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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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A scene from the Clifden Amateur Dramatic Society’s pantomime performance of Robin Hood held in the town’s parish hall on January 12, 1983.

1922

Sovereign rights

The right of opinion, especially in politics, is one conceded in all nations, but that right depends entirely on an unwritten code of honesty and honour that in forming his opinion every citizen makes use of honest intelligence and reason in guiding his judgement and is because a citizen is above lies and misrepresentation in matters affecting the national wellbeing and prosperity of his country.

On this date, January 15, 1922, every man in the West is (if not alien on Ireland’s soil or temporarily in residence) a Citizen of the Irish Free State, under the authority of the Provisional Government of Ireland. This Provisional Government consists of men chosen by the Irish people to represent them and by none others, and is to be in a few months replaced by one composed of those chosen by the Irish people.

Let us now, in endeavouring to point out certain dangers, bring home to the plain people the ordinary meanings of ordinary words.

Sovereign means supreme in power.

Supreme means highest and greatest.

Sovereign rights of the people mean the highest and greatest powers of the people. Now the highest powers are those born in, given to, inherited, owned by the people, to control fully the Government of the country, or in other words, Government of the people by the people.

These God-given rights of the people had been for ages denied the people not alone of Ireland, but of other countries, so the word republic came to signify these rights, and hence we turn up a dictionary printed and published in the U.S. and we read: “Republic – A nation or state governed by representatives elected by the citizens.”

Let me here point out that the Irish Free State now comes wholly and completely into that class, and no other, and that she has once again become, even unwelcomed by her own.

A thatcher at work on the roof of a house close to the Bishop’s Gate at Lower Salthill on March 4, 1966.

Restoring order

Now that the government of the country is passing into the hands of Irishmen, who will have control of all matters affecting the welfare of the old land, it is the duty of all classes and creeds to unite in their efforts to see that law and order will be efficiently enforced, and that there will not be any repetition of the recent looting of shops, which, owing to the frequency with which it occurred, could be regarded as nothing less than a scandal.

In conjunction with the R.I.C., the I.R. police of Galway have taken strong measures to cope with the “epidemic”, and in other ways are leaving noting undone to restore order.

In view of these circumstances, it is to be hoped that all right-meaning citizens and men of good-will, interested in the country’s welfare, will give every possible assistance in the preservation of order, which will reflect the fact that the nation is governed and controlled as a Christian community should be.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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Some of those confirmed at Kilmacduagh on May 6, 1970.

1922

Collins interview

Mr. Michael Collins told Mr. John Steele of the “Chicago Tribune” in an interview to which the romantic interest of the head of a new State attaches that he had just returned from the country where he had spent the week-end reading John Mitchell’s account of the American Revolution and the years following.

This might pass, he said, for a history of the present days in Ireland – “there are the same divisions, the same disorders, the same rebellious elements. America won thorough. So shall we.”

Following this optimistic note, the head of the Provisional Government told Mr. Steele that if Mr. de Valera and his followers refuse to cooperate to end the campaign of anarchy, then he is prepared to fight.

But it will not be civil war. It will be simply a police measure. “If this peace effort fails,” he is reported to have said, “then there will be no other. Every avenue of co-operation will have been explored, and we shall have to take strong action to restore order in the country. It is not an easy problem; for a revolutionary Government, in the nature of things, must take some account of motives. There is a lot of plain looting, robbery and violence going on.

“That is common criminality and must be punished. Also, there is a certain amount of commandeering from what, after all, is a patriotic, if misguided motive. That, too, must be stopped; but it requires a different method. Then there is the question of disarmament. There are too many guns in the country – uncontrolled guns, I mean – and they’ve got to be got in. a gun is a dangerous thing for a young man to have. Some day he may use it in a quarrel over a girl, or over a shilling, or over a word. That is one of the problems the revolutionary Government has got to solve, and is determined to solve, but it cannot be done in a day or two.”

