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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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Staff at Dubarry Shoemakers in Ballinasloe mark 40 years of business in the town on June 1, 1972.

1922

Having their say

Admittedly the Irish people are entitled to have that which they themselves desire. They are the sovereign authority.

When they voted under the shadow of alien guns and bayonets, they showed their scorn for alien rule. To-day, voting under certain disadvantages, but as a people for whom freedom has been won, they have revealed their mid after a fashion that can leave no lingering doubt as to their real desires.

They desire order and peace, instead of disorder and chaos. They have voted for industrial expansion and employment instead of demoralisation and distress that sound economic and national development may cause the whine of distress to cease throughout the land, the tragedy of bankrupt towns and businesses to end, and the atrophying blight of cumulative decay to stop.

They want construction and common-sense instead of destruction and whirling words. They want the chapter of Black-and-Tannery to be closed forever, English domination and interference to cease, and a new Ireland to emerge, making the most of that which it has gained and marching forwards towards greater development in the future.

This is the plain lesson written across all the declared results in the country – and all of them have been declared, with the exception of West Cork, where a hitch has occurred owing to tampering with ballot boxes.

In a Dáil of 120 members so far elected, but thirty-four of the old Anti-Treaty party have been returned. Some of these retain uncontested seats, where their fate was not put to the test. Fifty-five of the members who voted for peace and settlement return to the house.

Search for relations

William Walsh, who is believed to have been born in Aughrim, County Galway, Ireland, a son of Patrick Walsh and Catherine Molloy, who are believed to have been married in Galway about ninety years ago, came to Australia in 1857, died at St. Arnaud, in the State of Victoria, Australia, on the eight day of December, 1920.

By his Will he left the residue of his estate to his first cousins and each of their children living at the date of his death in Ireland. Persons claiming to be cousins or children of the above named William Walsh are herby requested to forward their claims and proofs of their relationship to the undermentioned Solicitor pursuant to a direction made on the thirty-first day of October, 1921, by the Chief Clerk of the Supreme Court of Victoria – William Mitchell, St. Arnaud, Victoria, Australia, Solicitor for the executor of the above-named William Walsh, and to send copies of such claims and proofs to William Roche & Sons, 20 Stephen’s Green North, Dublin, Agents for the Executor’s Solicitor.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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on

"How do Jacob's get the figs into the Fig Rolls?" was a question that captured the imagination of Ireland when it was first used as part of a marketing campaign by Jacob's for their leading biscuit. Jim Figgerty, pictured here with locals in Loughrea on July 3, 1970, was the only man with the answer! Played by actor Patrick Griffin, Jim Figgerty was part of the company's television campaign in the 1960s and early 1970s and visited towns across the country to promote the brand.

1922

The demon drink

The most contemptible of all types of mankind is he who partakes of intoxicating drink throughout the entire day and far into the night. He is never drunk, nor is he ever sober. He is appropriately called a “soaker”.

At the meeting of the Ard-Fheis, Mr. de Valera made a statement which, to those who do not understand the full significance, may not have appeared very germane to the issue. But we are given to understand that his declaration that he was “sorry the drink evil was coming again to the country” was timely, and ought to be followed up with strong action by those upon whom the discipline and good conduct of the Irish people, and the army, which is their servant, depends.

Mr de Valera said he believed he was expressing the united view of every member of the Dáil and of the Officer Board of Sinn Féin when he said that he believed Ireland was really in danger the time the drink evil came back. They wanted the support of the organisation to end that evil, and generally, restore order.

We are informed by clergymen who know rural County Galway and the habits of the people intimately that the young men of to-day do not drink to intoxication, but they have acquired more dangerous habits in certain areas: they “soak” drink for long periods at a time, and their addled minds are, therefore, open to any suggestion of mischief or evil, whilst their power to do honest work such as strong clean men glory in is dulled.

Inevitably, demoralisation follows. We trust that this tale of degeneracy is exaggerated, but we very much fear that it is too true. The fact that Mr. de Valera should make public reference to it at the Ard-Fheis is significant.

“Half the mischief,” a well-known clergyman informs us, “is hatched out at cross-roads public houses by men who spend hours there when they might be doing honest work at home.”

