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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

Stephen Corrigan

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on

Joseph McNamara from Ganty, Craughwell, trained cattle to plough for the film 'Alfred the Great' in May 1968. Our photograph shows Joseph training cattle on the set at Kilchreest, assisted by Thomas Finnegan and John Burke, before filming started.

1921

Shooting incident

On Monday night, at about 8.30 p.m., an extraordinary shooting incident took place at Ballygaddy-road, Tuam, when a number of revolver shots were discharged from a passing motor car.

The footpath was crowded at the time with townspeople going for an evening walk as usual. The motor travelled at a reckless pace, and for a considerable distance the firing was carried on.

The people became terribly excited as bullets whizzed past and over them, and ladies screamed out in terror. It is stated that a bullet passed between the heads of two ladies walking together whilst several others had hairbreadth escapes.

One man got a slight wound in the hand, a bullet having cut through the skin. Several others threw themselves on the ground. The scene of the shooting is McHale Terrace, where a number of families live and children play about, and it is providential that lives were not lost.

Compensation claim

A compensation claim for £2,100 has been lodged by Messrs. T. A. Fahy and Son, drapers, Dunmore, for damages caused to the premises by a bomb allegedly thrown through the window and for a large quantity of drapery goods said to have been destroyed.

The claim sets out that two plate-glass windows were smashed, also shop door, staircase, ceiling, counter, etc., writing desk, large quantities of ladies’ and gents’ overcoats, tweeds, serges, blouses, caps, hats, shirts, underclothing, boots, shoes, quilts, shawls, gloves, collars, ties, flannelette, hosiery, dress goods, corduroy, jam, whiskey, linoleum, etc.

The police report states that it was alleged that bombs had been thrown into the premises, exploding inside the counter, and causing considerable damage.

Messrs. Fahy, Dunmore, were awarded £1,800 at Galway Quarter Sessions yesterday (Thursday).

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

Stephen Corrigan

Published

on

Galway Cathedral nearing the end of construction, before the knocking of the gaol walls in December 1964.

1921

Appeal to both sides

In an address to the electors of the six North-East counties the nationalist candidates say while it is their issued determination not to enter the North-East Ulster Parliament, they will labour outside with all their might to secure the unity of Ireland.

They point out the dangerous finance of the Partition Act and make an earnest appeal for elected representatives, North and South, to come together in a genuine constituent assembly and by mutual concession, fashion out a scheme to solve the Irish problem.

There is, they say, no thoughtful man – Nationalist or Sinn Féiner, Southern Unionist or Ulster Covenanter – who does not realise that the setting up of a legislative divorce between the six counties and the twenty-six is fraught with evil alike to the North-East corner and the rest of the country.

Ireland is a small country whose vital needs are largely identical, are closely co-related. No one knows better than the Unionist merchant of Belfast how intimately allied are the interests of the northern trader and his customers outside the six-county area.

The banking institutions of Belfast are vividly cognisant of the value of maintaining friendly relations between the agricultural and industrial portions of Ireland.

The country’s social and economic problems may differ in detail, but it is manifest they can only be properly dealt with by a Parliament representative of all the interests that are concerned.

The whole Partition Act is in its essence a fraud upon Ireland. Even before the “appointed day” its finance had already gone smash. Government propagandists had held out the glittering prospect of a surplus of over £7,000,000 to be divided between the North and South Parliaments after the appalling burden of an annual tribute of £18,000,000 and the cost of the reserved services as well as the cost of the new Parliaments’ own services had been deducted.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

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The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

Stephen Corrigan

Published

on

Crowds on Salthill Beach in the 1960s.

1921

Connemara shootout

From five a.m. till four p.m., when reinforcements arrived, a fierce battle raged on Saturday at Kilmilkin, five miles beyond Maam, Connemara, on the Leenane road. On the one side was a cycling patrol of fourteen policemen, pinned to the open road, and practically without cover except what some of them managed to secure by lying in a stream; on the other an unknown number of the I.R.A. concealed in prepared positions in the hills fourteen hundred feet above the police, and within three hundred yards’ rifle range of them.

Constable John Boylan, R.I.C., a native of County Leitrim, was shot dead a few hours after the fight opened. His last words to his companions were, “I’m hit. They have the range of the road. Do the best you can.” He leaves five little children, whose mother died a year ago.

Sergeant Hanley received two bullet wounds to the leg. In a dash for reinforcements on the running-board of a motor-car, Constable Ruttledge received a bullet wound in the arm fired from a range of about eight hundred yards.

The patrol left Oughterard at three a.m. in motor lorries. Near Leenane, they continued the journey on bicycles to escape observation. Their mission was to search the house of Mr. Pádraic O’Maille, M.P. for Connemara, where a flying column of the I.R.A. was believed, according to the official statement, to be in hiding.

Approaching the house about five a.m. they say smoke issuing from it, and a door open and close. They were dwelling in twos twenty yards apart. As they turned to the road to approach the dwelling, which is three hundred yards from the main highway, shots rang out.

The leading sergeant hurled himself off his bicycle, and took cover behind a tree-stump, and subsequently behind a small mound of turf. Men fled from O’Malley’s house and took up positions that had, it is said, been prepared on the hills at the back.

From here a steady fire was maintained for hours, the police reserving their ammunition and relying whenever their opportunity offered. At noon, Fr. Cunningham, the Catholic curate of Leenane, motored into the midst of the fight to succour the police. The official report alleges that he was fired upon while tending to the wounded. Our Connemara correspondent states that he was allowed to attend to the wounded sergeant. He remained under cover with the police until the end of the fight, and received the thanks of the Divisional Commissioner.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

Stephen Corrigan

Published

on

A section of Persse's Distillery captured in the early 1900s. The distillery, which operated throughout the second part of the 19th Century, was one of the city's biggest employers before it closed its doors in the early years of the 20th Century. It was one of Galway's most successful industries, producing around 400,000 gallons of whiskey per year in the 1880s.

1921

Losing hope

Since Mr. Lloyd George’s Coalition Government came to power in 1916, the state of Ireland has gone from bad to worse. Successive efforts towards peace were strangled at the outset. The most Rev. Dr. Clune, Archbishop of Perth, approached nearer to the establishment of a truce than any other intermediary.

Yet in the free atmosphere of Australia, his Grace is to-day constrained to confess that his efforts were thwarted by some power behind the English Prime Minister. Men who had long experience in politics, and of Mr. Lloyd George and his followers in particular, prophesises two years ago that “soon deputations would cease to go from Ireland to Westminster to plead a cause to those who did not want to hear.”

And so it has come to pass. Men of good-will abandoned hope. The continued talk of peace in Ireland probably arises from the will to peace, and has little foundation in fact. Recently, we were informed that a representative deputation had waited on His Eminence Cardinal Logue. Much significance was attached to this visit. We have seen no evidence that anything is likely to come of it.

In these circumstances, Mr. Lloyd George, in his three-column letter to the Bishop of Chelmsford and other Protestant leaders in Great Britain on Tuesday last, had an exceedingly bad case; for while the talked vaguely of peace, he offered only the sword.

“The Morning Post”, the new-found champion of the ex-Liberal, describes his letter as “an important State paper”. As such, it is a singularly sterile document that offers no hope for the future peace of Ireland.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

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