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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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The rundown Town Hall cinema in 1990, years before its transformation into the Town Hall Theatre of today. Showing in the Town Hall 1 was the American comedy Honey I Shrunk the Kids, and the musical comedy Earth Girls are Easy in the Town Hall Mini. The building, which first opened its doors in 1825 as the city's courthouse, was to close in 1993, with the refurbished Town Hall Theatre opening in 1995.

1915

‘Seduction’ case

At Galway Quarter Sessions, Thomas Feerick sued Luke Connolly, Milltown, for damages for the alleged seduction of his sister. Mr. Concannon appeared for the plaintiff and Mr. McCormack (instructed by Mr. McDonogh, solr.) for defendant.

Miss Feerick said that on December 3, 1913, she met defendant near her brother’s house and he seduced her. They kept company on various occasions in February.

In May, she knew something was wrong with her, and she asked the defendant what he was going to do and he said that he would see that she would be all right, and promised to marry her, but she never saw him afterwards.

To Mr McCormack: Witness said it was at Christmas she knew she was in trouble. She was 28 years of age. She agreed to marry the defendant if he got rent receipts in his own name.

If he got the fortune, he said he would marry her. The parish priest, she heard, spoke publicly from the altar about the occurrence. He complained to her and her brother about the house they kept.

Connolly, the defendant, denied the charge. Father Diskin, the parish priest, when witness went to him, said he “would see him out of it”.

In cross-examination by Mr. Concannon, witness denied that he had ever even a conversation with the girl.

The case was adjourned to the following Thursday.

1940

Egg trade ruined

With the Department of Agriculture regulations regarding the marketing of eggs, Connemara has received its worst blow yet from the application of nationwide legislation to that area.

As a result of these new regulations, the egg trade has now been completely ruined in Connemara. In the course of enquiries throughout the area last week, our correspondent failed to find one rural shopkeeper who had not discontinued to handle eggs.

It appears that the shopkeepers do not object to paying the required registration fee of £1, but they find it impossible to comply with the regulation requiring them to market the eggs within two days.

Heretofore, lorries did rounds of all the rural shops in Connemara, at intervals of ten days, or maybe a week and collected all the eggs.

Under the new regulations, these lorries would have to call every second day. This, of course, would be unprofitable to the big egg dealers with whom the rural shopkeepers used to trade. The result has been that the egg lorries have ceased to call to the shops, and the shops in turn have ceased to take their eggs from their customers.

Country subsistence

One of the big mysteries at the moment in Connemara is how the families of relief scheme workers in the area manage to subsist on a net income of 13s. 7d. per week.

The average-sized family in places like Recess, Cashel, Carna and Rosmuc is composed of the father and mother and from eight to ten young children. Such a family will consume a sack of flour in a week costing 24s.

If we allow one pound of tea and five pounds of sugar, the weekly outlay totals about 29s. Butter and other odds and ends, including tobacco, would add an extra ten shillings, making a total of 39s. at a very conservative estimate.

Thus, the deficit in the domestic budget would amount to £1 5s. 11d. per week. Could any financial wizard tell us how this deficit is met? Is it any wonder that we have a decline in marriages and births and that the countryside is being abandoned.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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A winner at Ballybrit in July 1964 is led back by its owner and connections.

1922

Civil War impact

Had Ireland enjoyed the blessings of peace this year, the summer and autumn of 1922 would have stood out in our annals as a period when we had entered upon the first stages of real prosperity and welcomed the Irish from overseas to the shores of a free land.

Thousands of Americans came in the earlier part of the season. They had wallets full of money, which they were willing and anxious to spend amongst the people of their own land. To their dismay and keen disappointment, they found Ireland in a state of war.

A holiday in the ordinary sense was out of the question. Many of them turned to the highlands of Scotland; others went to Oberammergau, and other parts of the Continent; some turned westward again.

The daily Press has been full of the impressions of these visitors. Some of them had gone through experiences which tinged these impressions with rankling bitterness. We can imagine what they will say when they return home!

Ireland has lost by this fratricidal strife morally as well as materially, and the tragedy is that the loss has yet to be fully accounted, and that it comes upon a nation that has just secured its freedom after a struggle of centuries and at a time when we need all the wealth and work we can secure for national reconstruction.

