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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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A stolen van being recovered from the River Corrib in January 1969. The van, owned by Mr. John Molloy, Mervue, was raised from the river bed under the directions of Mr. George Ryder, Greenfields, a member of the Galway Sub-Aqua Club.

1918

Threat to kill

A savage assault was committed at Montiagh, Galway, on Monday, in which a man named John Rooney, a resident in the locality, was brutally attacked and maimed with a razor. It appears that on that morning Rooney left his house to accompany his brother, who had been out discharging his duties as water bailiff on Lough Corrib.  Meanwhile, the latter had come into contact with two poaches named John Moran and Patk. Duggan, and when he arrived Duggan, it is alleged, pulled out a razor with which he inflicted a terrible wound on John Rooney’s head, threatening to kill him.

The affray developed apparently into a terrible struggle between the brothers and the poachers. Some friends of the latter rushed to the scene and joined in the fracas. John Rooney was held by them, while, it is stated, Duggan terribly scarred him in the head and arms with the razor. It is feared that some of the wounds will have a permanent disabling effect.

Maltings robbery

The malting stores of Messrs. D.E. Williams, Tullamore, were found to be raided during the week, and, from the particulars to hand, upwards of thirty barrels of barley are missing. When the discovery was made a number of screws were found to be removed from the locks and hinges of the doors.

It is alleged by the proprietors that the premises were broken into last year about the same time and a quantity of malt taken. During the summer months the premises are closed, but a visit was paid recently by an official of the firm. Mr. Hildebrand visited the scene after the reported occurrence and investigations are being pursued.

Pay day shortage

Owing to shortage, the Banks were unable to pay sufficient silver to the constabulary on pay day.

1943

Revellers shouting

The Corporation heard complaints that some people indulged in ‘shouting and bawling’ on their way home from dances, and the Co. Manager, Mr C.I. O’Flynn, was asked to consider the action that should be taken to deal with offenders.

Mr. J. Burke asked if the Corporation had any by-laws to prohibit rowdyism on the streets at night, People coming from dances did a considerable amount of shouting and bawling at all hours of the night and he understood that no by-laws existed under which the Guards could take action against the offenders.

Ald. Brennan: It is horrible down our way. When one opens his mouth about this thing, it is said that he is objecting to dance halls, but that is not so.

Manager: If you ask the Guards to take the matter up, will you raise objections during Race Week. You all know what happens in Race Week in Galway.

Ald. Miss Ashe: That is one week in which we must give the people a free hand.

Ald. Brennan: This shouting goes on every week of the year.

Mr. O’Flaherty: Every person is on a rather joyous mood during Race Week and we should not have any action taken then.

Lighting charges

If they cut out public lighting, they might have a reign of vandalism in the city, said Mr. W. Faller at Thursday’s meeting of the Galway Corporation, when the curtailment of public lighting was under consideration.

The discussion arose when a letter was read from the E.S.B. in reply to questions raised by Ald. Brennan last month about the valuation charges in Galway compared with the valuation charges in other parts of the county. The letter stated that the charges for such large urban areas as Sligo, Drogheda, Kilkenny, Tralee, Wexford and Clonmel were identical with those which it supplied in Galway.

Bus cancellation row

Galway Corporation on Thursday added its voice to the protest already made by His Worship, Ald. J.F. Costello, P.C., against the complete withdrawal of the Galway-Salthill ‘bus service and decided to ask the G.S.R. to provide a service of twenty double runs between the city and Salthill every day for the convenience of business people and school children.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

 

Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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The construction of a new wheelchair-friendly footbridge by Galway Corporation over the Friar’s River Canal at Newtownsmith on October 20, 1998. It replaced the old temporary bridge that had become dangerous and could not take wheelchairs.

1922

Posting poor returns

Postal rates and telephone charges in Ireland are at the moment probably as high as they are in any country in the world, higher than they are in most.

The penny post has been restored in Great Britain, following the wage cut, which was introduced without any stoppage in the public service.

And the postal facilities in Ireland at the moment are probably worse than in any civilised state in the world. This is not altogether the fault of those who control the post office.

But, while much of this is due to conditions over which postal officials can have no control, a very considerable percentage of it is due to a badly run post office.

There is something very rotten in a service that loses a million a year, and yet gives the public only very indifferent results; for not merely are the Irish people paying abnormal postal and telegraph rates, but they are paying for the deficit in the form of taxation, so that their letters cost them much more than twopence.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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A little girl celebrates Sarsfields’ success in the County Hurling Final in 1997.

1922

The ‘pay-nobodies’

The righteous wrath of members of Galway County Council very properly manifested itself against the “pay nobodies” at the meeting on Saturday last.

“I am quite satisfied,” declared Dr. Walsh, “that numbers of people who defend the policy of not paying rates are thoroughly dishonest.”

Mr. Kennedy said the policy to-day was to pay nobody and the people who were in debt themselves “wanted everybody else to be in the same position”.

Mr. Tierney invoked the dictum of the Irish Hierarchy in regard to the payment of just and lawful debts. Verily, “there are greater thieves than Cacus” – men who have such noble and patriotic notions that, to their mind, national freedom is synonymous with freedom from just and lawful obligations. It is time the people paid their rates and debts and gave up their outworn cant.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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Oil-covered swans being rescued for cleaning from the water at the Claddagh following an oil spill into the River Corrib in March 2001. A spillage upstream reached the Claddagh Basin and dozens of swans had to be removed to a sanctuary for safe keeping. About 20 swans were so contaminated that they either died or had to be put down.

1922

Temperance club

A long-felt want in Galway has been supplied this week by the opening on Monday night of the temperance club in the Columban Hall.

The club, which will be carried on under the committee of the Pioneer Association, is not confined exclusively to pioneers, but will be open to persons who have a pledge against the use of alcoholic drinks.

There will be an entrance fee of 2s. and a nominal payment for members of 6d. a month will be required to pay expenses. It is intended to provide games, etc., on the premises and in the near future to organise concerts, debates, conversazione, etc.

Rev. Father Stapleton, director of the Pioneer Association, is interesting himself in the club, and those who know the kindly soggarth aroon’s organising capacity have no doubt as to the future success of the club.

Those desirous of joining should call at the hall any night during the week between the hours of 7 and 10.30 p.m.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

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