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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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Two policemen walk the streets of Ahascragh around 1900.

1916

Infant mortality

It is a melancholy reflection that the death rate amongst infants in Galway bids fair this year to rank next to some of the highest in the statistics of the United Kingdom. Many, far too many, of these infants leave life’s fading space almost before they have found it.

It is not that Galway is an unhealthy city; its death-rate stands amongst the lowest of any town. Nor yet is this mortality brought about by noisesome slums, for, with very few exceptions, the poor of the city live in healthy surroundings.

The causes, we are informed by those who have made a study of the matter, are to be found in (1) incompetent early nursing, and the employment of ‘handy-women’ who ought to be held personally responsible; (2) parental ignorance and neglect; and (3) the fact that no society of ladies takes any real interest in this all-important subject.

If the latter condition were set to rights; if some of the lady social workers of Galway, and we have them in abundance, would but realise that their real domain lies in the underworld, and that their noblest ambition ought to be to succour the poor even at personal sacrifice, the evil of incompetent nursing, which if it does not bring death, may bring disease that accompanies the unfortunate victim through life, would quickly disappear.

Drunkards for life

At the meeting of the Diocesan Temperance Commission, the Lord Bishop of Galway, Dr. O’Dea, read a statement: “Parents or others who induce the young to break their Confirmation Pledge, by claiming the power to dispense on this Pledge, and giving children drink at Christmas or at social gathering, or as medicine, incur a very weighty responsibility before God.

“Such parents may easily be the cause of making their children drunkards for life. What a crime for a parent to commit so lightly against his own child.

“Deeply convinced as we are that poteen is a curse to the parishes in which it is made, we earnestly appeal to Catholic families in those parishes to have nothing to do with the making of it henceforth. Christ our lord gave up more for our sake. This sacrifice will be very pleasing to Him.”

1941

Damage to graves

Mr. B. Keane, Clerk to the Galway and Rahoon Cemeteries Committee, writes as follows: “Permit me space to request the general public to refrain from damaging the graves of people buried in both of the Corporation’s cemeteries.

“This damage usually occurs when large crowds attend funerals in the cemeteries. On these occasions, people attending think it quite proper to ‘stalk’ and rush over the graves of other people, thereby smashing wreaths and crosses.

“People who do this damage quite forget that the graves of the dead are entitled to Christian respect, and they also forget that many people go to a lot of expense to have the graves of their deceased relatives kept in proper order.

“Within the past few weeks, however, what seems to be the deliberate act of a maniac has occurred in Bohermore Cemetery. In this cemetery, wreaths have been deliberately smashed with stones, and the number of wreaths so smashed is large.

“This could not have happened through crowds attending funerals, and despite the careful watching of the caretaker, the wreaths, etc., continue to be smashed by some warped-minded person or persons.”

Water improving

The outlook in regard to the Galway water supply is brightening, but it is not yet considered advisable to sound the “all-clear”. In a letter to the Corporation, Dr. B. O’Beirne, County Medical Officer of health, stated that there was still anxiety among the residents of the city in regards to the condition of the water. He had some samples taken recently which were reported fit for use.

‘No’ to Summer Time

Mr. Boland, Minister for Justice, stated in the Dail to-day that it was not proposed to follow the British example by extending Summer Time in Éire. In Britain, Summer Time is being extended for a further hour from May 3rd to August 9th.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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A little girl celebrates Sarsfields’ success in the County Hurling Final in 1997.

1922

The ‘pay-nobodies’

The righteous wrath of members of Galway County Council very properly manifested itself against the “pay nobodies” at the meeting on Saturday last.

“I am quite satisfied,” declared Dr. Walsh, “that numbers of people who defend the policy of not paying rates are thoroughly dishonest.”

Mr. Kennedy said the policy to-day was to pay nobody and the people who were in debt themselves “wanted everybody else to be in the same position”.

Mr. Tierney invoked the dictum of the Irish Hierarchy in regard to the payment of just and lawful debts. Verily, “there are greater thieves than Cacus” – men who have such noble and patriotic notions that, to their mind, national freedom is synonymous with freedom from just and lawful obligations. It is time the people paid their rates and debts and gave up their outworn cant.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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Oil-covered swans being rescued for cleaning from the water at the Claddagh following an oil spill into the River Corrib in March 2001. A spillage upstream reached the Claddagh Basin and dozens of swans had to be removed to a sanctuary for safe keeping. About 20 swans were so contaminated that they either died or had to be put down.

1922

Temperance club

A long-felt want in Galway has been supplied this week by the opening on Monday night of the temperance club in the Columban Hall.

The club, which will be carried on under the committee of the Pioneer Association, is not confined exclusively to pioneers, but will be open to persons who have a pledge against the use of alcoholic drinks.

There will be an entrance fee of 2s. and a nominal payment for members of 6d. a month will be required to pay expenses. It is intended to provide games, etc., on the premises and in the near future to organise concerts, debates, conversazione, etc.

Rev. Father Stapleton, director of the Pioneer Association, is interesting himself in the club, and those who know the kindly soggarth aroon’s organising capacity have no doubt as to the future success of the club.

Those desirous of joining should call at the hall any night during the week between the hours of 7 and 10.30 p.m.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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Angela O'Keefe, Chairwoman of Music for Galway, pictured with a £16,000 Steinway grand piano just after it was delivered to University College Galway, ahead of its assembly in the Aula Maxima. Music for Galway fundraised to buy the piano which had to be transported from London after its purchase.

1922

Tackling drink

The International Congress on Prohibition sitting in Brussels reports that the liquor problem is substantially the same everywhere. In Ireland at present alcoholism has for us a tragic interest.

At no period in Irish history has there been so great a consumption of alcoholic liquors. Prohibition, even if it were practicable, would not solve the problem. America has taught us that lesson.

Scarcely a week passes that the American hospital registers do not record the death from alcoholic poisoning on a scale unprecedented before the country went “dry”.

The drink problem will never be successfully tackled in Ireland until such time as the public cooperate with the authorities in a rigid enforcement of the licensing laws and the drunkard is regarded as a pariah in a respectable community.

In this connection the announcement made at the last Galway parish court that persons found guilty of illicit distillation will be sent to jail without the option of a fine will be welcomed.

This is a step in the right direction and should act as a deterrent to people at present engaged in a traffic which is slowly poisoning the lives, in the moral as well as the physical sense, of large numbers of our people in outlying portions of the country.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

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