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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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Children from Cloondahamper National School in the parish of Killererin in 1958. This is one of many images included in a new book, 'Cloondahamper – A History’ by young local author Luke Silke. Front row, from left: Kathleen Courtney, Breege Rooney, Nora Kelly, Patricia Gannon, Patsy Concannon, Pauline Silke, Kitty Miskell, Teresa Gannon, Kathy Divney, Pauline Smith, Mary Rooney, Mattie Boyle. Second row, from left: Michael Boyle, Mick Hawd, Tom Collins, Mary Collins, Mary Kelly, Teresa Concannon, Nancy Fahy, Chrissie Collins, Mary Nolan, Mary E Duggan, Ann Gannon, Nora Boyle, Teresa Connell. Third row, from left: Bridie Boyle, Mary Fahy, Nell Boyle, Sally Gannon, Carmel Connell, Annie Mitchell, Mary B Hawd, Alice Hawd, Chrissie Nolan, Olive Smith, Josie Gannon, Tom Boyle, Mary Heverin (teacher). Back row, from left: Sean Glynn (teacher), Patrick Miskell, Stephen Hansberry, Paddy Collins, Michael Fahy, Padraic Mitchell, Tom Collins, Oliver Mitchell, Christy Fahy, Tedd McDermott, Pete McDermott, Padraic Kelly. The book, Cloondahamper – A History’, will be launched this Friday night in The Red Gap, Barnaderg.

1914

Funeral under flood

A few days ago, a very sensational incident occurred near Mountbellew, Galway due entirely to the flooding of an area that has hitherto never been inundated. The road, which is a very short distance outside Mountbellew, became subject to floods at the Newbridge side, and in places water reached the height of 5ft.

A funeral was passing there, and when in the centre of the stream, the horse shied, precipitating the occupants of the car, which included a woman, into the water. The woman was rescued with difficulty, and when she was secured again, she was found to be unconscious, and was only restored after some attention.

Some of those crossing on side cars were compelled to take refuge on the dickie, or sit on the well while fording the flood as the water rose up to the shafts of the car. Two or three intrepid motorists who tried to get through had their engines stopped and their cars held up.

The flooding is believed locally to be due to the filling up in recent years of an old swallow hole, as this region has never been inundated to such a serious extent.

From the trenches

A detachment of the Connaught Rangers were manoeuvring near Ypres to catch a body of Germans who were sheltering behind a farm.

Within the house itself were two of the officers and it occurred to private O’Keeffe to get them out. So he dashed up to the door, exposed for 200 yards to furious rifle fire, and demanded the instant surrender of the two astonished Germans as being a sound preliminary.

As they refused, O’Keeffe shot one of them, took the other prisoner and brought him back to the regiment. His prisoner was so much moved by O’Keeffe’s amazing courage that he wrote a note in his captor’s pay book, urging any German who should have the luck to capture O’Keeffe to “give the best treatment to a brave man who saved my life.”

1939

Extensive flooding

The recent rains have caused extensive flooding in the Eyrecourt, Banagher and Meelick areas, the rivers Shannon and Suck floods having risen to an extent not seen for many years.

Floods are threatening households, out-offices and haggards and extensive areas of pastures in a large area around Shannonbridge, Banagher and other neighbouring districts. In Ballinasloe, along the banks of the river Suck, the floods cover extensive tracts of grazing lands, bogs, etc., and the river floods in the area of the town of Ballinasloe cover large areas also.

Lough Corrib levels

Although the thirty-five miles stretch of Lough Corrib from Galway to Maam, with its wide watershed of Loughs Mask and Conn, had, in the late autumn of this year, reached the lowest level ever known, its upper reaches have now, owing to the torrential rains, attained a higher level than any known in the memory of the oldest inhabitant.

In some places about fifteen miles from Galway, the lake is nearly six inches higher than has ever been known and it is believed that the mountain streams surrounding the upper reaches of the Corrib have not yet emptied their flood waters into the lake.

Shop early

Thoughtfulness for others is one of the great Christian virtues. It is, indeed, practical Christianity and its exercise affords one of the greatest of all means of developing nobility of character. Shops throughout the West are brightening for Christmas and displaying their stocks to the best advantage, and our columns today afford ample evidence of the range and variety of seasonable gifts that are being offered.

All this means more work for those cheery and patient shop assistants who do so much to aid the customers throughout the year. We hope, therefore, the customers will give a ready response by doing the Christmas shopping as early as possible, thus enabling the workers to get to their homes on the Saturday preceding Christmas Day, so that they may have a long and happy weekend with their families.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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A little girl celebrates Sarsfields’ success in the County Hurling Final in 1997.

1922

The ‘pay-nobodies’

The righteous wrath of members of Galway County Council very properly manifested itself against the “pay nobodies” at the meeting on Saturday last.

“I am quite satisfied,” declared Dr. Walsh, “that numbers of people who defend the policy of not paying rates are thoroughly dishonest.”

Mr. Kennedy said the policy to-day was to pay nobody and the people who were in debt themselves “wanted everybody else to be in the same position”.

Mr. Tierney invoked the dictum of the Irish Hierarchy in regard to the payment of just and lawful debts. Verily, “there are greater thieves than Cacus” – men who have such noble and patriotic notions that, to their mind, national freedom is synonymous with freedom from just and lawful obligations. It is time the people paid their rates and debts and gave up their outworn cant.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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Oil-covered swans being rescued for cleaning from the water at the Claddagh following an oil spill into the River Corrib in March 2001. A spillage upstream reached the Claddagh Basin and dozens of swans had to be removed to a sanctuary for safe keeping. About 20 swans were so contaminated that they either died or had to be put down.

1922

Temperance club

A long-felt want in Galway has been supplied this week by the opening on Monday night of the temperance club in the Columban Hall.

The club, which will be carried on under the committee of the Pioneer Association, is not confined exclusively to pioneers, but will be open to persons who have a pledge against the use of alcoholic drinks.

There will be an entrance fee of 2s. and a nominal payment for members of 6d. a month will be required to pay expenses. It is intended to provide games, etc., on the premises and in the near future to organise concerts, debates, conversazione, etc.

Rev. Father Stapleton, director of the Pioneer Association, is interesting himself in the club, and those who know the kindly soggarth aroon’s organising capacity have no doubt as to the future success of the club.

Those desirous of joining should call at the hall any night during the week between the hours of 7 and 10.30 p.m.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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Angela O'Keefe, Chairwoman of Music for Galway, pictured with a £16,000 Steinway grand piano just after it was delivered to University College Galway, ahead of its assembly in the Aula Maxima. Music for Galway fundraised to buy the piano which had to be transported from London after its purchase.

1922

Tackling drink

The International Congress on Prohibition sitting in Brussels reports that the liquor problem is substantially the same everywhere. In Ireland at present alcoholism has for us a tragic interest.

At no period in Irish history has there been so great a consumption of alcoholic liquors. Prohibition, even if it were practicable, would not solve the problem. America has taught us that lesson.

Scarcely a week passes that the American hospital registers do not record the death from alcoholic poisoning on a scale unprecedented before the country went “dry”.

The drink problem will never be successfully tackled in Ireland until such time as the public cooperate with the authorities in a rigid enforcement of the licensing laws and the drunkard is regarded as a pariah in a respectable community.

In this connection the announcement made at the last Galway parish court that persons found guilty of illicit distillation will be sent to jail without the option of a fine will be welcomed.

This is a step in the right direction and should act as a deterrent to people at present engaged in a traffic which is slowly poisoning the lives, in the moral as well as the physical sense, of large numbers of our people in outlying portions of the country.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

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