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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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Flooding at the Spanish Arch in November, 1977.

1920

Kinvara invaded

On Sunday night Kinvara was invaded by a crowd from Kiltartan and Ardrahan returning from the Bellharbour sports who kicked up such a noise that the people were in fear and terror of their lives all night.

The crowd made a swoop on a Connemara hooker that was lying at the quay, and commanded the skipper, with a loud shout of: ‘Hands up,” to hand over a jar of poteen which he had in the boat.

On getting it they carried it off in triumph. After imbibing a bit too freely on the contents, a row arose over the division of the spoils and the jar was smashed into atoms.

The owner of the boat took a bicycle from the fellow who captured the poteen, and in throwing the machine into the boat, he missed the mark and it fell into the tide. The owner of the bike and his confreres cycled to Duras to intercept the boatman ‘homeward bound’ and after chartering a small boat they were informed that the bike had been thrown in the sea at Kinvara.

They returned to Kinvara and kept shouting and singing at intervals until seven or eight p.m. One of the two of the party took possession of a ladder and went on the roof of a thatched house, and with lighted candles threatened to set it on fire.

Another batch of them threw cars and everything they could lay hands on into the tide, and did a lot of damage, while broken bicycles were found on every road.

Meeting as Gaeilge

The first meeting of the members of Galway Rural District Council was marked by the most important and most unique step yet taken by any public board in Ireland – the decision to conduct the proceedings in the Irish language. This also applies to the Board of Guardians.

Practically all the members were present, for the most part young men; the old familiar faces were missing. Mr. Tom Ruane, Co. C., took the chair at the meeting of the District Council and introduced a deputation from the Gaelic League, consisting of the Rev. M. Griffin, C. C., Galway; Professor T. O’Maille, Galway, and Mr. Philip Waldron, organiser.

Fr. Griffin, speaking in Irish, as the chairman had done, dwelt at length on the objects of the Gaelic League in asking to have the proceedings at the meetings conducted in the National Language. He was followed by Professor O’Maille and Mr. Waldron.

After a little discussion (in Irish) it was unanimously decided that the proceedings at the meeting in future be in Irish, the chairman of the day to translate the decisions arrived at to the clerk for record on the minutes.

The remainder of the business of the meeting (which lasted for close on two hours) was then conducted in Irish.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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1922

Scabs warning

An exciting incident in connection with the postal strike occurred at Mary-st., Galway, at four o’clock last Saturday afternoon.

An official of the Galway Electric Lighting Company, Ltd., accompanied by another official, had gone to the central post office at Eglinton-street to collect the letters of the company. Shortly after he had left, it was alleged that he had taken other letters for delivery in Mary-street on his way back to the works.

The strike picket immediately gave chase, and an exciting scene, which was witnessed by a number of people in the street, followed.

The officials of the company were chased into the licensed premises of Mr. J. S. Young, but it could not be found that they had delivered any letters.

“We did not see them delivering any letters,” said one of the strikers. “Anyhow, an undertaking has been signed now not to attempt to deliver any to other people.”

A few national soldiers in uniform were standing at the Eglinton-street end of Mary-street during the incident. Four lady members of the staff at the Galway central office returned to work on Saturday and were understood to be engaged upon sorting of letters recently delivered by road.

It is stated that letters are also being posted at the central boxes. Meanwhile the picket remains almost continuously “on duty” outside the office, in front of which two boards have been place, one stating, “Don’t take letters from scabs”; and another “Restricted Services – Four do the work of forty-two”.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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Children examine the carcass of a 40-foot sperm whale, beached in Loughaunrone near Oranmore in September 1997. The whale was later burned on the beach as Council engineers were concerned about the danger of seepage if the giant mammal was buried.

1922

Connemara raids

The Publicity Department, Railway Hotel, Galway, issues the following: – Mr. Richard O’Toole, Lettermore, Connemara, has been forced to leave his home as a result of a raid made upon it by irregulars and subsequent threats.

A few nights ago, a party of men came to Mr. O’Toole’s home and demanded his motor bicycle. He refused to give it. The leader of the raiders, tapping his gun, said: “Do you see this?”

“Shoot away,” was Mr. O’Toole’s reply, and the raiders are then said to have gone to the garage to look for the machine. He managed, however, to get the machine, and to make his way to Galway. The men threatened that they would return to his house on the succeeding night and take him.

He was obliged to leave some men to mind his mother, who is very nervous, and falls into a faint when a raid takes place.

The house of Mr. Cloherty at Roundstone was also visited and about £40 worth of stuff taken. Mr. Cloherty is the father of Mr. J. J. Cloherty, a well-known County Councillor, and is a strong supporter of the Treaty.

A shop in Kilkerrin was also raided, and a considerable quantity of goods taken.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

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Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

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The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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Thatching one of the houses on Shantalla Road, just up from Cooke's Corner, in the 1970s.

1922

The third Dáil

The first meeting of the third Dáil held on Saturday morning last at Leinster House, Kildare-street, the premises of the Royal Dublin Society, recalled for a few minutes some of the stormy scenes at Westminster when Irish affairs were being discussed.

On Saturday, as then, Mr Laurence Ginnell was the central figure. He is apparently always cast for the role of obstructionist in politics, and on Saturday he made full use of his opportunity, with the result that, as at Westminster, he was carried form his seat by three stalwart attendants and expelled from the Assembly.

The Dáil met in the theatre of the house, a semi-circular room with seats rising tier upon tier from an open space in the centre. At the back of the last row of seats there is a promenade, and for some time before the Dáil was due to open, Mr. Ginnell, black band in hand and slouch, hat on head, marched round and round, speaking to no one, but apparently, like an arch conspirator, deep in thought.

Probably he felt lonely, for he was the only one of the anti-treaty members elected to the Dáil who put in an appearance. Miss MacSwiney and the rest, who were known to be in Dublin, have presumably decided to observe a policy of abstention.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

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