Galway In Days Gone By

His Lordship, Most Rev. Dr. Browne, Bishop of Galway, and Rev. Father Glynn, C.C., St. Patrick's in the funeral procession of Monsignor Considine to the grounds of St. Patrick's for interment.
His Lordship, Most Rev. Dr. Browne, Bishop of Galway, and Rev. Father Glynn, C.C., St. Patrick's in the funeral procession of Monsignor Considine to the grounds of St. Patrick's for interment.

1918

Ejected from court

At Galway Quarter Sessions on Saturday, Patrick Leonard, Dublin, summoned Myles J. Keaven, Oranmore, for £6 9s. paid by him to J.P. Cuffe, salesmaster, Dublin, for the grazing of cattle, defendant’s property. Mr. Golding, C.S., appeared for plaintiff, and Mr. McDonnell, solicitor, appeared for defendant.

J.P. Cuffe stated he received a letter from defendant, stating he had cattle for sale, and asking if he had any grass. Witness wrote to defendant stating he had, and defendant sent 31 cattle, and asked that they be handed to Mr. Leonard.

The defence was that the cattle had deteriorated while in charge of the plaintiff.

His Honor: Is it your case that those animals were starved?

– Yes. They were on land which there was no grass on. If you understand the working of a farm . . .

His Honor: I don’t want to understand the working of a farm. I can understand an answer to a straight question. Is it your case that the cattle got nothing to eat?

Defendant: They were on land which there was no grass on. I mean to say that I would not put the cattle on it for more than a day.

His Honor: Am I to understand they got nothing to eat? Do I understand you that during the time they were on Mr. Cuffe’s land, they got nothing at all.

Mr. McDonnell: We are tried here for money paid by plaintiff in mistake and which he had no authority to pay.

His Honor: The money had been paid by Mr. Leonard to Mr. Cuffe on his behalf.

Defendant interjected and His Honor ordered him to go down. Defendant made a further observation and His Honor directed a policeman to remove him. As the latter was being removed, he remarked that His Honor was the first man that ever put him out of court.

His Honor gave a decree for the full amount.

1943

Blackrock raft danger

Mr. H. Deeney, Hon. Secretary, Connacht Branch of the Irish Amateur Swimming Association writes: I wish to point out that the present position of the raft at Blackrock, Salthill, is a rather dangerous one. It is too far away from the concrete platform, and its position relative to the platform is very ill-judged.

This situation is an inducement to unwise and unpractised swimmers to “chance their arm” at swimming to the raft. Although finding it severe enough to do this, they never consider how they are going to accomplish the return journey against choppy seas, tides or prevailing currents.

During crowded moments, divers complain that a constant stream of swimmers passes underneath the diving boards on their way to the raft. It is conceivable that tragedy could occur in these circumstances, through the collision of a diver with a swimmer. To avoid the danger, I would request those responsible for the raft should move it to a point nearer the platform and out of line with the ends of the upper diving platform.

Overcrowded house

C.I. O’Flynn, County Manager, warned the Galway Corporation on Thursday that should loans be funded there should be no agitation by members of the Corporation to pass on to Small Dwellings Act loanees and others the benefits that would accrue to the Corporation by the funding of the loans.

He told the meeting that he had pointed out to the Local Government Department that between 100 and 120 more houses were required in the city for people from condemned areas and that many more houses were required to relieve overcrowding in habitable houses.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune