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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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A wonderful view of a busy Salthill in the early 1960s, looking west from the top of Seapoint ballroom.

1915

Galway as naval base

Yesterday (Thursday) morning the police at Galway were notified “to hold themselves in readiness” to warn all non-combatants to move inland in the event of an enemy raid on the coast-line.

Our City Reporter states that he is informed on reliable authority that sixteen converted armoured steam trawlers are being sent to Galway as a base from which to guard the coast-line. Possibly Galway will be constituted one of the Irish naval bases.

It is understood that the Admiralty has decided to establish at Galway, for the present at any rate, a base for coastal patrol boats and mine-sweepers. Synchronising as it does with the warning to the population of coast towns, to be prepared to move inland under the directions of the authorities in the case of an enemy raid, the announcement would seem to possess some significance.

During the past month, various Admiralty craft have occasionally been seen in the Bay. It is likely that the City will be used as a supply base.

Already, Lieutenant Holmes, R.N.R., has arrived in Galway, and it is understood that the preliminary arrangements are in his hands.

The possibilities of an invasion are practically negligible. The only military purpose a raid on the West coast of Ireland could serve would be to “draw off” important fighting units of the British Grand Fleet; but before the raid could take place, some German battle cruisers would first have to get clear of the Fleet and minefields, and sail round the north coast of Scotland.

There remains, of course, the possibility of a raid by Taube or Zeppelin. Such a raid on Ireland would be the biggest of the many big blunders that Germany has yet made and it is most unlikely that a madcap enterprise of the kind will ever be undertaken against this country.

1940

Curse of modern life

“The curse of modern life is a long engagement before marriage. Sometimes the girl is brought to ruin and destruction, and frequently she is jilted for some younger and more attractive person.”

This statement was made by Very Rev. Canon Davis, P.P., St. Joseph’s (Rahoon), Galway, during the course of a sermon delivered at Mass on Sunday.

Speaking on the importance of marriage, Very Rev. Canon Davis said: “In other countries, Italy, France and German, so important is the regard for population that marriage has been subsidised by the State and a remedy must also be found in this country. The wealth of any country is its population, and the empty cradle is the curse of our State at the present time.”

The Home Front

Editorial

The advice of Mr. Patrick Hogan, the late Minister for Agriculture, never applied to this country with such force as it does to-day. Mr. Hogan was never tired of giving the farmers of Ireland, of whose troubles and difficulties he had practical experience, the advice to have “one more cow, one more sow and one more acre under the plough”.

By this means the wealth of the country could be increased in the most immediate and effective way, the standard of life of the farming community raised, and our self-dependence rendered almost impregnable.

What is the economic position of Eire to-day? Have we sufficient feeding stuffs to carry us through the period of a prolonged war? Can we obtain seeds to grow more crops in the season that lies ahead?

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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1922

Scabs warning

An exciting incident in connection with the postal strike occurred at Mary-st., Galway, at four o’clock last Saturday afternoon.

An official of the Galway Electric Lighting Company, Ltd., accompanied by another official, had gone to the central post office at Eglinton-street to collect the letters of the company. Shortly after he had left, it was alleged that he had taken other letters for delivery in Mary-street on his way back to the works.

The strike picket immediately gave chase, and an exciting scene, which was witnessed by a number of people in the street, followed.

The officials of the company were chased into the licensed premises of Mr. J. S. Young, but it could not be found that they had delivered any letters.

“We did not see them delivering any letters,” said one of the strikers. “Anyhow, an undertaking has been signed now not to attempt to deliver any to other people.”

A few national soldiers in uniform were standing at the Eglinton-street end of Mary-street during the incident. Four lady members of the staff at the Galway central office returned to work on Saturday and were understood to be engaged upon sorting of letters recently delivered by road.

It is stated that letters are also being posted at the central boxes. Meanwhile the picket remains almost continuously “on duty” outside the office, in front of which two boards have been place, one stating, “Don’t take letters from scabs”; and another “Restricted Services – Four do the work of forty-two”.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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Children examine the carcass of a 40-foot sperm whale, beached in Loughaunrone near Oranmore in September 1997. The whale was later burned on the beach as Council engineers were concerned about the danger of seepage if the giant mammal was buried.

1922

Connemara raids

The Publicity Department, Railway Hotel, Galway, issues the following: – Mr. Richard O’Toole, Lettermore, Connemara, has been forced to leave his home as a result of a raid made upon it by irregulars and subsequent threats.

A few nights ago, a party of men came to Mr. O’Toole’s home and demanded his motor bicycle. He refused to give it. The leader of the raiders, tapping his gun, said: “Do you see this?”

“Shoot away,” was Mr. O’Toole’s reply, and the raiders are then said to have gone to the garage to look for the machine. He managed, however, to get the machine, and to make his way to Galway. The men threatened that they would return to his house on the succeeding night and take him.

He was obliged to leave some men to mind his mother, who is very nervous, and falls into a faint when a raid takes place.

The house of Mr. Cloherty at Roundstone was also visited and about £40 worth of stuff taken. Mr. Cloherty is the father of Mr. J. J. Cloherty, a well-known County Councillor, and is a strong supporter of the Treaty.

A shop in Kilkerrin was also raided, and a considerable quantity of goods taken.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

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The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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Thatching one of the houses on Shantalla Road, just up from Cooke's Corner, in the 1970s.

1922

The third Dáil

The first meeting of the third Dáil held on Saturday morning last at Leinster House, Kildare-street, the premises of the Royal Dublin Society, recalled for a few minutes some of the stormy scenes at Westminster when Irish affairs were being discussed.

On Saturday, as then, Mr Laurence Ginnell was the central figure. He is apparently always cast for the role of obstructionist in politics, and on Saturday he made full use of his opportunity, with the result that, as at Westminster, he was carried form his seat by three stalwart attendants and expelled from the Assembly.

The Dáil met in the theatre of the house, a semi-circular room with seats rising tier upon tier from an open space in the centre. At the back of the last row of seats there is a promenade, and for some time before the Dáil was due to open, Mr. Ginnell, black band in hand and slouch, hat on head, marched round and round, speaking to no one, but apparently, like an arch conspirator, deep in thought.

Probably he felt lonely, for he was the only one of the anti-treaty members elected to the Dáil who put in an appearance. Miss MacSwiney and the rest, who were known to be in Dublin, have presumably decided to observe a policy of abstention.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

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