He added that Irish people had the right to vote at an election, even if they voted wrongly.

Second bite of apple

The residence of Captain Gardiner, Lismanny, was raided by armed men on Saturday night and a Ford car taken.

It is stated that when visited some time ago, the car could not be taken away as it was out of order and the raiders had to content themselves by taking the wheels.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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County Galway dancers who won many trophies in competitions over two weeks in June 1967 pictured with their trophies in Eyre Square on June 26, 1967. From left: Breda Keedy, Ballinasloe, who won the shield for the single jig at Athlone Feis, Mary Kelly, Ballinasloe, who won the minor championship (under 11) at Athlone and the minor championship at Drumshambo Feis, Esther McGough, Tuam, who won the under 9 championship at Athlone and Rosemary Mannion, Gort who won the minor competition at Carrickedmund, Co Westmeath and the under 13 competition at Athlone.

1922

Raids and robberies

During the past week a regular epidemic of raids and robberies has taken place in and around East Galway, as a result of which considerable sums of money, jewellery, clothing etc. have been taken away from their owners.

In certain districts scarcely a residence has been immune from the midnight marauders who continue to pursue their nefarious deeds with unrelenting vigour, and in the present state of things, apparently, without fear of detection.

To the least observant, it is obvious that the parties who perpetrate these outrageous are a band who avail of the unsettled condition of affairs now existing, and all right-thinking persons, anxious for the restoration of normal conditions, will earnestly hope that peace will soon come to our distracted land so long torn by internal strife, and that there will soon be an end to crime which tends to disgrace a country once famous for its honour and chivalry.

Home raided

At two a.m. on Sunday morning the residence of Mr. John Cobban, a Presbyterian farmer living at Shanbally, about three English miles from Ballinasloe, was raided by a party of armed and disguised men who arrived in a motor car.

Entrance was affected by breaking a pane of glass in a window through which one of the party got in and opened the door for the others.

The raiders then searched the house, taking with them some jewellery, overcoats, £5 in cash, and a suit of clothes belonging to Mr. John Cobban, junr., and also his watch. Mr. Cobban is a Scotchman who has lived in the district for about fifty years.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

 

 

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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Brothers Tadhg and Mattie Ó Fatharta take a break for a cup of tea while gathering turf with their donkey Tony on Lochán Beag bog, Inverin, in October 1991. PHOTO BY JOE O'SHAUGHNESSY

1922

New houses at last

Galway is to have new houses at last! The forty-six ex-servicemen’s dwellings are to be erected at Fairhill. Mr. Patk. Dooley, the young Galway contractor, has been successful in securing the contract at, we understand, something like £550 per house against keen competition from Dublin, Cork, Limerick and other Galway contractors.

These houses will be built of concrete blocks, and the work of preparing these and the woodwork has already commenced. The employment which the work will give in Galway will be considerable, apart altogether from the important fact that the houses will provide healthy accommodation for a considerable number of people.

The contract is held from the Board of Works, which undertakes the scheme, and is prepared to build an additional twenty-two houses for ex-servicemen in Galway provided the land can be obtained, and to keep these houses in repair.

Galway has been fortunate in getting this scheme through despite some difficulties that arose. Indeed, few other towns in Ireland have been so fortunate. A considerable share of the credit is due to Mr. H. M. A. Murphy, the inspector under the housing scheme, and to Mr. M. J. Tighe, the Board of Works engineer who prepared the plans, and was instrumental in smoothing out a difficulty raised by the local authority in regard to sewage disposal.

Monies recovered

The sum of £87 odd, taken from the post offices at Ballygar, Caltra, and Castleblakeney was found on a man who was apprehended by I.R. police coming out from the Castleblakeney office.

He was placed under arrest, and on refusing to give his name or address, was detained. The money found on him corresponded with the missing sums taken from the offices and was given over by the I.R.P. to the Ballygar postmaster.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

 

 

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