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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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Boy pupils of Mrs. B. Smyth's School of Music, Abbeygate Street, Galway.

1918

Air visitant

On Friday a carrier pigeon of a beautiful hue visited the gate lodge of Portumna Workhouse, and partook of crumbs of bread from Michael, the intrepid gatekeeper. A casual, who was present, observed something peculiar on both legs and immediately seized the bird.

Upon examination, it was found he was a pigeon of a strange species. On one leg was an aluminium ring, lettered and numbered, and on the other leg was a ring, also lettered and numbered.

Next morning in the small hours, Michael, at the gate of the Union, was aroused from his slumber by a loud knocking, and was at once confronted by Constable Hayden, R.I.C., who demanded and took possession of the pigeon.

At the time of writing, the visitant is a prisoner of the R.I.C. barracks. Nothing definite has leaked out as to where he was bound; although garlands of strange and romantic stories are already woven round his appearance in the district.

Six months dead

On Sunday evening, the dead body of an unknown man was discovered at a place called Caherlea, near Clonboo. The matter was reported to the police and Sergeant Hanglow, and some constables, proceeded to the place and had the body taken out.

It was in an advanced state of decomposition and appeared to be that of a man of the tramp class. The body was fully dressed and there was nothing in the pockets of the clothes.

When found, it was lying face downwards in the drain, which is about 6-foot wide, and 5 foot deep. An inquest was subsequently held on the remains. Dr. Golding deposed that the man was about six months dead. Death, in his opinion, was due to drowning. A verdict was returned accordingly.

1943

Murder trial opens

The trial opened in the Central Criminal Court, Dublin, on Tuesday, before Mr. Justice Overend and a jury, of Martin Griffin (48) of Bushypark, Galway, who is accused of the murder of his wife Bridget, aged 53, at their home on or about February 28th. Griffin pleaded not guilty.

Virtually all the Gardaí and detectives from Galway City gave their evidence in Irish. This necessitated the employment of an interpreter, with the result that the proceedings were slowed down considerably.

Since his mother-in-law signed over the place to his brother-in-law in 1925, there was ill-feeling between the accused and his wife.

In a statement, he said: “I got the hatchet in the stable. I came back then to the bedroom. My wife was then in bed between asleep and awake. She was inside, up against the wall. I hit her with the hatchet – with the back of it – on the left hand side of her head.

“She said something; I do not know what it was. Then I gave her a blow on the head. She rolled out of the bed. She never spoke to me or said anything. I saw her on the floor bleeding. I did not realise that I had done her in until I saw her bleeding on the floor.

“I put on my pants then and my shoes. I changed my shirt and my undershirt then. I saw there were spatters of blood on the pair I took off. When I changed my clothes I brought out the hatched to the harden and hid it in the manure heap in the laneway.”

Commenting on the accused man’s statement, Counsel said the statement was a clear confession of murder.

The law said that drink was not a defence unless it could be established that the accused at the time of the alleged murder was so drunk that he was incapable of forming the intention to commit the crim.

The accused man in this case might have been suffering from the effects of drink, but that did not justify the murder of his wife.

The hearing was adjourned.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

Published

on

The construction of a new wheelchair-friendly footbridge by Galway Corporation over the Friar’s River Canal at Newtownsmith on October 20, 1998. It replaced the old temporary bridge that had become dangerous and could not take wheelchairs.

1922

Posting poor returns

Postal rates and telephone charges in Ireland are at the moment probably as high as they are in any country in the world, higher than they are in most.

The penny post has been restored in Great Britain, following the wage cut, which was introduced without any stoppage in the public service.

And the postal facilities in Ireland at the moment are probably worse than in any civilised state in the world. This is not altogether the fault of those who control the post office.

But, while much of this is due to conditions over which postal officials can have no control, a very considerable percentage of it is due to a badly run post office.

There is something very rotten in a service that loses a million a year, and yet gives the public only very indifferent results; for not merely are the Irish people paying abnormal postal and telegraph rates, but they are paying for the deficit in the form of taxation, so that their letters cost them much more than twopence.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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A little girl celebrates Sarsfields’ success in the County Hurling Final in 1997.

1922

The ‘pay-nobodies’

The righteous wrath of members of Galway County Council very properly manifested itself against the “pay nobodies” at the meeting on Saturday last.

“I am quite satisfied,” declared Dr. Walsh, “that numbers of people who defend the policy of not paying rates are thoroughly dishonest.”

Mr. Kennedy said the policy to-day was to pay nobody and the people who were in debt themselves “wanted everybody else to be in the same position”.

Mr. Tierney invoked the dictum of the Irish Hierarchy in regard to the payment of just and lawful debts. Verily, “there are greater thieves than Cacus” – men who have such noble and patriotic notions that, to their mind, national freedom is synonymous with freedom from just and lawful obligations. It is time the people paid their rates and debts and gave up their outworn cant.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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Oil-covered swans being rescued for cleaning from the water at the Claddagh following an oil spill into the River Corrib in March 2001. A spillage upstream reached the Claddagh Basin and dozens of swans had to be removed to a sanctuary for safe keeping. About 20 swans were so contaminated that they either died or had to be put down.

1922

Temperance club

A long-felt want in Galway has been supplied this week by the opening on Monday night of the temperance club in the Columban Hall.

The club, which will be carried on under the committee of the Pioneer Association, is not confined exclusively to pioneers, but will be open to persons who have a pledge against the use of alcoholic drinks.

There will be an entrance fee of 2s. and a nominal payment for members of 6d. a month will be required to pay expenses. It is intended to provide games, etc., on the premises and in the near future to organise concerts, debates, conversazione, etc.

Rev. Father Stapleton, director of the Pioneer Association, is interesting himself in the club, and those who know the kindly soggarth aroon’s organising capacity have no doubt as to the future success of the club.

Those desirous of joining should call at the hall any night during the week between the hours of 7 and 10.30 p.m.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

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