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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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Eyre Square, Galway on a fair day probably in the 1880s. In the foreground is a horsedrawn tram setting off on the two-and-a-half-mile journey to Salthill. Operated by the Galway and Salthill Tramway Co, the tramline opened in 1879. The advertising board on the top level of the tram refers to Alexander Moon General Draper which operated for over a century in the city, latterly simply as Moons, before being taken over by Brown Thomas in 1995.

1916

Church searched

We are prohibited by the Irish Press Censor from publishing correspondence that took place between Rev. T. Burke, P.P., Kinvara, and General Sir John Maxwell on the subject below.

Every man, woman and child in Kinvara parish and district, and most people throughout Co. Galway and the West, know that Kinvara Church and Convent have been searched by armed police.

A great many well-informed people are aware that the revered parish priest, the Rev. T. Burke, has made a strong protest to General Sir John Maxwell, the Military Governor of Ireland.

The following proposal was unanimously adopted at the conference of priests of the Diocese of Kilmacduagh:

“We, the priests of the diocese of Kilmacduagh, have heard with amazement of an outrage perpetrated against the Convent of Mercy and community, Kinvara, on Sunday, 4th June, by the police, who said they came to search the convent for rebels.

“We enter out solemn protest against their search of the convent, and we say that the search, and the manner in which that search was made, was a gross outrage on religion and an uncalled-for indignity and insult to the nuns.

“Catholics well know that religious Sisters never harbour strangers or externs in their convent, and that nuns’ cells are privileged, no strangers being allowed to enter them.

“This immunity was violated by the police, and the manner in which the cells were searched was equally offensive to manliness and common decency.”

The affair at Kinvara has been grossly mishandled from the beginning, and the characteristically Prussian attitude of the new censorship in Ireland does not improve, but considerably aggravates a painful situation.

Surely the military governors of this country ought to be able to defend their own attitude, and the attitude of their subordinates, without resorting to the equivocal expedient of a clumsy endeavour to conceal from the public all the facts.

Even from their own standpoint, the attitude of the censor in this respect is extremely stupid. It makes a mystery where none existed, and renders the people suspicious of an authority that resorts to methods that are given so sinister an aspect.

1941

Turf cutters protected

Four men returned to work under Garda protection on the County Council turf scheme at Glennaun bog, Inverin of Monday. Forty-one workers are still idle.

Garda reinforcements have been drafted in from Spiddal and Carraroe and it is feared that the dispute may take a more serious turn. The strike began when fifteen workers were laid off on the plea that there was not sufficient work available for them.

The workers refused to accept this plea and pointed out that there was plenty of work on the bog for all. The dispute has now dragged on for over three weeks.

Blow to holiday traffic

The holiday traffic this year has sustained a very serious blow by the decision of the Great Southern Company not to run Sunday excursion trains. It will cause thousands of Dubliners to spend Sundays quietly in their gardens, but the demand for bicycles on the part of young people has already increased amazingly. I think there will be a scarcity of bicycles soon.

The loss of income for those dependant on the tourist business for a living will be a serious matter. But the railway company has no alternative; it has not enough coal to carry on the services.

Timber fuel dump

About ten or fifteen thousand tons of timber unsuitable for building construction or other commercial purposes are to be stored at South Park, Galway, by Fuel Importers (Eire) Ltd, a company formed for the purposes of conserving fuel supplies throughout the country. Fuel dumps are also to be established in other parts of the country.

The timber – secured through the clearing of scrub and the removal from State forests of trees unsuitable for any purpose other than firewood – will be brought into Galway from Monivea, Cong and Woodford, and will not be released for firing unless an emergency should arise.

Cycling fans

Galway 0-10 Mayo 1-5

A great effort by J. McGauren not only saved his net in the last minute of the game, but saved Galway from a point defeat at the hands of Mayo in the first round of the Connacht senior football championship at Tuam.

Several thousand people – most of them cyclists – saw Galway qualify to meet Roscommon or Sligo in the provincial final next  month.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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A competitor in the high jump at Shantalla Sports on July 25, 1971.

1921

Treaty perspective

This morning’s development in connection with the Irish Peace Treaty should be viewed in its proper perspective. Whilst Mr. de Valera has thought well to repudiate, in effect – for that is what his statement means – the agreement come to by his colleagues with the British Peace Plenipotentiaries, he says that “there is a definite constitutional way for resolving our potential differences”.

It is, to say the least, unfortunate that the five men who were given the plenary powers to negotiate on September 14 last, who worked patiently towards a settlement for weeks, who had the confidence of the whole nation, should have to face a new fight for peace on their return.

There can, of course, be little doubt as to the outcome of that fight, but we fear, as this morning’s “Independent” points out, that the crisis is likely to strengthen the position of the partitionists of the North East corner.

If the Dáil makes a decision in favour of Peace on a Wednesday, no one will question that decision; and it would be far better that this should happen than that there should be an appeal to Caesar at this critical period.

