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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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His Lordship, Most Rev. Dr. Browne, Bishop of Galway, and Rev. Father Glynn, C.C., St. Patrick's in the funeral procession of Monsignor Considine to the grounds of St. Patrick's for interment.

1918

Ejected from court

At Galway Quarter Sessions on Saturday, Patrick Leonard, Dublin, summoned Myles J. Keaven, Oranmore, for £6 9s. paid by him to J.P. Cuffe, salesmaster, Dublin, for the grazing of cattle, defendant’s property. Mr. Golding, C.S., appeared for plaintiff, and Mr. McDonnell, solicitor, appeared for defendant.

J.P. Cuffe stated he received a letter from defendant, stating he had cattle for sale, and asking if he had any grass. Witness wrote to defendant stating he had, and defendant sent 31 cattle, and asked that they be handed to Mr. Leonard.

The defence was that the cattle had deteriorated while in charge of the plaintiff.

His Honor: Is it your case that those animals were starved?

– Yes. They were on land which there was no grass on. If you understand the working of a farm . . .

His Honor: I don’t want to understand the working of a farm. I can understand an answer to a straight question. Is it your case that the cattle got nothing to eat?

Defendant: They were on land which there was no grass on. I mean to say that I would not put the cattle on it for more than a day.

His Honor: Am I to understand they got nothing to eat? Do I understand you that during the time they were on Mr. Cuffe’s land, they got nothing at all.

Mr. McDonnell: We are tried here for money paid by plaintiff in mistake and which he had no authority to pay.

His Honor: The money had been paid by Mr. Leonard to Mr. Cuffe on his behalf.

Defendant interjected and His Honor ordered him to go down. Defendant made a further observation and His Honor directed a policeman to remove him. As the latter was being removed, he remarked that His Honor was the first man that ever put him out of court.

His Honor gave a decree for the full amount.

1943

Blackrock raft danger

Mr. H. Deeney, Hon. Secretary, Connacht Branch of the Irish Amateur Swimming Association writes: I wish to point out that the present position of the raft at Blackrock, Salthill, is a rather dangerous one. It is too far away from the concrete platform, and its position relative to the platform is very ill-judged.

This situation is an inducement to unwise and unpractised swimmers to “chance their arm” at swimming to the raft. Although finding it severe enough to do this, they never consider how they are going to accomplish the return journey against choppy seas, tides or prevailing currents.

During crowded moments, divers complain that a constant stream of swimmers passes underneath the diving boards on their way to the raft. It is conceivable that tragedy could occur in these circumstances, through the collision of a diver with a swimmer. To avoid the danger, I would request those responsible for the raft should move it to a point nearer the platform and out of line with the ends of the upper diving platform.

Overcrowded house

C.I. O’Flynn, County Manager, warned the Galway Corporation on Thursday that should loans be funded there should be no agitation by members of the Corporation to pass on to Small Dwellings Act loanees and others the benefits that would accrue to the Corporation by the funding of the loans.

He told the meeting that he had pointed out to the Local Government Department that between 100 and 120 more houses were required in the city for people from condemned areas and that many more houses were required to relieve overcrowding in habitable houses.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune

Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

Published

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The construction of a new wheelchair-friendly footbridge by Galway Corporation over the Friar’s River Canal at Newtownsmith on October 20, 1998. It replaced the old temporary bridge that had become dangerous and could not take wheelchairs.

1922

Posting poor returns

Postal rates and telephone charges in Ireland are at the moment probably as high as they are in any country in the world, higher than they are in most.

The penny post has been restored in Great Britain, following the wage cut, which was introduced without any stoppage in the public service.

And the postal facilities in Ireland at the moment are probably worse than in any civilised state in the world. This is not altogether the fault of those who control the post office.

But, while much of this is due to conditions over which postal officials can have no control, a very considerable percentage of it is due to a badly run post office.

There is something very rotten in a service that loses a million a year, and yet gives the public only very indifferent results; for not merely are the Irish people paying abnormal postal and telegraph rates, but they are paying for the deficit in the form of taxation, so that their letters cost them much more than twopence.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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A little girl celebrates Sarsfields’ success in the County Hurling Final in 1997.

1922

The ‘pay-nobodies’

The righteous wrath of members of Galway County Council very properly manifested itself against the “pay nobodies” at the meeting on Saturday last.

“I am quite satisfied,” declared Dr. Walsh, “that numbers of people who defend the policy of not paying rates are thoroughly dishonest.”

Mr. Kennedy said the policy to-day was to pay nobody and the people who were in debt themselves “wanted everybody else to be in the same position”.

Mr. Tierney invoked the dictum of the Irish Hierarchy in regard to the payment of just and lawful debts. Verily, “there are greater thieves than Cacus” – men who have such noble and patriotic notions that, to their mind, national freedom is synonymous with freedom from just and lawful obligations. It is time the people paid their rates and debts and gave up their outworn cant.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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on

Oil-covered swans being rescued for cleaning from the water at the Claddagh following an oil spill into the River Corrib in March 2001. A spillage upstream reached the Claddagh Basin and dozens of swans had to be removed to a sanctuary for safe keeping. About 20 swans were so contaminated that they either died or had to be put down.

1922

Temperance club

A long-felt want in Galway has been supplied this week by the opening on Monday night of the temperance club in the Columban Hall.

The club, which will be carried on under the committee of the Pioneer Association, is not confined exclusively to pioneers, but will be open to persons who have a pledge against the use of alcoholic drinks.

There will be an entrance fee of 2s. and a nominal payment for members of 6d. a month will be required to pay expenses. It is intended to provide games, etc., on the premises and in the near future to organise concerts, debates, conversazione, etc.

Rev. Father Stapleton, director of the Pioneer Association, is interesting himself in the club, and those who know the kindly soggarth aroon’s organising capacity have no doubt as to the future success of the club.

Those desirous of joining should call at the hall any night during the week between the hours of 7 and 10.30 p.m.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

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