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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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A snapshot of a very different Galway from the early 1960s, long before the city centre streets were pedestrianised. Not only was traffic allowed on the street then, but it went both ways – and parking was allowed, too.

1915

Sociable ducks

At the City Petty Sessions, Delia MacEvaddy, Salthill, summoned Mary Kelly, of the same place, for the larceny of a duck. Miss McEvaddy swore that she lived near Baymount for six years, Mrs. Kelly lived there for three years.

She was in the habit of keeping fowl until Mrs. Kelly came, and then she began to miss them. There was a stable adjoining the premises of both, belonging to defendant, and she (witness) saw some of her ducks in it.

Complainant then went on to refer to a number of other occasions on which she missed some of her ducks. On one occasion she missed five ducks, and she went to the defendant’s house, and the husband let them out.

On last Thursday evening, she missed a duck, and she suspected it would be in Kelly’s shed. She went there and turned a box upside down and found the duck.

Mr. Kenny (solicitor, defending) said his case was that Miss MacEvaddy put the duck under the box, otherwise it was a very strange thing that she knew exactly where it was.

The Chairman said the case was proven that the duck was under Mrs. Kelly’s box, but he did not believe she put it there for the purpose of larceny. It was more to get a dig at her neighbour.

The ducks, he said, amidst laughter, were sociable ducks, as they went over to see Mrs. Kelly’s, and it would be a good thing if both parties had such good feelings as the ducks.

The defendant was cautioned not to try such a joke in the future, as it was a dangerous one.

1940

Public morals suffering

The younger generation would come to the conclusion that amusement was the primary objective in life and that work was only a secondary consideration, said the Very Rev. P. Glynn, Adm., St. Patrick’s, Galway, at Galway Circuit Court on Thursday, before Judge Wyse Power, when opposing the granting of a licence in respect of the Eyre Ballroom, William-street, Galway.

The case came before the Court by way of appeal from the refusal of the District Court to grant a licence for the hall, formerly the site of the old Empire Theatre.

The objection that there were already adequate facilities for dancing in Galway was successfully urged and the Judge dismissed the appeal and refused the licence.

Opposition has been raised in the District Court by the clergy on the grounds that that there were more than enough facilities for dancing in Galway and on the grounds that public morals suffered through dancing.

Rev. Glynn said the number of licences that had already been granted was a bad example to the younger generation. After being up at night dancing, they were not able to do their work the next day.

The Judge said the only evidence on behalf of the applicant was that of the applicant who was admittedly interested in this as a business proposition. There was no evidence that there was demand for another dance hall. Keeping within the evidence, the licence should be refused.

Upset by London raids

A Ballinasloe woman, who gave the excuse that the “bombing of London” had upset her nerves, was also summoned for drunkenness, disorderly conduct and using obscene and abusive language. She told District Justice Cahill that all her family was in London, with the exception of one son in the army.

The prosecuting guard said there were complaints by her neighbours that she was a source of annoyance to them.

Mr. Colohan, solicitor, said her character, generally, was good, unless, perhaps, when she had a few drinks. She had now taken the pledge and promised not to be seen in the court again.

The Justice imposed a fine of 2s 6d on the drunkenness charge and adjourned the other summonses to the next court to test the promise of the defendant.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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The construction of a new wheelchair-friendly footbridge by Galway Corporation over the Friar’s River Canal at Newtownsmith on October 20, 1998. It replaced the old temporary bridge that had become dangerous and could not take wheelchairs.

1922

Posting poor returns

Postal rates and telephone charges in Ireland are at the moment probably as high as they are in any country in the world, higher than they are in most.

The penny post has been restored in Great Britain, following the wage cut, which was introduced without any stoppage in the public service.

And the postal facilities in Ireland at the moment are probably worse than in any civilised state in the world. This is not altogether the fault of those who control the post office.

But, while much of this is due to conditions over which postal officials can have no control, a very considerable percentage of it is due to a badly run post office.

There is something very rotten in a service that loses a million a year, and yet gives the public only very indifferent results; for not merely are the Irish people paying abnormal postal and telegraph rates, but they are paying for the deficit in the form of taxation, so that their letters cost them much more than twopence.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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A little girl celebrates Sarsfields’ success in the County Hurling Final in 1997.

1922

The ‘pay-nobodies’

The righteous wrath of members of Galway County Council very properly manifested itself against the “pay nobodies” at the meeting on Saturday last.

“I am quite satisfied,” declared Dr. Walsh, “that numbers of people who defend the policy of not paying rates are thoroughly dishonest.”

Mr. Kennedy said the policy to-day was to pay nobody and the people who were in debt themselves “wanted everybody else to be in the same position”.

Mr. Tierney invoked the dictum of the Irish Hierarchy in regard to the payment of just and lawful debts. Verily, “there are greater thieves than Cacus” – men who have such noble and patriotic notions that, to their mind, national freedom is synonymous with freedom from just and lawful obligations. It is time the people paid their rates and debts and gave up their outworn cant.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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Oil-covered swans being rescued for cleaning from the water at the Claddagh following an oil spill into the River Corrib in March 2001. A spillage upstream reached the Claddagh Basin and dozens of swans had to be removed to a sanctuary for safe keeping. About 20 swans were so contaminated that they either died or had to be put down.

1922

Temperance club

A long-felt want in Galway has been supplied this week by the opening on Monday night of the temperance club in the Columban Hall.

The club, which will be carried on under the committee of the Pioneer Association, is not confined exclusively to pioneers, but will be open to persons who have a pledge against the use of alcoholic drinks.

There will be an entrance fee of 2s. and a nominal payment for members of 6d. a month will be required to pay expenses. It is intended to provide games, etc., on the premises and in the near future to organise concerts, debates, conversazione, etc.

Rev. Father Stapleton, director of the Pioneer Association, is interesting himself in the club, and those who know the kindly soggarth aroon’s organising capacity have no doubt as to the future success of the club.

Those desirous of joining should call at the hall any night during the week between the hours of 7 and 10.30 p.m.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

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