It is now a matter of doubt whether Galway race meeting can be held this year, as those interested are not keen on courting a failure that would lower the prestige that Ballybrit has won.

Wait goes on for light

The proposed scheme for electric lighting of the town of Athenry has been temporarily postponed owing to the present condition of the country. The proposed capital was to be £3,000, £2,100 of which was to be subscribed by seven directors, while the rest was to be got from shareholders. It is expected that the project will be re-mooted as soon as opportunity offers.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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Taking it all in at the Galway Races in 1964.

1922

Economic war

The Irish Minister for Local Government has issued letter to each parish priest and public representative calling attention to the fact that the operators of the irregulars assume more and more distinctly the character of war upon the economic life of the Irish people. Bridges are being broken and roads obstructed all over the country.

In many places the railways have been cut and traffic interrupted. Within the last few days sections of the canals have been drained off. Mr. Cosgrove says that these acts do not prevent the progress of National troops, do not even seriously impede the transport of military supplies.

They are effective only against the civilian population, preventing the proper distribution of flour, foodstuffs, causing generally great hardship and, in some cases, actual starvation; hindering the dispatch of livestock and farm produce into the customary markets and inflicting losses on the agricultural community.

The Minister goes on to point out the unemployment stagnation, and cumulative distress that must follow such acts, and declares that the economic weapon is being used to force the people to reject the Treaty and enter upon a hopeless and unnecessary war with England.

Gaelic revival 

If Ireland be wise, and her sons do not throw her back into a whirl of chaos and anarchy and lay her once more an easy prey to conquest, the Gaelic revival is assured within the lifetime of the present generation.

Our children will soon be using their own tongue as the medium of learning the arts and sciences: though it will be disclosed to them the knowledge of other peoples and lands, and of the things that concern their own.

Our Gaelic contribution on page two this week is an inspiring study. Apart from the material aspect that 560 teachers studying at local centres have in small measure compensated for the loss of the races, the fact has emerged that Galway can become the greatest centre of Gaelic culture in Ireland.

The ceilidhthe and scoraidheachta held at various centres have been the wonder and delight of our visitors, some of whom have come from the Capital of the “Black North” to learn their mother tongue at its fountain head.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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The late Mick lally as school teacher Raphael Bell in a scene from the Galway International Arts Festival and Macnas production of Patrick McCabe's ‘The Dead School’ during the festival in July 1998. Photo: Joe O'Shaughnessy

1922

Unemployment dangers

There is considerable truth in the declarations recently made from more than one platform that unemployment is at the root of present Irish troubles.

The placing of a considerable proportion of the male population of military age and fitness on a military basis will not, unfortunately, aid in the immediate solution of this trouble.

Many have become not a little alarmed at the reserve territorial scheme advertised by the Irish Government, whereby those who volunteer for six months’ service will be permitted to retain their rifles afterwards.

The people of Ireland have said in language that no amount of casuistry can alter that they do not want any more militarism; they want to settle down to years of strenuous work to build up the country.

Further destruction and political manoeuvring with the torches and rifles in hand can only make that task practically impossible, further swell the ranks of the unemployed, and end in anarchy.

To stave off this, the Irish Government has had recourse to the methods mentioned but it should have a care lest it might err by swinging over to the other side. Its mandate is to demilitarise the country, and to reap the glorious benefits that await us in the years of peace that we all hope lie ahead.

Half the economic problems that created such trouble in England, and, indeed, in all countries after the war, were due to the fact that young men, half schooled or half learned in a trade, went into the trenches, and left the army grown men without profession, trade, or employment, unfitted for anything, full of the discontent that life under such conditions in the army breeds, and disinclination to entre civil life as honest workers.

It is easy to destroy – any fool or criminal can do that. The build up requires constant application, hard toil, moral courage, and brain power. These are the qualities we need in the Ireland of to-day.

Burning bridges

Portumna Bridge, the connecting link between Tipperary and Galway, which cost £100,000 to erect, is reported to have been blown up on Thursday.

The bridge on the main road to Ahascragh was blown up. It is now being repaired, all the male residents forming a civic guard. The enrolment of a similar is being contemplated in Ballinasloe.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

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