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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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This photograph was taken in the late 1960s. It shows Nora Divilly (nee Cosgrave) seated on the statue of Padraic O'Coniare which was a popular spot for photos while it was in Eyre Sqaure from 1935 until it was vandalised in 1999. Nora Divilly was the wife of Martin Divilly who served two terms as Mayor of Galway in 1963-64 and 1970-71. Photo courtesy of Rosemary Divilly.

1916

Further arrest

On Wednesday, a lad named Riedy, who had been missing since the Rising, was arrested and subsequently released. Although everything was peaceable in Kinvara during the Rising and since, between 20 and 30 arrests have been made and the “suspects” are still interned in spite of the efforts made for their release.

Surely it is a scandalous victimisation of the county to keep these young men in prison at a time when their services on the farms are sorely needed.

Workers drain

At present employees are being drained out of Galway (where we are unable to provide them with constant work) for munition working in England where they are earning excellent wages. Despite the spirited action of local men, the project to start, as a private limited company, a munitions factory in the city has failed, but we have strong grounds for stating that there is a probability of a £90,000 Government factory being established. The project is being well worked up locally, and has received considerable support from people in high quarters.

1941

Torpedoed crew lands

Another grim sidelight on the war at sea was revealed at Galway docks early on Friday morning when, ill-clad, haggard, starving and bone-weary, twenty-one members of a torpedoed Glasgow vessel were brought ashore from the Irish steamer which had picked them up off Slyne Head on the previous day.

Members of the Galway branch of the Red Cross organisation and the Local Security Force, together with nurses from the Central Hospital, assisted the port authorities, members of the Maritime Inscription Corps, and the Gardaí in caring for the seamen.

There were ten stretcher cases, and two of the men were dangerously ill.

The Glasgow steamer was torpedoed without warning on June 7th when outward bound 1,200 miles off the Irish coast, and the captain stated that no effort was made by the submarine to save the crew. The third engineer was killed when the ship was struck.

The ship’s second lifeboat also has been picked up with the remaining eighteen of the crew.

Rat bit baby’s hand

The terrible conditions that exist in some Galway city tenements was mentioned at Thursday’s meeting of the Galway Corporation. Ald. Miss Ashe said that a rat bit a baby’s hand in one tenement in St. Augustine Street that had been closed down but later re-occupied.

Petrol scandal

Speaking in the Dáil, Mr. G Bartley touched on something which has been the cause of surprise and some resentment everywhere when he spoke of the number of private motor cars to be seen at race meetings, dog meetings and other sporting functions all over the country.

He asked where did these people get petrol, stating that he would be surprised to discover that the ration enabled them to undertake all the travelling they appeared to be in a position to enjoy.

Mr. Bartley said it was disturbing to see private cars careering about whilst vehicles which should be engaged in essential services were idle for want of fuel.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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1922

Scabs warning

An exciting incident in connection with the postal strike occurred at Mary-st., Galway, at four o’clock last Saturday afternoon.

An official of the Galway Electric Lighting Company, Ltd., accompanied by another official, had gone to the central post office at Eglinton-street to collect the letters of the company. Shortly after he had left, it was alleged that he had taken other letters for delivery in Mary-street on his way back to the works.

The strike picket immediately gave chase, and an exciting scene, which was witnessed by a number of people in the street, followed.

The officials of the company were chased into the licensed premises of Mr. J. S. Young, but it could not be found that they had delivered any letters.

“We did not see them delivering any letters,” said one of the strikers. “Anyhow, an undertaking has been signed now not to attempt to deliver any to other people.”

A few national soldiers in uniform were standing at the Eglinton-street end of Mary-street during the incident. Four lady members of the staff at the Galway central office returned to work on Saturday and were understood to be engaged upon sorting of letters recently delivered by road.

It is stated that letters are also being posted at the central boxes. Meanwhile the picket remains almost continuously “on duty” outside the office, in front of which two boards have been place, one stating, “Don’t take letters from scabs”; and another “Restricted Services – Four do the work of forty-two”.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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Children examine the carcass of a 40-foot sperm whale, beached in Loughaunrone near Oranmore in September 1997. The whale was later burned on the beach as Council engineers were concerned about the danger of seepage if the giant mammal was buried.

1922

Connemara raids

The Publicity Department, Railway Hotel, Galway, issues the following: – Mr. Richard O’Toole, Lettermore, Connemara, has been forced to leave his home as a result of a raid made upon it by irregulars and subsequent threats.

A few nights ago, a party of men came to Mr. O’Toole’s home and demanded his motor bicycle. He refused to give it. The leader of the raiders, tapping his gun, said: “Do you see this?”

“Shoot away,” was Mr. O’Toole’s reply, and the raiders are then said to have gone to the garage to look for the machine. He managed, however, to get the machine, and to make his way to Galway. The men threatened that they would return to his house on the succeeding night and take him.

He was obliged to leave some men to mind his mother, who is very nervous, and falls into a faint when a raid takes place.

The house of Mr. Cloherty at Roundstone was also visited and about £40 worth of stuff taken. Mr. Cloherty is the father of Mr. J. J. Cloherty, a well-known County Councillor, and is a strong supporter of the Treaty.

A shop in Kilkerrin was also raided, and a considerable quantity of goods taken.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

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The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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Thatching one of the houses on Shantalla Road, just up from Cooke's Corner, in the 1970s.

1922

The third Dáil

The first meeting of the third Dáil held on Saturday morning last at Leinster House, Kildare-street, the premises of the Royal Dublin Society, recalled for a few minutes some of the stormy scenes at Westminster when Irish affairs were being discussed.

On Saturday, as then, Mr Laurence Ginnell was the central figure. He is apparently always cast for the role of obstructionist in politics, and on Saturday he made full use of his opportunity, with the result that, as at Westminster, he was carried form his seat by three stalwart attendants and expelled from the Assembly.

The Dáil met in the theatre of the house, a semi-circular room with seats rising tier upon tier from an open space in the centre. At the back of the last row of seats there is a promenade, and for some time before the Dáil was due to open, Mr. Ginnell, black band in hand and slouch, hat on head, marched round and round, speaking to no one, but apparently, like an arch conspirator, deep in thought.

Probably he felt lonely, for he was the only one of the anti-treaty members elected to the Dáil who put in an appearance. Miss MacSwiney and the rest, who were known to be in Dublin, have presumably decided to observe a policy of abstention.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

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