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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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A juggler performing at the junction of Quay Street-Cross Street in Galway in the 1990s.

1918

Drowning tragedy

A sad drowning accident occurred in the Corrib, near Carrick Lodge, Clonbur, on Sunday. It would appear that three military officers, viz., Captain Lawson, Lieutenant Steward and another young Lieutenant, belonging to the King’s Own Scottish Borderers, left on a reconnoitering expedition per motor from their camp at Claremorris.

At Carrick Lodge, they met Captain Lamb, who is now resident there. Captain Lamb kindly lent the three officers a boat, as they seemed anxious to have a bathe from an adjacent island. They rowed to the island, which is about 60 yards from the shore, and proceeded to bathe.

Captain Lawson soon missed Lieutenant Stewart, and called to a gentleman on a fishing boat nearby. The boat came at once to the place, and the occupants saw the body at the bottom in about nine feet of water.  Everything possible was done to restore animation, but without avail.

Corpus Christi procession

The Diocesan procession, inaugurated by His Lordship the Most Rev, Dr. O’Dea, took place on Sunday at St. Mary’s College, Galway. Between eight and ten thousand people were in attendance at the imposing ceremony. The College and grounds were gaily decorated for the great occasion.

Religious banners were suspended from the windows of the College, and two triumphed arches were erected in the grounds. A large banner hearing the scroll ‘God Bless our Pope’ hung from the recreation hall of the College.

From four o’clock the grounds began to fill rapidly with people from all parts of the city and the surrounding districts, some having travelled from distant places such as Gort, Athenry and Tuam.

1943

Save the Irish language

Galway as capital of the most Gaelic-speaking part of the country held a unique position in the effort for the restoration of the Irish language, said Mr. de Valera, addressing a meeting at Eyre Square on Tuesday evening.

Every person in Galway should make it their business to try and get the Irish language spoken universally as the ordinary language in the shops and streets. Some people might think that was idealism, but it was nothing of the kind. Davis was an idealist; but he was a practically man, too, and he pointed out that a nation’s language was a surer safeguard in a country than fortresses or rivers. As long as they people came together in their own language, they formed a community that could not be destroyed.

Assault charge

At Spiddal District Court on Monday, John Hoban, Minna, was sentenced to two months’ imprisonment not to be enforced if he pays £5 damages to Martin Conneely, Inverin, whom he was charged with assaulting on May 23rd.

Dr. C. O’Leary, M.O., Spiddal, said that Conneely appeared to have received a bad beating. He had four cuts on the top of his head and had lost a lot of blood. The doctor stitched two of the wounds.

Conneely said that Hoban attacked him with a stick when the former questioned him regarding missing carrageen which Conneely had spread on Wallaces’ land.

Mr. W.B. Gavin, Galway, submitted that Conneely had encroached on Hoban’s currageen right.

Record lobster prices

Lobster fishermen along the Connemara coast have been deprived of a considerable amount of their profits in this year’s season owing to unfavourable conditions prevailing. The small quantities of lobsters caught so far have been sold at record prices – up to 28s. per dozen. In normal years the season would be in full swing by the middle of May.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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Pupils of St Mary's College, Ballygar, waiting for tea at the opening of the school's new extension on December 10, 1982.

1922

State is recognised

At 3.30 on the morning of December 6, 1921, a Treaty between Great Britain and Ireland was signed in a room in London. In pursuance of that Treaty, the Government of the Irish Free State was handed over to Mr. Michael Collins on January 16 of the present year.

This week the Free State became a fait accompli, recognised by all the nations of the earth, ratified by its own Parliament and that of Great Britain. This is the great central historical fact which nothing can alter.

In other times under other conditions, this would be a week of general jubilation in Ireland. There can be no doubt about the feelings in the hearts of the majority of people. They feel with the late Mr. Arthur Griffith that “the substance of freedom” has been won, with President Cosgrove that the Irish Government “takes over the control and destiny of our people to hold and administer that charge, answerable only to our own people and to none other; to conduct their affairs as they shall declare, right without interference, not to domination, by any other authority whatsoever on this earth.”

For the Free State has the power, by right of international treaty, to maintain military, naval and air forces, to impose tariffs, to control its own finances absolutely, to make its own laws.

And there is firm hope that before long the green, white and orange of the tricolour will wave triumphantly over not twenty-six counties merely, but over all Ireland.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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The construction of a new wheelchair-friendly footbridge by Galway Corporation over the Friar’s River Canal at Newtownsmith on October 20, 1998. It replaced the old temporary bridge that had become dangerous and could not take wheelchairs.

1922

Posting poor returns

Postal rates and telephone charges in Ireland are at the moment probably as high as they are in any country in the world, higher than they are in most.

The penny post has been restored in Great Britain, following the wage cut, which was introduced without any stoppage in the public service.

And the postal facilities in Ireland at the moment are probably worse than in any civilised state in the world. This is not altogether the fault of those who control the post office.

But, while much of this is due to conditions over which postal officials can have no control, a very considerable percentage of it is due to a badly run post office.

There is something very rotten in a service that loses a million a year, and yet gives the public only very indifferent results; for not merely are the Irish people paying abnormal postal and telegraph rates, but they are paying for the deficit in the form of taxation, so that their letters cost them much more than twopence.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

 

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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A little girl celebrates Sarsfields’ success in the County Hurling Final in 1997.

1922

The ‘pay-nobodies’

The righteous wrath of members of Galway County Council very properly manifested itself against the “pay nobodies” at the meeting on Saturday last.

“I am quite satisfied,” declared Dr. Walsh, “that numbers of people who defend the policy of not paying rates are thoroughly dishonest.”

Mr. Kennedy said the policy to-day was to pay nobody and the people who were in debt themselves “wanted everybody else to be in the same position”.

Mr. Tierney invoked the dictum of the Irish Hierarchy in regard to the payment of just and lawful debts. Verily, “there are greater thieves than Cacus” – men who have such noble and patriotic notions that, to their mind, national freedom is synonymous with freedom from just and lawful obligations. It is time the people paid their rates and debts and gave up their outworn cant.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

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