Hill, Gawlay City, found a more novel way of doing it - using a bicycle. The back tyreless wheel of the bicycle was connected to the pump by a belt, with the pedals rotating as petrol was pumped. Declan commented at the time: "This unique method brought us more customers, because by using the bike we pumped the petrol three times faster than the ordinary ESB current." Also in the photograph are Pat Kenehan (right) watching Joe Flaherty operate the pump.

1921

Bad buying policy

It is interesting and useful to speculate how far the conditions that prevailed at Galway great annual fair on Tuesday and Wednesday of this week were due to its postponement on the one hand, and to the circumstances of our time on the other.

No doubt, the enforced adjournment and the uncertainty as to when the fair would be held combined to reduce the attendance.

It is possible that stock which, in the ordinary course, would have been taken to the fair had it been held at the appointed time, were disposed of by other means. Against this we have the fact that the fixture in point of attendance and sales was smaller than a normal monthly fair.

The truth is that cumulative causes contributed to its partial failure. Of these the postponement was only incidental. Only 159 wagon loads of stock left Galway during the two days against 259 at the annual fair last year and 360 the previous year.

Whilst the Midland Great Western Railway Company did all that could have been expected in the circumstances to assist in making the fair a success, the Great Southern did practically nothing at all. Six wagons were placed at the disposal of purchasers by the latter company on the Limerick-Sligo branch.

This is illustrated by the fact that most of those who attended Galway fair arrived on the evening before; few ventured to make the journey on the actual morning of the fair. Again, buyers report that owing to the difficulties of transport, and the recent unnecessary foot and mouth scare, they cannot tranship cattle to anything like the same extent as formerly, and owning to the prolonged drought, there is a shortage of grass for grazing in the rich midland counties where extensive buyers keep their stock from one fair to the other.

Apart from these causes, another much more interesting explanation is given. It is suggested is that the country farmer has not yet realised that there is a considerable drop in prices, and has not adapted himself to the new conditions.

This fall, it is clamed, is likely to be retrogressive under present conditions. The cost of living is falling, and must fall still further in order to restore “the economic balance”. Yet farmers prefer to hold back their stock in expectation, apparently, that something like old prices will be restored, rather than part with them. This, a cattle-buying expert informs us, is bad policy.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

 

Continue Reading

Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

Published

on

High fashion at the Athenry Show on September 2, 1972.

1921

Careless farmers

The unfavourable spring and summer of 19230 were not altogether accountable for the partial failure of last season’s potato crop. Planting was deferred until three or four weeks after the usual time, and the spraying of the crop was very carelessly carried out.

Not more than half the usual quantities of spraying materials were sold last year in County Galway. The wagon loads of potatoes which County Galway consumers were obliged to get from other parts of Ireland to go to prove the care and attention taken from growers in other counties.

To meet the increased cost of labour and manures farmers must grow heavier crops, and avoid risks as far as possible. To do so, spraying must be carried out efficiently.

County Galway, with 24,000 Irish acres of potatoes, is the second county in Ireland in respect of area. The total yield in 1920 was about 100,000 tons below that of an average year, which was a serious loss to the farmers and a hardship on the townspeople.

We hope that the lesson of 1920 will not be forgotten, and that farmers will this year spray in time and thoroughly.

One of the farmer’s chief difficulties is keeping of his crops free from weeds. Unfortunately in this important matter some of our farmers are rather careless. They do not realises – probably through lack of education in the matter – that where a crop is allowed to get weedy, the material resources of the land are being doubly taxed, and the crop which it is intended to grow cannot be a viable, much less a financial success.

The farmer has no power over some of the circumstances which determine the success or failure of a crop, and it is, therefore, a short-sighted policy for him not to use every means in his power to check weeds over which he has complete control.

Our attention has been directed to this matter by the number of cornfields in some districts, which are covered with the weed well-known to farmers as “Baráiste”.

We cannot estimate the extent of the damage caused year after year to our corn crops, but it must be very considerable. The yield of gran is greatly reduced, and the quality seriously impaired.

Modern science has given us a simple, effective, remedy involving little labour. This remedy has been used successfully for some years past by the best of our farmers, but we deeply regret the lack of enthusiasm displayed by many of our tillers in connection with the destruction of this objectionable weed.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

 

Continue Reading

Local Ads

Local Ads

Advertisement
Advertisement

Facebook

Advertisement

Trending