It is well that the country should be aroused immediately to this most insidious of all dangers, for if alcoholic demoralisation should spread, then of a surety the road to utter demoralisation and ruin would be a speedy one to travel, and all the best traditions of our Irish manhood would soon be undermined.

Although we do not, and never have, advocated total abstinence against temperance, better a thousand times that we should lose altogether the liberty to touch intoxicants than that our young men, and, alas, also some of our women, should be reduced to the degrading level of “soakers”.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

 

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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Some of those confirmed at Kilmacduagh on May 6, 1970.

1922

Collins interview

Mr. Michael Collins told Mr. John Steele of the “Chicago Tribune” in an interview to which the romantic interest of the head of a new State attaches that he had just returned from the country where he had spent the week-end reading John Mitchell’s account of the American Revolution and the years following.

This might pass, he said, for a history of the present days in Ireland – “there are the same divisions, the same disorders, the same rebellious elements. America won thorough. So shall we.”

Following this optimistic note, the head of the Provisional Government told Mr. Steele that if Mr. de Valera and his followers refuse to cooperate to end the campaign of anarchy, then he is prepared to fight.

But it will not be civil war. It will be simply a police measure. “If this peace effort fails,” he is reported to have said, “then there will be no other. Every avenue of co-operation will have been explored, and we shall have to take strong action to restore order in the country. It is not an easy problem; for a revolutionary Government, in the nature of things, must take some account of motives. There is a lot of plain looting, robbery and violence going on.

“That is common criminality and must be punished. Also, there is a certain amount of commandeering from what, after all, is a patriotic, if misguided motive. That, too, must be stopped; but it requires a different method. Then there is the question of disarmament. There are too many guns in the country – uncontrolled guns, I mean – and they’ve got to be got in. a gun is a dangerous thing for a young man to have. Some day he may use it in a quarrel over a girl, or over a shilling, or over a word. That is one of the problems the revolutionary Government has got to solve, and is determined to solve, but it cannot be done in a day or two.”

He added that Irish people had the right to vote at an election, even if they voted wrongly.

Second bite of apple

The residence of Captain Gardiner, Lismanny, was raided by armed men on Saturday night and a Ford car taken.

It is stated that when visited some time ago, the car could not be taken away as it was out of order and the raiders had to content themselves by taking the wheels.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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on

County Galway dancers who won many trophies in competitions over two weeks in June 1967 pictured with their trophies in Eyre Square on June 26, 1967. From left: Breda Keedy, Ballinasloe, who won the shield for the single jig at Athlone Feis, Mary Kelly, Ballinasloe, who won the minor championship (under 11) at Athlone and the minor championship at Drumshambo Feis, Esther McGough, Tuam, who won the under 9 championship at Athlone and Rosemary Mannion, Gort who won the minor competition at Carrickedmund, Co Westmeath and the under 13 competition at Athlone.

1922

Raids and robberies

During the past week a regular epidemic of raids and robberies has taken place in and around East Galway, as a result of which considerable sums of money, jewellery, clothing etc. have been taken away from their owners.

In certain districts scarcely a residence has been immune from the midnight marauders who continue to pursue their nefarious deeds with unrelenting vigour, and in the present state of things, apparently, without fear of detection.

To the least observant, it is obvious that the parties who perpetrate these outrageous are a band who avail of the unsettled condition of affairs now existing, and all right-thinking persons, anxious for the restoration of normal conditions, will earnestly hope that peace will soon come to our distracted land so long torn by internal strife, and that there will soon be an end to crime which tends to disgrace a country once famous for its honour and chivalry.

Home raided

At two a.m. on Sunday morning the residence of Mr. John Cobban, a Presbyterian farmer living at Shanbally, about three English miles from Ballinasloe, was raided by a party of armed and disguised men who arrived in a motor car.

Entrance was affected by breaking a pane of glass in a window through which one of the party got in and opened the door for the others.

The raiders then searched the house, taking with them some jewellery, overcoats, £5 in cash, and a suit of clothes belonging to Mr. John Cobban, junr., and also his watch. Mr. Cobban is a Scotchman who has lived in the district for about fifty years.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

 

 

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