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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

Stephen Corrigan

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on

Relaxing in the sunshine at Eyre Square on July 20, 1982.

1921

Mail car robbery

The Carraroe mail-car was held up at Kingston, Galway, at 4.30 a.m. yesterday (Thursday), and £300 in old age pension money was taken. The mail-car leaves Galway daily at 4 a.m. and takes the coast route via Spiddal and Inverin to Carraroe.

The driver had only proceeded beyond the cross-roads on the top of Taylor’s Hill when he was approached by a masked man wearing a fawn coat, and carrying a revolver, who told him to leave the car as he wanted to search the mails.

The driver was called back in half-an-hour, and told to proceed on his journey, but he found that all the old age pension money which he carried was missing.

The driver was interviewed last evening upon his return from Carraroe. He is in the employment of Mr. Patrick Irwin, of Eyre-street, who holds the contract for the conveyance of mails.

The driver’s story bears out the version given above. He added that the raider was of middle height, wore a soft hat and a rain coat, and carried something in his hand that appeared to be a revolver.

He emerged from the high wall within a few hundred yards from Kingston gate, ordered the driver to halt, and throw the mail bags on the road, as he wanted to examine them.

The driver did so, and proceeded a short distance. After fifteen or twenty minutes he was ordered to return. When he did so, the raider disappeared.

The driver took the mail bags into the car and returned to Galway, where the robbery was reported. He then proceeded to Carraroe.

Tragedy of an emigrant

We regret to announce the death of Miss Maggie Feeney, of Cappa, Barna, which occurred from pneumonia on Long Island, on her way to the United States.

Miss Feeney, with a number of other emigrants from the Barna district, left Galway some weeks ago. On the way over she, with a number of others, contracted pneumonia.

They entered a hospital at Long Island, where Miss Feeney quickly succumbed. Fortunately, the others are now on the way to complete recover.

There is no more tragic chapter in the history of these days than the steadily-rising stream of emigrants.

A Queenstown correspondent notes that amongst the thousands who left that port during the past fortnight, the great bulk of the young emigrants came from the West.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

Stephen Corrigan

Published

on

Graham and Concepta Keane, both of Clarinbridge, as "Me and my Little Dutch Ladey". photo: Joe O'Shaughnessy

1921

Connemara shootout

Constable Pearson, R.I.C., Maam, Connemara, was shot through the right lung and liver during an ambush at Screebe at four o’clock on Wednesday afternoon.

He was one of a cycling party of six policemen who left Maam at one p.m. for the purpose of serving jurors’ notices and distributing old age pension money in the Rossmuck district.

On their return the sergeant and Constable Feeley were cycling in front, and the four other constables some distance behind. As they approached the little church at Screebe, shots rang out from the thicket.

The sergeant immediately rolled off his bicycle and rolled towards the ditch in the roadside for cover. He was followed immediately by Constable Feeley. Both policemen found themselves in the hands of the ambushers, who secured their revolvers and about twenty-five pounds in money which the sergeant carried.

Almost at the same moment, the four policemen who followed at a distance of 150 yards dismounted, and opened fire with their rifles. Shots were fired in return and Constable Pearson fell wounded.

The four policemen, including the wounded constable, made their way back to Screebe Lodge, nearby – where, it will be recalled, Lady Dudley was drowned last summer – taking with them their bicycles and arms.

The sergeant and Constable Feeley were later released uninjured. Constable Pearson was attended to by Dr. Kennedy O’Brien, Oughterard, and subsequently Surgeon Ml. O’Malley, Galway, was brought to the scene. He found that the bullet had gone right through the injured man’s lung and liver, and passed out at the back. He entertains hopes of recovery.

Reprisals

Following the ambush there was considerable activity of Crown Forces. Five houses in the district are reported to have been burned.