In all Anglo-Irish history there has been no such week as this. Following a period when hope swung back to the borderland of despair came the dramatic news that a Treaty of Peace between Great Britain and Ireland had been signed.

The news seemed too good to be true. It was almost unbelievable that a quarrel of seven hundred and fifty years had been solved in a night; that while people slept there had been established in a quiet street off Whitehall a Treaty whereby the shackles were struck from Ireland, and this ancient nation was left free to pursue her own destiny.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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Molly Browne singing 'Here's a toast to you Claddagh at the foot of Fairhill' at the opening of Claddagh Festival on August 1, 1976.

1921

Tackling food prices
We trust that there will be a good attendance and a united effort to get an efficient committee at the Anti-Profiteering Committee’s preliminary meeting at the Town Hall at 7.30 p.m. on Tuesday. A real effort should be made to secure that people of independent standing, whose courage in the public interest can be relied on, are put on the committee.
What is wanted more than anything else is a little grit, and our criticisms, we are glad to note, have already gone far to encourage this. We welcome Dr. Walsh’s reference, even though belated, to the price charged for essential foodstuffs, such as bread and milk, in Galway.
But what of gas at 10s. 10d.? Wicklow has decided that 7s. 6d. is an ample price to pay, and Wicklow has refused to accept anything but Irish arbitration on the price.
In consequence, Wicklow town has buckled its armour and reversed the usual order of things by cutting off the gas company and is resorting to other means of lighting and heating. And it has been found that wonders can now be achieved on paraffin oil!
Mr. Fallon, of Abbeygate-street, advises in our columns today meat at from 9d. to 1s. per lb., and in consequence Mr. Fallon can rely upon crowds of customers, whilst those of his colleagues, who refuse to face facts, can stand with folded arms and unclaimed carcases.
Messrs. Commins and Greany are selling an ordinary twig at 1s. 6d., which it cost 5s. 6d. to purchase a few months ago. Above all, the new profiteering committee should watch the public market, ensuring that local people should have the food in preference to the exporter.

1946

Light agenda
The Oughterard Development Association has invited the three West Galway T.D.s to a conference on Sunday next to discuss ways and means of redressing local grievances. The main items on the agenda are the question of providing a modern sewerage system and the proposed extension of E.S.B. current to the town.
It is understood that the plans for the sewerage system are now in their final stage and only awaiting the sanction of the Department. The T.D.s will be asked to see that sanction be forthcoming as speedily as possible.
The people argue that if unlimited financial resources can be made available to open up new tourist centres in out-of-the-way places, some consideration should be given to the claims of long-established centres like Oughterard.

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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Islanders after they greeted the Archbishop of Tuam, Dr Joseph Cunnane, who had travelled to Aran to perform the island's first Confirmations in four years at St Brigid's Church, Kilronan, on June 25, 1970.

1911

Opening old wounds

“The incoherent explanation of the Irish Office will convince many that what was most feared in Ireland is true – namely, that the British Government, while negotiations for ‘peace’ are in progress, while a truce is in operation, have set about organising the most horrible of all kinds of war in Ireland – the fanatical religious wars of the seventeenth century.”

Ireland has very good reason to be suspicious of English politicians who come to her bearing gifts. We need scarcely wonder that the revelations so opportunely made during the week of an attempt to raise a secret Orange army have created a spirit of uneasiness throughout the country.

If there is to be Irish Peace, all parties to that peace must work steadily towards it. There must be sincerity and plain dealing and these presuppose good-will, the sedulous avoidance of causes of friction, and the preparation for a period when uncertainties and tragedies of to-day will have passed into an evil memory.

So far as Ireland outside the six counties in concerned, the manner in which the Truce has been observed has won the admiration even of those of our political enemies who are not altogether blinded by prejudice. Nothing has been done either by word or action that would embarrass the men who are charged with the high task of bringing to Ireland the greatest of all gifts – namely, a lasting peace – and of bringing to England that which her politicians declare they most ardently desire – namely, an end to the century-old conflict that has embarrassed them in every corner of the globe where friendly international relations are of vital importance to their wellbeing.

Whilst the majority of people in Ireland have left no doubt as to their earnest desire for an honourable settlement, the scenes that have taken place in the home of the Partition Parliament since Friday last are such as to shock humanity.

Whilst it was learned last evening that the Curlew restrictions and the steps taken by the authorities had restored tranquillity for a time, it was also learned that two further victims had succumbed to the uncontrolled mob.

The death of these two who had been wounded in the previous day’s rioting brings the number of victims during the week in Belfast up to the alarming total of twenty, whilst over seventy have been wounded, and many more have been rendered homeless.

In the midst of these horrors, it is openly charged against the British Government, which is negotiating with Ireland for peace, that it is at the same time secretly conniving at the establishment of an “Ulster” Army, which, as the Parliament of the North-East has no funds, the Government will obviously finance.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

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