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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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The Long Walk in Galway City as it looked in 1984, an area which has undergone huge transformation since this photo was taken.

1915

Lusitania sunk

“We are not fighting men, but reptiles – cunning, treacherous and envenomed.” So commented a popular illustrated paper on Monday in demanding that, after the devilish feat of sinking the Lusitania, with its human freight of innocent victims, the Germans should be tried as common criminals.

Up to Monday, 1,452 souls, practically all composed of innocent non-combatants, have, off the peaceful shores of Ireland, been sacrificed to German frightfulness.

Although the first torpedo was sufficient to finish the great vessel, which cost a million and a half, the savages fired another, and yet another torpedo in order to complete her destruction instantaneously, and ensure that she would not be able to make for shore.

The assassin blow was so sudden that escape was well nigh impossible, and the liner, getting a bad list, only one section of her lifeboats could be launched. Within practically 20 minutes, the palatial boat, from which no comfort or convenience that ingenuity could suggest or man’s hand prepare was absent, was at the bottom of 60 fathoms of water.

Down with her, imprisoned, went hundreds upon hundreds of innocent victims, and we are told by survivors that the submarine came to the surface for a moment in order to give its foul murderers an opportunity of gloating over the struggles of hundreds of others in the seething wages. And the only result is red raw murder, for the material loss, as the Cunard Co. Tell us, is fully covered by insurance.

Naturally, the whole civilised world shudders at the black deed, and a cry for vengeance has gone up. Not one nation attempts to defend the assassin who, by this crowning crime, outrivals the most atrocious act of savages known to history.

Even a section of the German people cannot find support for the barbarous act, though the Huns generally proclaim it as “a new triumph for Germany’s naval policy”.

1940

Idle unemployed

At a meeting of Ballinasloe Urban Council, the town clerk said it was deplorable that five unemployed men who were offered plots refused to take them. The plots were free – only a nominal sum of 1s. per year being charged.

Implements, seeds and manures as well as spraying material and expert advice on the cultivation and care of the plots were also free.

The chairman, Mr. M. Connolly, said there were no excuses whatever for these idle young men in refusing these plots.

Coal shortage

The effects of shortage of coal and other necessities since the outbreak of war have been instanced by letters read from the contractors to Ballinasloe mental hospital, who requested management to cancel their contracts owing to the difficulties in continuing supplies.

Extra supplies of turf will be cut and saved to counteract any shortage of supplies of coal for the coming season. The committee of management have their own turbary and have their own labour and transport services in the hospital.

Clash in West Galway

There are a number of members of the Fine Gael party who do not like the decision of the leaders not to contest the Galway election. Their attitude is that nothing can be gained in any direction by not fighting Fianna Fáil.

Foreign games ban

The ban imposed on St. Joseph’s College, Ballinasloe, by the Galway County Education Committee has been removed. Originally the Galway County Council, parent body of the committee, banned St. Joseph’s from participation in the county scholarships scheme on the grounds that rugby was played there, but recently a scholarship to that school was allowed and the committee, seeing that the principle was not being adhered to, felt that the name of St. Joseph’s should be included in the list of approved schools for scholarship purposes.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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An image of the then walled Salthill Park captured in the 1950s or 1960s.

1921

No show in Mountbellew

We have no doubt that the decision to abandon the Mountbellew Horse and Agricultural Show for 1921 was only arrived at by the committee after full consideration.

Possibly it was unavoidable in the present disturbed state of the country. It is nonetheless regrettable for since that fixture was first established in 1904 it has proved a most valuable factor in promoting agriculture and industries in one of the most extensive and important areas of County Galway.

The show ranked amongst the most important in Ireland. Year by year it extended its usefulness, and its practical value was marked by an increased grant from the County Committee of Agriculture.

For the present season this grant is lost. We may hope that in the happier Ireland of 1922 the show will be revived on a greater and grander scale than ever. The committee closes its accounts this year with a surplus credit of £182, and a record of public service that cannot be gainsaid.

The tribute to Mr. J. Moran upon his laying down of the office of secretary will be cordially supported by all who have had experience of that energetic worker, whose advice and assistance in an honorary capacity will, we hope, still remain at the service of the society.

First aid training

It is a little astonishing that an elementary training in first aid has not formed part of the curriculum of our primary and secondary schools.

Accidents happen in the best regulated families and communities from one cause or another, particularly nowadays because of heavy motor traffic and other causes. If a little knowledge of first aid were more general, a life could, perhaps, be saved if immediate assistance were available pending skilled medical aid.

It is, unfortunately, true that very few people know how to treat temporarily a fractured limb, to stop the bleeding of an artery, or to deal with a patient in case of sudden collapse. Instead of many subjects now taught, some at least of which are but little practical value, all school-going boys and girls should get at least an elementary course in first aid.

