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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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Among the prizewinners at Feis Cheoil an Iarthar in the Columban Hall, Sea Road, Galway, in October 1965 were Peigín Ní Fhathartaigh, Máirín Ní Ghriallais, Áine Ní Loideáin and Máire Ní Mháille, all from Coláiste Chroí Mhuire, Spiddal.

1916

Missing motor car

Acts of blackguardism are frequently perpetrated under the guise of practical jokes. On last Thursday night whilst two motorists were at a dance in the Town Hall, their car was taken, and having been driven all over the city, was left in a damaged condition a couple of miles out the Tuam road. The episode will probably cost the ratepayers £60, and this robs the occurrence of any title to be classed in the category of practical jokes.

Mr. Fred Statford, M.P.S., having as passenger Mr. O. Browne, drove into the city at 1 o’clock on Thursday night, leaving a new Morris Cowley car, which cost something like £300, standing outside the Town Hall.

Both gentlemen entered the dancing room, and in the morning, they found that the car had disappeared.

When found, the lights were still burning and the steering gear was seriously damaged. The engine had become so chilled with the night air that there was considerable difficulty in starting hit.

The matter has been reported to the Commercial Union Insurance Co., a claim has been lodged, and will be heard at the Quarter Sessions in Galway about the 28th January. We have not yet heard at what sum damages have been placed, but probably about £50 will be claimed, and this, with costs, will result in a nice levy upon the ratepayers of Galway for the action of two undetected blackguards.

A brave end

Mr. Michael Spain, Palmerston, Portumna, has during the past week received the sad news that his son, Henry Spain, a private in the 13th Battalion Canadians, was killed in action on the 1st December in France.

Spain went to America some years ago when quite a boy. When the war broke out, he crossed to Canada and came over with the Canadian contingent. He has been twice wounded. His father and mother are alive, and the greatest sympathy is felt for them in the sad tidings conveyed to them during the holy season.

They have four other sons in the fighting line, viz.: Joseph, Connaught Rangers (Mesopotamia); Michael, Leinsters (at present on sick leave from Salonika, who was also at the Dardanelles); Patrick, Leinsters (Salonika); Christopher, Artillery (Salonika). They have also four nephews, two grandsons in the army, and a son-in-law, Patrick Monahan, a prisoner in Germany.

Pte. Spain brings the roll of honour of Portumna men up to 11 killed since the outbreak of the war.

1941

Turning to God

“The fundamental condition for world peace is the reign of Christ in the souls of men,” said His Lordship, the Most Rev. Dr. Browne, Bishop of Galway, at Pontifical High Mass in St. Nicholas’s Cathedral, Galway, on Christmas Day.

There could never be true peace unless men and rulers and states recognised and observed the moral law, and they would not observe the moral law unless they believed in God and in His son, Jesus Christ, declared His Lordship.

His Lordship, the Bishop, said that the message of the angels, “Glory to God in the Highest and on earth peace to men of good-will,” rang out to-day all over a world that paid little heed.

It rang out to a world that was not bathed in the soft light of peace, but in blood and tears. Instead of peace, there was war – war with a degree of suffering, misery and destruction that the world had never known before.

Terrible forces of evil were unloosed; the darkest side of human nature was supreme. Brute force cared nothing for beauty and truth and goodness and the very civilisation and progress that men were so proud of were to-day threatened.

Yet it was in such dark and terrible times that they could best understand the message of Christmas because it was in such dark and terrible times that they could realise the frailty and wickedness of men and that they could recognise how much they stood in need of a Saviour – of One Who would wipe away human sin and Who would lead men to the road of justice and charity and peace.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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Looking into the future at Ballinasloe Fair in the early 1990s.

1922

Ballinasloe Show

Ballinasloe District Agricultural Show, held on Monday last, was a splendid success. Favoured by ideal weather, the attendance was a record one. Despite expectations to the contrary, the number of exhibits in every department was well up to the average, and in the cattle and sheep sections the number of entrants was nearly double that of any show held within the past few years, while the all-round quality of the exhibits showed a marked improvement and surpassed anything previously exhibited at the show.

Were it not for the postal strike, the exhibits would have been largely augmented, but taking everything into consideration, the show was indeed a very creditable one. In the horse section, the exhibits were remarkably good, and the judges had a very trying time in arriving at decisions. This can also be said of the cattle section, where the entrants were numerous and the quality particularly good.

Worthy of special note were the vegetables, the quality, despite the unfavourable season, being extra good – some of the exhibits being as good as any seen at the Dublin Show.

Not only was the arrangement good, but in the opinion of the judges, the quality was extremely good. The exhibits of fruit, though not plentiful, were very creditable to the exhibitors.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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1922

Scabs warning

An exciting incident in connection with the postal strike occurred at Mary-st., Galway, at four o’clock last Saturday afternoon.

An official of the Galway Electric Lighting Company, Ltd., accompanied by another official, had gone to the central post office at Eglinton-street to collect the letters of the company. Shortly after he had left, it was alleged that he had taken other letters for delivery in Mary-street on his way back to the works.

The strike picket immediately gave chase, and an exciting scene, which was witnessed by a number of people in the street, followed.

The officials of the company were chased into the licensed premises of Mr. J. S. Young, but it could not be found that they had delivered any letters.

“We did not see them delivering any letters,” said one of the strikers. “Anyhow, an undertaking has been signed now not to attempt to deliver any to other people.”

A few national soldiers in uniform were standing at the Eglinton-street end of Mary-street during the incident. Four lady members of the staff at the Galway central office returned to work on Saturday and were understood to be engaged upon sorting of letters recently delivered by road.

It is stated that letters are also being posted at the central boxes. Meanwhile the picket remains almost continuously “on duty” outside the office, in front of which two boards have been place, one stating, “Don’t take letters from scabs”; and another “Restricted Services – Four do the work of forty-two”.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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Children examine the carcass of a 40-foot sperm whale, beached in Loughaunrone near Oranmore in September 1997. The whale was later burned on the beach as Council engineers were concerned about the danger of seepage if the giant mammal was buried.

1922

Connemara raids

The Publicity Department, Railway Hotel, Galway, issues the following: – Mr. Richard O’Toole, Lettermore, Connemara, has been forced to leave his home as a result of a raid made upon it by irregulars and subsequent threats.

A few nights ago, a party of men came to Mr. O’Toole’s home and demanded his motor bicycle. He refused to give it. The leader of the raiders, tapping his gun, said: “Do you see this?”

“Shoot away,” was Mr. O’Toole’s reply, and the raiders are then said to have gone to the garage to look for the machine. He managed, however, to get the machine, and to make his way to Galway. The men threatened that they would return to his house on the succeeding night and take him.

He was obliged to leave some men to mind his mother, who is very nervous, and falls into a faint when a raid takes place.

The house of Mr. Cloherty at Roundstone was also visited and about £40 worth of stuff taken. Mr. Cloherty is the father of Mr. J. J. Cloherty, a well-known County Councillor, and is a strong supporter of the Treaty.

A shop in Kilkerrin was also raided, and a considerable quantity of goods taken.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

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