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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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A woman puts the finishing touches to a car at the Veteran and Vintage Car Rally in Salthill on May 4, 1969.

1921

Settlement prospects

The invitation which Mr. Lloyd George issued to Mr. de Valera on Sunday asking him to “attend a conference here in London, in company with Sir James Craig, to explore to the utmost the possibility of a settlement” opened up a new situation full with hopeful possibilities.

All the more so because the conditions laid down when the British Premier talked of a conference some time ago were absent. He asked Mr. de Valera to bring with him “any colleagues whom you may select,” and offered safe conduct to “all who may be chosen to participate in the conference.”

Sir James Craig, having consulted with his colleagues in the Six-County Cabinet, replied on Tuesday: “In view of the appeal conveyed to us by his Majesty in his gracious message on the opening of the Northern Ireland Parliament for peace throughout Ireland, we cannot refuse to accept your invitation to a conference to discuss how best this can be accomplished.”

And he named as his colleagues in the conference four of his five ministers, including Lord Londonderry, who declared last week that they should leave no stone unturned in bringing peace to the whole of Ireland.

On the same day Mr. de Valera wrote to the British Premier that he was “in consultation with such of the principal representatives of our nation as are available.”

He reciprocated the desire to bring about “a lasting peace between the peoples of these two islands,” and added that he saw no avenue by which this can be reached “if you deny Ireland’s essential unity and set aside the principal of national self-determination.”

Crash on the Bay

Whilst circling at a low altitude near H.M. destroyer Urchin in Galway Bay on Monday afternoon, an aeroplane from the Oranmore aerodrome crashed head foremost into nearly three fathoms of water, pinning Lieut. Fleming, the pilot, and Corpl. Bond, the observer, underneath.

The pilot, who was cut about the head and knees, managed to extricate himself and by Herculean efforts and he clambered his observer to the tail of the ‘plane, which had remained above water.

The observer, who was under water for a considerable time, had become unconscious, in spite of which fact the pilot had managed to climb to the tail of the machine, dragging him with him. A boat immediately put out from the destroyer, and took both men to the Naval base at the Harbour.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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A little girl celebrates Sarsfields’ success in the County Hurling Final in 1997.

1922

The ‘pay-nobodies’

The righteous wrath of members of Galway County Council very properly manifested itself against the “pay nobodies” at the meeting on Saturday last.

“I am quite satisfied,” declared Dr. Walsh, “that numbers of people who defend the policy of not paying rates are thoroughly dishonest.”

Mr. Kennedy said the policy to-day was to pay nobody and the people who were in debt themselves “wanted everybody else to be in the same position”.

Mr. Tierney invoked the dictum of the Irish Hierarchy in regard to the payment of just and lawful debts. Verily, “there are greater thieves than Cacus” – men who have such noble and patriotic notions that, to their mind, national freedom is synonymous with freedom from just and lawful obligations. It is time the people paid their rates and debts and gave up their outworn cant.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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Oil-covered swans being rescued for cleaning from the water at the Claddagh following an oil spill into the River Corrib in March 2001. A spillage upstream reached the Claddagh Basin and dozens of swans had to be removed to a sanctuary for safe keeping. About 20 swans were so contaminated that they either died or had to be put down.

1922

Temperance club

A long-felt want in Galway has been supplied this week by the opening on Monday night of the temperance club in the Columban Hall.

The club, which will be carried on under the committee of the Pioneer Association, is not confined exclusively to pioneers, but will be open to persons who have a pledge against the use of alcoholic drinks.

There will be an entrance fee of 2s. and a nominal payment for members of 6d. a month will be required to pay expenses. It is intended to provide games, etc., on the premises and in the near future to organise concerts, debates, conversazione, etc.

Rev. Father Stapleton, director of the Pioneer Association, is interesting himself in the club, and those who know the kindly soggarth aroon’s organising capacity have no doubt as to the future success of the club.

Those desirous of joining should call at the hall any night during the week between the hours of 7 and 10.30 p.m.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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Angela O'Keefe, Chairwoman of Music for Galway, pictured with a £16,000 Steinway grand piano just after it was delivered to University College Galway, ahead of its assembly in the Aula Maxima. Music for Galway fundraised to buy the piano which had to be transported from London after its purchase.

1922

Tackling drink

The International Congress on Prohibition sitting in Brussels reports that the liquor problem is substantially the same everywhere. In Ireland at present alcoholism has for us a tragic interest.

At no period in Irish history has there been so great a consumption of alcoholic liquors. Prohibition, even if it were practicable, would not solve the problem. America has taught us that lesson.

Scarcely a week passes that the American hospital registers do not record the death from alcoholic poisoning on a scale unprecedented before the country went “dry”.

The drink problem will never be successfully tackled in Ireland until such time as the public cooperate with the authorities in a rigid enforcement of the licensing laws and the drunkard is regarded as a pariah in a respectable community.

In this connection the announcement made at the last Galway parish court that persons found guilty of illicit distillation will be sent to jail without the option of a fine will be welcomed.

This is a step in the right direction and should act as a deterrent to people at present engaged in a traffic which is slowly poisoning the lives, in the moral as well as the physical sense, of large numbers of our people in outlying portions of the country.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

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