It is a desirable and necessary subject which our education authorities should give serious attention, as the training given remains of practical value all through life.

“What greater aim can man attain than conquest over human pain?”

It is a great and privileged gift to be able to bring useful relief to a poor sufferer in an accident – perhaps to staunch ebbing life blood and to save a life. Yet the knowledge could and should be acquired in our national schools.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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During an ESB power strike in April 1972, petrol pumps had to be operated with a winder, but Declan Forde of Prospect Hill, Gawlay City, found a more novel way of doing it - using a bicycle. The back tyreless wheel of the bicycle was connected to the pump by a belt, with the pedals rotating as petrol was pumped. Declan commented at the time: "This unique method brought us more customers, because by using the bike we pumped the petrol three times faster than the ordinary ESB current." Also in the photograph are Pat Kenehan (right) watching Joe Flaherty operate the pump.

1921

Bad buying policy

It is interesting and useful to speculate how far the conditions that prevailed at Galway great annual fair on Tuesday and Wednesday of this week were due to its postponement on the one hand, and to the circumstances of our time on the other.

No doubt, the enforced adjournment and the uncertainty as to when the fair would be held combined to reduce the attendance.

It is possible that stock which, in the ordinary course, would have been taken to the fair had it been held at the appointed time, were disposed of by other means. Against this we have the fact that the fixture in point of attendance and sales was smaller than a normal monthly fair.

The truth is that cumulative causes contributed to its partial failure. Of these the postponement was only incidental. Only 159 wagon loads of stock left Galway during the two days against 259 at the annual fair last year and 360 the previous year.

Whilst the Midland Great Western Railway Company did all that could have been expected in the circumstances to assist in making the fair a success, the Great Southern did practically nothing at all. Six wagons were placed at the disposal of purchasers by the latter company on the Limerick-Sligo branch.

This is illustrated by the fact that most of those who attended Galway fair arrived on the evening before; few ventured to make the journey on the actual morning of the fair. Again, buyers report that owing to the difficulties of transport, and the recent unnecessary foot and mouth scare, they cannot tranship cattle to anything like the same extent as formerly, and owning to the prolonged drought, there is a shortage of grass for grazing in the rich midland counties where extensive buyers keep their stock from one fair to the other.

Apart from these causes, another much more interesting explanation is given. It is suggested is that the country farmer has not yet realised that there is a considerable drop in prices, and has not adapted himself to the new conditions.

This fall, it is clamed, is likely to be retrogressive under present conditions. The cost of living is falling, and must fall still further in order to restore “the economic balance”. Yet farmers prefer to hold back their stock in expectation, apparently, that something like old prices will be restored, rather than part with them. This, a cattle-buying expert informs us, is bad policy.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

 

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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High fashion at the Athenry Show on September 2, 1972.

1921

Careless farmers

The unfavourable spring and summer of 19230 were not altogether accountable for the partial failure of last season’s potato crop. Planting was deferred until three or four weeks after the usual time, and the spraying of the crop was very carelessly carried out.

Not more than half the usual quantities of spraying materials were sold last year in County Galway. The wagon loads of potatoes which County Galway consumers were obliged to get from other parts of Ireland to go to prove the care and attention taken from growers in other counties.

To meet the increased cost of labour and manures farmers must grow heavier crops, and avoid risks as far as possible. To do so, spraying must be carried out efficiently.

County Galway, with 24,000 Irish acres of potatoes, is the second county in Ireland in respect of area. The total yield in 1920 was about 100,000 tons below that of an average year, which was a serious loss to the farmers and a hardship on the townspeople.

We hope that the lesson of 1920 will not be forgotten, and that farmers will this year spray in time and thoroughly.

One of the farmer’s chief difficulties is keeping of his crops free from weeds. Unfortunately in this important matter some of our farmers are rather careless. They do not realises – probably through lack of education in the matter – that where a crop is allowed to get weedy, the material resources of the land are being doubly taxed, and the crop which it is intended to grow cannot be a viable, much less a financial success.

The farmer has no power over some of the circumstances which determine the success or failure of a crop, and it is, therefore, a short-sighted policy for him not to use every means in his power to check weeds over which he has complete control.

Our attention has been directed to this matter by the number of cornfields in some districts, which are covered with the weed well-known to farmers as “Baráiste”.

We cannot estimate the extent of the damage caused year after year to our corn crops, but it must be very considerable. The yield of gran is greatly reduced, and the quality seriously impaired.

Modern science has given us a simple, effective, remedy involving little labour. This remedy has been used successfully for some years past by the best of our farmers, but we deeply regret the lack of enthusiasm displayed by many of our tillers in connection with the destruction of this objectionable weed.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

 

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