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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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The Salthill Holiday Princess parade passes by the Warwick Hotel on 6 September 1970.

1920

Lighten the burden

We have frequently stated that if Labour seriously tackled the question of reducing the cost of living, it could lighten the burden of the poor and the middle class considerably within a very few months.

Moreover, it would have entered upon a thoroughly sane and intelligible policy, by which it would earn the gratitude and support of every class in the community with the sole exception of the profiteers.

Recently an enormous accession of women voters have been added to the register. When this class proceeds to “pull its weight,” it will be seen that it will be all in favour of those who can reduce the costs and anxieties of running the home, and leave a reasonable margin out of the wage or salary earner’s purse to provide the ordinary amenities of life.

At present, the costs of living do not merely keep pace with ever-increasing wages: they constantly outpace wages. In the result thousands of housewives have gone through a period of anxiety which, to those who know little of home worries and a slender purse, are scarcely credible.

Labour has recently shown what it can do in this matter; and however we may criticise the somewhat crude methods employed in certain instances, we cannot fail to appreciate the potentialities of the movement to reduce the cost of living to a reasonable level in Ireland.

It is true that the National Executive of the Irish Farmers’ Union has denied “the right of any section of the community to assume the function of government,” but it is equally true that whilst bacon and butter were being shipped to England, they could not be purchased in the country where they are produced, except at famine prices that placed them out of the reach of any but the most wealthy.

As a result of the conferences forced by the attitude of Labour in placing an embargo on imports, thirty per cent of the bacon already on hands is to be ear-marked for Irish consumption, and for the future the shippers of live pigs are warned that if the proportion of the 17 ½  per cent. permitted to be exported is exceeded, they run the risk that the embargo on live pigs will be re-imposed.                                                                             

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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A little girl celebrates Sarsfields’ success in the County Hurling Final in 1997.

1922

The ‘pay-nobodies’

The righteous wrath of members of Galway County Council very properly manifested itself against the “pay nobodies” at the meeting on Saturday last.

“I am quite satisfied,” declared Dr. Walsh, “that numbers of people who defend the policy of not paying rates are thoroughly dishonest.”

Mr. Kennedy said the policy to-day was to pay nobody and the people who were in debt themselves “wanted everybody else to be in the same position”.

Mr. Tierney invoked the dictum of the Irish Hierarchy in regard to the payment of just and lawful debts. Verily, “there are greater thieves than Cacus” – men who have such noble and patriotic notions that, to their mind, national freedom is synonymous with freedom from just and lawful obligations. It is time the people paid their rates and debts and gave up their outworn cant.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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Oil-covered swans being rescued for cleaning from the water at the Claddagh following an oil spill into the River Corrib in March 2001. A spillage upstream reached the Claddagh Basin and dozens of swans had to be removed to a sanctuary for safe keeping. About 20 swans were so contaminated that they either died or had to be put down.

1922

Temperance club

A long-felt want in Galway has been supplied this week by the opening on Monday night of the temperance club in the Columban Hall.

The club, which will be carried on under the committee of the Pioneer Association, is not confined exclusively to pioneers, but will be open to persons who have a pledge against the use of alcoholic drinks.

There will be an entrance fee of 2s. and a nominal payment for members of 6d. a month will be required to pay expenses. It is intended to provide games, etc., on the premises and in the near future to organise concerts, debates, conversazione, etc.

Rev. Father Stapleton, director of the Pioneer Association, is interesting himself in the club, and those who know the kindly soggarth aroon’s organising capacity have no doubt as to the future success of the club.

Those desirous of joining should call at the hall any night during the week between the hours of 7 and 10.30 p.m.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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Angela O'Keefe, Chairwoman of Music for Galway, pictured with a £16,000 Steinway grand piano just after it was delivered to University College Galway, ahead of its assembly in the Aula Maxima. Music for Galway fundraised to buy the piano which had to be transported from London after its purchase.

1922

Tackling drink

The International Congress on Prohibition sitting in Brussels reports that the liquor problem is substantially the same everywhere. In Ireland at present alcoholism has for us a tragic interest.

At no period in Irish history has there been so great a consumption of alcoholic liquors. Prohibition, even if it were practicable, would not solve the problem. America has taught us that lesson.

Scarcely a week passes that the American hospital registers do not record the death from alcoholic poisoning on a scale unprecedented before the country went “dry”.

The drink problem will never be successfully tackled in Ireland until such time as the public cooperate with the authorities in a rigid enforcement of the licensing laws and the drunkard is regarded as a pariah in a respectable community.

In this connection the announcement made at the last Galway parish court that persons found guilty of illicit distillation will be sent to jail without the option of a fine will be welcomed.

This is a step in the right direction and should act as a deterrent to people at present engaged in a traffic which is slowly poisoning the lives, in the moral as well as the physical sense, of large numbers of our people in outlying portions of the country.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

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