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Connacht Tribune

Galway In Days Gone By

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F. A. Lynott (Tommy Keeler), Fergus Graham (Bufallo Bill) and Michael Hannon (Charlie Davenport) in the Patrician Musical Society Production of 'Annie Get Your Gun' at the Town Hall Theatre, Galway, on April 24, 1972.

1922

Unhappy bunnies

People say there are too many guns in Ireland, but from the reports that have reached us, it seems plain that the ordinary type of sporting gun is not where it is wanted.

We learn that hundreds of acres of tillage lands throughout Galway are over-run with vermin owing to the absence of guns for some years, and that thousands of pounds in damage is being suffered by farmers owing to a regular plague of rabbits.

In one district the corn crops as well as root crops, like turnips, have been practically ruined by this pest. Every device is being resorted to, to get rid of the rabbits; tar is being put on the fields, traps and poison laid, but none of these would be as effective as a few sporting guns in the hands of responsible persons in each district.

The Irish Government should consider the question of restoring the guns to their owners before it is too late and the harvest is ruined. We shall require all the home-grown food it is possible to supply during the winter months.

Motor stolen

On Friday morning last, a number of armed men called to Miss Lynch, Barna House. Refused admission, they went round to the back of the house and took away a new ford car.

Miss Lynch is extremely popular with all sections and classes in the district.

Given ultimatum

The house of Mr. Thomas Coen, rate collector, Gort, was raided a few nights ago by armed and masked men.

Mr. Coen was taken outside, put on his knees and made swear he would withdraw a series of summonses he had issued for non-payment of rates in his district. At a court on Saturday at Gort, Mr. Coen did not proceed with the cases, which were adjourned.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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Country Living

There’s far more to a name than one might think at first

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Country Living with Francis Farragher

It’s funny at times how a small thing can set a thought process in place. Hopefully, not being too narcissistic from a newspaper point of view, as I was looking at the front-page picture on the front page of last week’s Connacht Tribune, a really delightful shot (by Seán Lydon) of a young girl from Portumna picture alongside Joe Healy and her pet lamb at Corrandulla Show, the link between names and activities/occupations struck me.

It was the prettiest of pictures of seven-year-old Isabella Dagg but straight away the link between the name and the sheep rang a bell in my brain, and took me back to one of those farm activities that as a child, I certainly had no great fondness for – yes, you’ve guessed it, dagging sheep.

This piece of ovine grooming certainly held no romance for a 12-year-old, although in fairness, my contribution to the process was mostly in the containment of the lamb or hogget that was coming under the ‘barber’s touch’ from my father’s dagging shears. The ‘dagging’ word had nearly evaporated from my brain cells until I glanced at that beautiful picture.

On a broader scale there is a very academic term to describe people of a particular name who end up in a profession that matches their moniker. We’ve all come across them here and there – the John Barber who cuts hair or the Seán Ashe who doctors trees.

Now, admittedly this has to slip into the world of grand trivia, but what else would man be doing on a showery Thursday?

Anyway from my little research probes, the scientific or academic title for this name link to occupations is ‘nominative determinism’. (Try saying that some night when you have a couple of pints extra in the tank!).

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

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The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

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Connacht Tribune

Brouder header helps Utd settle their recent wobbles

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Galway United’s Conor McCormack on the ball against Junior Quitirna of Waterford FC during the clubs' First Division encounter at Eamonn Deacy Park on Friday evening. Photo: Joe O'Shaughnessy.

Galway United 1

Waterford FC 0

Mike Rafferty at Eamonn Deacy Park

HAVING picked up just one point from their previous two games, Galway United got back to winning ways at Eamonn Deacy Park on Friday evening as a second half Killian Brouder header was enough to see off Waterford in this Airtricity First Division contest.

With the title challenge a three-horse race as leaders Cork City, Galway United and Waterford all vie for the one automatic promotion spot as champions, wins against the other contenders are vital and the outcome here allowed United move seven points clear of the third placed side, although the Southern outfit do enjoy a game in hand.

With Waterford on an eight-match winning streak under new manager Danny Searle, the game was always going to be significant, but the loss of on loan leading scorer Louis Britton to rivals Cork City last week was a blow as his ten-goal contribution played a crucial part in their challenge to date.

Galway United manager John Caulfield responded to their poor performance against Longford Town by making three changes to his starting team. Charlie Lyons got a rare opportunity to start in central defence in place of Diego Portilla, while Francely Lomboto and Stephen Walsh were introduced to the front line instead of Gary Boylan and Wilson Waweru.

Indeed both strikers had opportunities to give the home side an early advantage. On four minutes, Lomboto collected possession on the edge of the box, but after meandering his way into a shooting position, his low left footed effort went just outside a post.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

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Connacht Tribune

Door to a new world

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Michael Hegarty with his book Gateways to Psychotherapy.

Lifestyle – Michael Hegarty had a successful career in banking and finance until his world fell apart in 2008 when his marriage of 36 years ended. At a crossroads, he tentatively moved in a new direction and has since gone on to train and practise as a psychotherapist.  His own therapy sessions helped heal deeply buried childhood traumas and changed his life. He has now written a book on talk therapy to help others appreciate its benefits, as he tells BERNIE NÍ FHLATHARTA.

Never was the saying ‘when one door closes, another one opens’ as true as it was for one man who found himself on a journey of self-discovery, which led to a whole new career.

That’s exactly how Michael Hegarty became a psychotherapist, an occupation he had never anticipated.

Not only has the former banker and financial consultant been working as a psychotherapist for the past 10 years but he has just written a book explaining what’s involved.

To put it simply, it’s a practical and structured approach to talk therapy – as it says on the cover. And already, Gateways to Psychotherapy has been well received among his peers and readers at home and abroad.

Michael is brutally honest in the book’s introduction about how he stumbled into therapy. He floundered when his marriage of 36 years broke up in 2008 and says he was lost in body and soul, despite his work, swimming sessions in the gym, hill walking and fishing on the Corrib.

He didn’t think twice when his son, David, suggested he enrol in a philosophy course. This was the start of a new journey for him, one that would take him into the inner workings of his mind.

It was an emotional journey that brought hidden, repressed childhood trauma to the fore, memories of child abuse, (being sexually abused more than 400 times over two-and-a-half years, from age 12, until he put up his fists to the man responsible, who turned and walked away, looking for his next victim) abandonment (his mother disappeared for six months when he was just six. She was actually in Holles Street Hospital in Dublin) and the day-to-day struggle of being one of 12 children.

The family moved many times to accommodate his father’s banking job which resulted in Michael changing primary schools five times. He was born in Nenagh but lived in Westport, County Mayo; Tullow, County Carlow; Enniscorthy, County Wexford; and Kenmare, County Kerry, before he himself joined the bank straight from Leaving Cert at 17.

He subsequently lived and worked in Castletownbere, West Cork; Doon, County Limerick; Dunlavin, County Wicklow; Dunmanway, West Cork; and Cork City before arriving in Galway in 1981.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

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