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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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Eyre Square a picture of tranquility in 1963, when the park there was surrounded by railings.

1914

Bulldog claim fails

At the Quarter Sessions before His Honor Judge Doyle, K.C., James McPhilbin, Bowling Green, Galway through his father Michael McPhilbin, sued Mr. Martin Newell, Market-street, for £50 damages for injuries alleged to have been received through defendant’s bulldog biting him.

James McPhilbin deposed that on the 11th August last he, with other boys, was playing at the Shambles barracks, when the ball went over the wall and into the defendant’s yard. Witness went in for the ball, and when he was coming over the wall, and in the act of standing on a window sill, the bulldog jumped up and caught him by the heel of the boot first.

Witness was then knocked, and the dog caught him in the calf of the leg. The dog did not let him go for about ten minutes, at the end of which time a boy in the employment of the defendant released him. Witness was nearly a month in the infirmary.

Mr Newell said that on several occasions he caught the plaintiff and his brother-in-law in the yard, and on one occasion he caught plaintiff in his hen-house.

On another occasion a stone came through the sky-light, and he found plaintiff and other boys concealed. About 20 panes of glass had been broken in his windows. He kept fowl and the dog in the barrack yard and barred up the back door of it, so as to prevent trespass.

His Honor said, in his opinion, the action had failed. Mr. Newell was entitled to keep fowl in the yard, and also the dog, which his Honor believed was a quiet one, otherwise Mr. Newell would have taken steps to keep it confined. He was satisfied that the boy was a trespasser on the occasion, and he dismissed the action.

1939

Havoc and terror

Residents of Clifden, Connemara, were startled from their slumbers at 7.30 on Monday morning when a thunderstorm of an intensity never before experienced broke over the town. Blinding flashes of lightning were almost simultaneous with deafening peals of thunder. Children screamed hysterically, and a number of women fainted. The storm lasted for over twenty minutes.

A flash of lightning struck the spire of the Clifden Protestant Church, ripped part of the masonry, burned up eaves and water drains, and completely destroyed the lightning conductor.

Immediately afterwards, another flash struck the house of Thomas MacWilliams, about fifty yards from the church, smashing all the indows and wrecking the bathroom. Mr. MacWilliams, who was eating his breakfast at the time, was flung across the diningroom by the explosion.

Apart from shock, he was unhurt. Other members of the family were in a house nearby and a woman was cooking her husband’s breakfast when a flash came down the chimney, and she was knocked unconscious.

The Railway Hotel, Clifden, was also struck, but only slight damage was done. The fuse-box in the Clifden Post Office was blown from its sockets and telephone communications in West Connemara was dislocated.

The electric lighting system in the town was put out of action and all wireless sets connected with it were damaged.

Port of Galway

The citizens of Galway will learn with quiet satisfaction and gratitude the report of the acting resident engineer which was made to the meeting of the Harbour Board on Tuesday last. Mr. McCullough stated that the entire work would be completed about the midsummer of next year.

Already the entrance channel has been in a great measure finished and the rock outside the entrance to the dock has been cleared. Soon the dock gates, all the material for which has already been delivered, will be erected and the dock itself will be completed.

Thus we see the approaching completion of an effort for which Galway has striven for almost two generations – an effort designed to compete out outlet to the sea and this to give to the port of Galway the place which the geographical position of the Capital of Connacht deserves.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

 

Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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Attendees at the Blessing of Galway Bay on August 15, 1982.

1922

A leader lost

“I have the greatest hope in the Irish people. But what we have got to learn in our public life is the merit of following the unpopular path. We have plenty of physical courage. Moral courage is what we need – and above all, we must develop.”

These words were spoken by President Griffith a few weeks before his death. They were words of inspiration, hope, instruction. They revealed the optimism that carried the man through the gloom of dark years, the discouragements of dangerous days and nights, until at last his bold spirit cleft the clouds, and showed the Irish people light.

They displace as in a flash that optimism that bore him through to triumph, that spirit that inspired all his acts, that courage that held him in the fairway when others wandered into by-paths, and the constructive genius that, had he lived, would have seen an Ireland even in his own day that could stand four-square every wind that blew.

