Classifieds Advertise Archive Subscriptions Family Announcements Photos Digital Editions/Apps
Connect with us

Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

Published

on

Members of the organising committee at the Castlegar parish social. Standing: John Carr, Kevin Shaughnessy, Stephen Francis, Patrick Shaughnessy, Mark Heneghan. Seated: Matthew Hackett, Fr. Bernard Duffy and John Molloy.

1918

Exciting Claddagh scene

The Claddagh on Friday week, was the scene of an exciting encounter between Dominick-street Police and a resident named Thomas Tynan, who is about 35 years of age. On that morning, he was noticed outside his house wearing pants only and brandishing a German sword which his brother brought back from France, in a defiant manner.

He appeared very excited and his demeanour created considerable alarm among the inhabitants. Sergt. McGlynn and Constable Donegan visited the scene and proceeded to arrest Tynan.

He immediately attempted to rush for the sword. The police dashed upon him and a terrific encounter ensued between them. A large dog, the property of Tynan, joined in the ray and violently attacked the police.

Sergt. McGlynn succeeded in temporarily stunning the animal with a blow from his stick which got broken. Other police came to the sergeant and constable’s aid and eventually overpowered Tynan and conveyed him to Dominick-street Barracks.

He was charged before Messrs. Conor Berne and J.M. Campbell, J.P.s on that day and committed as a dangerous lunatic to Ballinasloe Asylum.

1943

Galway-Clifden railway

Mr. Gerald Bartley, T.D., has denied that the Government was responsible for the closing down of the Galway-Clifden railway, and said that the road service served districts in Connemara miles from the old railway line much better than it had done.

More land division

Three Connacht Deputies in the Dáil declared that land re-settlement, so far as the West is concerned, is as pressing as ever. They urged that the officers of the Land Commission who had been loaned to the Department of Agriculture, should be taken back in order to deal with it.

The Western Deputies were Messrs. Beegan, Bartley and Killilea. The last-named Deputy, whose speech was criticised by Mr. James Dillon, urged that the Land Commission should step in and fix a price for any holdings of from 60 acres upwards in the congested areas which were offered for sale.

City art gallery

The establishment of a permanent Municipal Art Gallery in Galway may not be feasible for some years, but a first step in that direction was taken at a public meeting in the Borough Council Offices on Monday when a provisional committee was appointed to make preliminary arrangements.

Advert

Are you frightened of your shadow? Have you ever caught sight of your reflection in a shop window and seen your thickening shadow? Why not take steps now to get rid of excess fat by drinking a daily glass of hot water with a little ‘Limestone’ Phosphate in it and make sure your shadow never grows bigger.

Dramatic turn

Liam Mellowes 2-2 Army 0-7. A whirlwind finish that won a goal five seconds before the final whistle was sounded, gave Liam Mellowes a point victory over the Army in the first round of the Galway Senior Hurling Championship at Galway Sports Ground on Sunday. It was a dramatic ending to a game of grand hurling in which the Army fifteen led practically all the way.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

Published

on

The construction of a new wheelchair-friendly footbridge by Galway Corporation over the Friar’s River Canal at Newtownsmith on October 20, 1998. It replaced the old temporary bridge that had become dangerous and could not take wheelchairs.

1922

Posting poor returns

Postal rates and telephone charges in Ireland are at the moment probably as high as they are in any country in the world, higher than they are in most.

The penny post has been restored in Great Britain, following the wage cut, which was introduced without any stoppage in the public service.

And the postal facilities in Ireland at the moment are probably worse than in any civilised state in the world. This is not altogether the fault of those who control the post office.

But, while much of this is due to conditions over which postal officials can have no control, a very considerable percentage of it is due to a badly run post office.

There is something very rotten in a service that loses a million a year, and yet gives the public only very indifferent results; for not merely are the Irish people paying abnormal postal and telegraph rates, but they are paying for the deficit in the form of taxation, so that their letters cost them much more than twopence.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

 

Continue Reading

Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

Published

on

A little girl celebrates Sarsfields’ success in the County Hurling Final in 1997.

1922

The ‘pay-nobodies’

The righteous wrath of members of Galway County Council very properly manifested itself against the “pay nobodies” at the meeting on Saturday last.

“I am quite satisfied,” declared Dr. Walsh, “that numbers of people who defend the policy of not paying rates are thoroughly dishonest.”

Mr. Kennedy said the policy to-day was to pay nobody and the people who were in debt themselves “wanted everybody else to be in the same position”.

Mr. Tierney invoked the dictum of the Irish Hierarchy in regard to the payment of just and lawful debts. Verily, “there are greater thieves than Cacus” – men who have such noble and patriotic notions that, to their mind, national freedom is synonymous with freedom from just and lawful obligations. It is time the people paid their rates and debts and gave up their outworn cant.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Continue Reading

Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

Published

on

Oil-covered swans being rescued for cleaning from the water at the Claddagh following an oil spill into the River Corrib in March 2001. A spillage upstream reached the Claddagh Basin and dozens of swans had to be removed to a sanctuary for safe keeping. About 20 swans were so contaminated that they either died or had to be put down.

1922

Temperance club

A long-felt want in Galway has been supplied this week by the opening on Monday night of the temperance club in the Columban Hall.

The club, which will be carried on under the committee of the Pioneer Association, is not confined exclusively to pioneers, but will be open to persons who have a pledge against the use of alcoholic drinks.

There will be an entrance fee of 2s. and a nominal payment for members of 6d. a month will be required to pay expenses. It is intended to provide games, etc., on the premises and in the near future to organise concerts, debates, conversazione, etc.

Rev. Father Stapleton, director of the Pioneer Association, is interesting himself in the club, and those who know the kindly soggarth aroon’s organising capacity have no doubt as to the future success of the club.

Those desirous of joining should call at the hall any night during the week between the hours of 7 and 10.30 p.m.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

Continue Reading

Local Ads

Local Ads

Advertisement
Advertisement

Facebook

Advertisement

Trending