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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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Charles Haughey, Minister for Finance, lays a wreath at the statue of Liam Mellowes in Eyre Square in Galway in Easter 1969, watched by an attendance including members of the Old IRA who served with Liam Mellowes during the 1916 Rising.

1918

Prominent Sinn Féiner arrested

On Thursday morning, Mr. Lawrence Lardner, Athenry, was arrested and conveyed to Galway, and charged before Mr. J. Kilbride, R.M., with illegal drilling at Athenry on March 16 and 17.

Head-Constable Sweeney, Athenry, verified an information in which he stated that at 8.50p.m. on March 16, he was on duty at Athenry railway station, accompanied by Constable Burke, and he saw some eighty Volunteers lined up in two ranks on the platform. Lawrence Lardner, who was in charge of them, gave the command “left turn”, “quick march”.

Witness went up to him and asked him was he drilling the party. Accused replied “I am”. Witness told him he was acting illegally. Accused said “I do not think it is illegal” and marched them into the main road when he gave the command “halt”, “form fours”, “quick march”.

He then brought them to Murphy’s Hotel, where they were halted, and addressed by Frank Fahy, who came from Dublin by train. After the address, accused gave the command “Battalion”, “right turn”, dismiss”.

On St. Patrick’s Day, witness saw accused wearing a Volunteer uniform and in charge of the Volunteer contingents who attended the Sinn Féin demonstration at Athenry. After the meeting, he marched some of the contingents to Murphy’s Hotel, where he gave the command “halt”, “left turn”, “dress up”. He afterwards took out a whistle on which he sounded a long call as a signal for the contingents to be dismissed by their commandants.

Accused declined to cross-examine, and, on refusing to give bail, was remanded in custody for eight days.

1943

Air raid exercised

High officers from Civil Defence Headquarters in Dublin were keenly interested spectators of A.R.P. work in connection with air raid exercises which took place in Galway and Salthill last Sunday. The object of their visit was to ascertain at first hand the state of preparedness here, and we understand that at a meeting of the coordination committee, they expressed considerable satisfaction at what they had seen. The siren car set out on its warning rounds at 2.15pm, and promptly at 3pm, a high explosive bomb dropped on the East side of Eyre Square, wrecking that popular hostelry, Bailey’s Hotel, and adjoining houses and rendering twenty people homeless.

There were a number of casualties and some unfortunate people were trapped in the debris, their rescue being made more difficult by an outbreak of fire in the ruins. A huge bomb crater was created in the street and live electric cables which had been flung down, increased the danger for all concerned.

Of course, the onlookers saw nothing of all this. To their uninformed eyes, the East side of the Square was just the same after the bomb fell as it was before that incident. Instead of being trapped in the debris, the occupants of the adjacent houses were standing at their windows, viewing the operations. Only a great circle chalked in the roadway marked the “crater”.

But when the defence organisations hastened to the scene, it was very different. The L.S.F. took charge of the street and cordoned off the danger zone; rescue and demolition squads dashed up in their lorry, and the firefighters also made a swift appearance, while the first-aid workers attended to the casualties and placed the hospital cases in ambulances. There were two other “incidents” at the Fish Market and in the vicinity of Salthill Post Office.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

 

 

Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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A little girl celebrates Sarsfields’ success in the County Hurling Final in 1997.

1922

The ‘pay-nobodies’

The righteous wrath of members of Galway County Council very properly manifested itself against the “pay nobodies” at the meeting on Saturday last.

“I am quite satisfied,” declared Dr. Walsh, “that numbers of people who defend the policy of not paying rates are thoroughly dishonest.”

Mr. Kennedy said the policy to-day was to pay nobody and the people who were in debt themselves “wanted everybody else to be in the same position”.

Mr. Tierney invoked the dictum of the Irish Hierarchy in regard to the payment of just and lawful debts. Verily, “there are greater thieves than Cacus” – men who have such noble and patriotic notions that, to their mind, national freedom is synonymous with freedom from just and lawful obligations. It is time the people paid their rates and debts and gave up their outworn cant.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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Oil-covered swans being rescued for cleaning from the water at the Claddagh following an oil spill into the River Corrib in March 2001. A spillage upstream reached the Claddagh Basin and dozens of swans had to be removed to a sanctuary for safe keeping. About 20 swans were so contaminated that they either died or had to be put down.

1922

Temperance club

A long-felt want in Galway has been supplied this week by the opening on Monday night of the temperance club in the Columban Hall.

The club, which will be carried on under the committee of the Pioneer Association, is not confined exclusively to pioneers, but will be open to persons who have a pledge against the use of alcoholic drinks.

There will be an entrance fee of 2s. and a nominal payment for members of 6d. a month will be required to pay expenses. It is intended to provide games, etc., on the premises and in the near future to organise concerts, debates, conversazione, etc.

Rev. Father Stapleton, director of the Pioneer Association, is interesting himself in the club, and those who know the kindly soggarth aroon’s organising capacity have no doubt as to the future success of the club.

Those desirous of joining should call at the hall any night during the week between the hours of 7 and 10.30 p.m.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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Angela O'Keefe, Chairwoman of Music for Galway, pictured with a £16,000 Steinway grand piano just after it was delivered to University College Galway, ahead of its assembly in the Aula Maxima. Music for Galway fundraised to buy the piano which had to be transported from London after its purchase.

1922

Tackling drink

The International Congress on Prohibition sitting in Brussels reports that the liquor problem is substantially the same everywhere. In Ireland at present alcoholism has for us a tragic interest.

At no period in Irish history has there been so great a consumption of alcoholic liquors. Prohibition, even if it were practicable, would not solve the problem. America has taught us that lesson.

Scarcely a week passes that the American hospital registers do not record the death from alcoholic poisoning on a scale unprecedented before the country went “dry”.

The drink problem will never be successfully tackled in Ireland until such time as the public cooperate with the authorities in a rigid enforcement of the licensing laws and the drunkard is regarded as a pariah in a respectable community.

In this connection the announcement made at the last Galway parish court that persons found guilty of illicit distillation will be sent to jail without the option of a fine will be welcomed.

This is a step in the right direction and should act as a deterrent to people at present engaged in a traffic which is slowly poisoning the lives, in the moral as well as the physical sense, of large numbers of our people in outlying portions of the country.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

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