O’Connell has been described as the Irish Liberator, the great tribune of his people. Griffith laid well and truly the foundations of a movement which won a greater triumph than O’Connell.

Local enterprise

Through the commendable enterprise of Mrs. Payne, Cross-street, the people of Athenry are at last provided with an amusement hall in which they can pass away many a pleasant evening.

The hall, the building of which has been recently completed, is a commodious one and can accommodate quite a considerable number. Already a well-known theatrical company has had an engagement at the new hall when there was a magnificent attendance each night – the entertainment being the right thing in the right place.

In a few weeks’ time this company will return with a greatly enlarged array of artistes, when the townspeople will be treated to something they will not forget.

Practice dances will be held on Sunday evenings, and there is a suggestion to secure the services of a qualified teacher of Irish dances to bring up the rising generation with a knowledge of Irish step-dancing.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

 

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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Rev Fr Raymond Watters O.P recites a decade of the rosary as the rain begins to pour down during the Blessing of Galway Bay on August 15, 1882.

1922

Dawn surrender

National troops operating from Galway and Athenry at dawn on Wednesday morning surrounded an area about four miles between Liscananaun village and Aucloggeen, on the eastern side of the Corrib, and after a smart movement captured nineteen irregulars, with their officers, twenty-two service and Mauser rifles, a number of service revolvers and automatics, and considerable quantities of ammunition for bombs.

The National troops were under command of Co-Commandant Austin Brennan, O.C., Galway area, and the various battalion and company officers, and the plan to surround these villages, which lie in a marshy waste between the Curragh Line, or Galway-Headford road, and the main road from Galway to Tuam, was evolved after information had been received that a number of irregulars were quartered there, and were commandeering sheep and foodstuffs from people in surrounding districts.

Slowly and silently, accompanied by a Lancia armoured car on which machine guns were mounted, the National troops moved out from Galway shortly before two a.m. on Wednesday. One column took the Galway to Headford road, the other taking the Tuam road.

The column operating on the Headford road swung to the right beyond the Cregg river, taking the road to Drumgriffin. By dawn they had taken up extended formation in the woods around Cregg Castle, and this formed a trap into which the irregulars were subsequently driven.

Trade unions position

Mr. Cathal O’Shannon, T.D., in his presidential address at the Trade Union Congress on Monday, declare that organised Labour was separate from and independent of any political party, and would take no dictation from any quarter outside its own ranks.

He strongly protested against militarism, from whatever quarter it came, and condemned the political censorship of thought and opinion, the ignoring of laws relating to the custody of prisoners, the existence of a semi-military police force, and the propaganda on both sides.

The present conflict or strife, he declared, was unnecessary and counselled the Irish workers to keep aloof from it.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

 

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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A winner at Ballybrit in July 1964 is led back by its owner and connections.

1922

Civil War impact

Had Ireland enjoyed the blessings of peace this year, the summer and autumn of 1922 would have stood out in our annals as a period when we had entered upon the first stages of real prosperity and welcomed the Irish from overseas to the shores of a free land.

Thousands of Americans came in the earlier part of the season. They had wallets full of money, which they were willing and anxious to spend amongst the people of their own land. To their dismay and keen disappointment, they found Ireland in a state of war.

A holiday in the ordinary sense was out of the question. Many of them turned to the highlands of Scotland; others went to Oberammergau, and other parts of the Continent; some turned westward again.

The daily Press has been full of the impressions of these visitors. Some of them had gone through experiences which tinged these impressions with rankling bitterness. We can imagine what they will say when they return home!

Ireland has lost by this fratricidal strife morally as well as materially, and the tragedy is that the loss has yet to be fully accounted, and that it comes upon a nation that has just secured its freedom after a struggle of centuries and at a time when we need all the wealth and work we can secure for national reconstruction.

It is now a matter of doubt whether Galway race meeting can be held this year, as those interested are not keen on courting a failure that would lower the prestige that Ballybrit has won.

Wait goes on for light

The proposed scheme for electric lighting of the town of Athenry has been temporarily postponed owing to the present condition of the country. The proposed capital was to be £3,000, £2,100 of which was to be subscribed by seven directors, while the rest was to be got from shareholders. It is expected that the project will be re-mooted as soon as opportunity offers.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

 

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