These include a house at the back of the thicket where the ambush took place, and the co-operative store at Camus, about a mile distant. An unconfirmed report states that the house in which Mr. Pádraic Pearse formerly resided at Turlough, and that of Mr. Conroy, National Teacher, have also been destroyed by fire. The district is barren and impoverished, consisting mostly of rocks and fishing lakes, and the thicket at Screebe is practically the only area of woodland in the neighbourhood.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

 

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

Stephen Corrigan

Published

on

Paying the 'eggs women' as they were referred to in the Connacht Tribune at the time, women are seen here queing up at the Galway Market on June 17, 1972.

1921

Back to bad old days

Emigration form Ireland to other lands during the present month has been considerably in excess of last month’s record was up to the level of the old bad years. So far, the emigration this year is three times that of last year.

The “Freeman” asserts that one district alone is reported this month to have sent one-third of the numbers that left the entire country during the month of February. Over 75,000 emigrants left Great Britain last year, but 15,000 left Ireland during the same period; so that with one-tenth of the population we sent abroad one fourth of the number.

Pride in the “greater Ireland beyond the seas” will not solace a wasted land for this terrible drain of its very life-blood. And we have the appalling fact that in the warfare now being waged 160 people were killed in Ireland during the present year, three months of which have not yet run.

During the past week alone thirty civilians and thirty-two members of the Crown Forces were reported killed in Ireland. The Archbishop of Tuam has demanded that the stronger Power should take the initiative in making an offer of peace – an offer that will stand some chance of being accepted and that would end this criminal wastage of an ancient nation.

Peace is out greatest need to-day. If English Statesmen are wise they will, in their own interest, recognise the fact before it is too late. The Archbishop, who has worked unceasingly for peace, has put forward a demand to which a magnanimous power that really desired to end the conditions in Ireland would respond without delay.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

Stephen Corrigan

Published

on

A woman collects her vegetables from the Market in Galway City in 1972.

1921

Clifden shooting

Constable Cornelius Reynolds was shot dead while on patrol duty in Clifden at ten p.m. on Wednesday night, and Constable Thomas Sweeney was seriously wounded. Subsequently, a young man named John J. MacDonnell was shot dead, as alleged, attempting to escape from the custody of Crown forces which were rushed to the district by special train.

Houses from which it was asserted shots were discharged at the police were set on fire and are still burning. The full story of the shooting has not yet been received, but it would appear that four members of the R.I.C. were on town duty as usual on Wednesday night.

Notwithstanding that feeling had been aroused by the execution of Thomas Whelan, there was no anticipation of any trouble, and the little town was as peaceable as usual.

At ten p.m. fire was suddenly opened on the town patrol. Constable Reynolds fell dead, and Constable Sweeney fell severely wounded. Constable Reynolds was thirty years of age and leaves a wife and family. He came to County Galway on transfer from Longford about a year-and-a-half ago, and had been in the City from Clifden two days ago on escort duty. He was a fine specimen of manhood, and was very popular amongst his comrades.

Immediately after the news of the fatal affray had reached Galway, a force of thirty constabulary was rushed to Clifden by a special train from Galway which left at 12.30 a.m. Dr. Sandys and Dr. O’ Malley were taken on the train to attend Const. Sweeney, whose life, it is thought, can be saved.

Military reinforcements, which travelled by road, arrived in Clifden before the police. It was in the early hours of this morning that the tragedy by which McDonnell lost his life took place. There was considerable activity of Crown forces throughout the district following the shooting, and early this morning houses from which the police allege they were fired at were found ablaze.

Following the shooting of Constable Reynolds and the wounding of Constable Sweeney at Clifden last night, panic reigned in the town and nine of the principal houses were burned. Mr. John J. McDonnell, whose dead body was found in an archway near the principal street in the early hours of this morning, was an ex-army man who had served as a sergeant-major during the war. He is described as a quiet, inoffensive young man.

The hotel owned by his father, Mr. Alex McDonnell, has been burned. It is thought that young MacDonnell may have come across the street during the burning to aid in putting out the fire when he was shot.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

 

 

 

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