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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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Fortune reader Gypsy Lee at Ballinsloe Fair in 1996.

1915

Street hurlers

At the City Petty Sessions, before Mr. Joseph Kilbride, R.M., and Sir James O’Donohoe, three young men named Griffin, King and O’Connor were summoned for hurling on the street.

A boy named Patrick Griffin, who stated that he was employed at the boot repairing shop of Mr. MacCarthy, Market-street, gave evidence of having seen the defendants play hurley.

Cross-examined by Mr Nicholls (defending solr.): Did you actually see Patrick O’Connor hurling there and hitting the ball? – I did.

Did you see the others on the same evening? – I did.

Were they walking out to practice at the time and hitting the ball before them? – I could not swear, they were hitting the ball from one to the other on the street.

Do you know anything about hurling? – No.

You have heard the kind of game it is? Must you not have a goal at each end before you can have hurling? – Certainly.

Were there any goals on the street at that time? – No.

And must you not have fifteen men on each side? – I am not well up in the game, but I think so.

Mr. Nicholls submitted that the case must fail because the defendants were charged with playing a game of hurley on the street, but that could not be so since they had no goals up, and had not fifteen men aside.

The Head-Constable asked that the full penalty of 10s be inflicted on the defendants, as complaints had been made as to the practice. He asked Mr. Nicholls what was the weight of a hurley ball.

Mr. Nicholls: It is not for me to tell you.

Head-Constable: I thought you knew a lot about the game of hurling?

Mr. Nicholls: And so I do (laughter).

The Chairman, replying to Mr. Nicholls, said the defendants might not be playing a hurling match, but they could be playing hurling. Each of the defendants was fined 2s. 6d.

1940

Lemonade prosecution

Stated to be the first case of the kind brought in Galway, Martin McIntyre, Upper Bohermore, was fined £1 (without expenses) by District Justice Mac Giollarnath for “unlawfully keeping a refreshment house without being licensed contrary to Section 9 of the Refreshment House and Wine Licences (Ireland) Act, 1860.

John Kelly said that in April last, he was attached to the Customs at Galway. On the 18th of that month, he visited the defendant’s premises, a small shop, at approximately 10.15pm, and called for a bottle of lemonade, paid for it and consumed it on the premises.

He asked the proprietor if he had a refreshment house licence, and he said that he was not aware he had to have one.

Cross-examined by Mr. O’Donnell (solr.), the witness said that he believed this was the first case of its kind to be brought in Galway. There was no entertainment provided on the premises.

Mr. O’Donnell held that the case would be decided on the interpretation which would be put on the word ‘Entertainment’. A lot depended on the case because it would come as a great surprise to many people to find out that they had to pay revenue in certain circumstances to sell lemonade.

He asked the Justice not to impose any penalty until they got in touch with the Revenue Commissioners. This shop had since been closed.

Unprecedented drought

Many rivers in County Galway have reached their lowest level within living memory, water supplies are being anxiously watched, and in many districts, water in barrels is being carried for miles and cattle driven long distances to drink, following a summer of almost unprecedented drought.

The real gravity of the situation was disclosed at the monthly meeting of the Galway County Board of Health, where it was stated that ‘six months’ continuous rain would be wanted in many areas.

The meeting had before it a letter received from the County Secretary, Mr. C.I. O Floinn, urging the necessity of making alternative arrangements for pumping water in cases where pumps are at present operated by electricity from the Shannon scheme, so that in the event of a breakdown of existing electricity supplies, the continuity of water supplies may not be affected.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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The construction of a new wheelchair-friendly footbridge by Galway Corporation over the Friar’s River Canal at Newtownsmith on October 20, 1998. It replaced the old temporary bridge that had become dangerous and could not take wheelchairs.

1922

Posting poor returns

Postal rates and telephone charges in Ireland are at the moment probably as high as they are in any country in the world, higher than they are in most.

The penny post has been restored in Great Britain, following the wage cut, which was introduced without any stoppage in the public service.

And the postal facilities in Ireland at the moment are probably worse than in any civilised state in the world. This is not altogether the fault of those who control the post office.

But, while much of this is due to conditions over which postal officials can have no control, a very considerable percentage of it is due to a badly run post office.

There is something very rotten in a service that loses a million a year, and yet gives the public only very indifferent results; for not merely are the Irish people paying abnormal postal and telegraph rates, but they are paying for the deficit in the form of taxation, so that their letters cost them much more than twopence.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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A little girl celebrates Sarsfields’ success in the County Hurling Final in 1997.

1922

The ‘pay-nobodies’

The righteous wrath of members of Galway County Council very properly manifested itself against the “pay nobodies” at the meeting on Saturday last.

“I am quite satisfied,” declared Dr. Walsh, “that numbers of people who defend the policy of not paying rates are thoroughly dishonest.”

Mr. Kennedy said the policy to-day was to pay nobody and the people who were in debt themselves “wanted everybody else to be in the same position”.

Mr. Tierney invoked the dictum of the Irish Hierarchy in regard to the payment of just and lawful debts. Verily, “there are greater thieves than Cacus” – men who have such noble and patriotic notions that, to their mind, national freedom is synonymous with freedom from just and lawful obligations. It is time the people paid their rates and debts and gave up their outworn cant.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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Oil-covered swans being rescued for cleaning from the water at the Claddagh following an oil spill into the River Corrib in March 2001. A spillage upstream reached the Claddagh Basin and dozens of swans had to be removed to a sanctuary for safe keeping. About 20 swans were so contaminated that they either died or had to be put down.

1922

Temperance club

A long-felt want in Galway has been supplied this week by the opening on Monday night of the temperance club in the Columban Hall.

The club, which will be carried on under the committee of the Pioneer Association, is not confined exclusively to pioneers, but will be open to persons who have a pledge against the use of alcoholic drinks.

There will be an entrance fee of 2s. and a nominal payment for members of 6d. a month will be required to pay expenses. It is intended to provide games, etc., on the premises and in the near future to organise concerts, debates, conversazione, etc.

Rev. Father Stapleton, director of the Pioneer Association, is interesting himself in the club, and those who know the kindly soggarth aroon’s organising capacity have no doubt as to the future success of the club.

Those desirous of joining should call at the hall any night during the week between the hours of 7 and 10.30 p.m.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

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