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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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Seventies-style and sophistication on show at the Autumn Fashion Show in Leisureland in September 1975.

1919

Disgraceful conditions

A report was forwarded through the Local Government Board, from Mr. Pack Beresford, on the condition of the labourers’ houses in Aughrim.

It showed they were in a most disgraceful way, without any sanitary accommodation and little better than hovels.

Fr Coughlan in a letter to the Local Government Board drew attention to the unsanitary, unchristian and savage conditions under which the poor labourers of Aughrim had to live.

As it was Fr. Dan Coughlan brought the matter up first, the Council returned their thanks to him, and it was decided to take steps to have proper houses built.

Economic danger

The country is at present passing through a period in its economic history which is full of dangers. There is a sinister tinge of irony in the reflection that a war, that has brought sorrow and devastation on many peoples and many lands, has brought wealth and prosperity to other people and other lands.

In a small measure, relatively speaking, the Irish farmer has been able to share in that prosperity. The demand for increased food production and his own efforts and industry have succeeded, during these terrible years, in finding bread and work for himself and his children.

In the result, both have lived in comparative comfort. To-day, America is seeking out immigrants who shall be good citizens and capable workers. The State Emigration Department of Washington is looking towards Ireland.

It does not want anarchists of revolutionaries from southern Europe. And of all the heterogeneous company that crowds into the States, the Irish emigrants make the best and most reliable citizens.

The difficulties of securing passports are rapidly disappearing. The day is drawing nearer when our young men and women, if they are not given a decent incentive to secure bread at home, will pour forth in thousands to the land where ten million Irish have found a home.

Water complaints

Complaints from all sides as to the City’s water supply were heard at the meeting of the Galway Urban Council yesterday (Mr. J. S. Young presiding).

First there was a letter from the Dominican Convent, Taylor’s Hill, about the insufficiency of the supply to the Convent.

The Town Steward (Mr. Molloy) said the tank in the convent was filled every night, but that it was wasted very soon. There were 200 people in the place.

Mr. Cooke thought it was a great surprise that after spending so much money on their new waterworks’ system that there should be a shortage. – “It is extraordinary,” agreed the Chairman.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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Some of the cast at the St Jarlath’s College production of ‘The White Horse Inn’ on December 18, 1968.

1921

Visit cancelled

Considerable disappointment was caused at Loughrea on Friday when Mr. de Valera’s inability to visit the town that day and remain overnight with His Lordship, Most Rev. Dr. O’Doherty, Bishop of Clonfert, as arranged, became known.

An urgent message, stated to be in connection with the present peace negotiations, while engaged in inspecting I.R.A. units in Clare, necessitated his prompt return to Dublin, whither he was accompanied by Mr. Cathal Brugha, Minister of Defence.

His tour in South-East Galway was to consist of an inspection of first, second and third battalions of the South-East Galway I.R.A. Brigade at Kilricle on Saturday, and on the fourth and fifth battalions of the same Brigade at Greendoor, Portumna, afterwards.

Equally keen was the disappointment created at Ballinasloe where elaborate preparations were made for the reception of the distinguished visitor.

A meeting of representatives of public bodies in the Town Hall, Ballinasloe, on Saturday night, to be addressed by the President, was necessarily cancelled, as well as the proposed reception and illuminations in Loughrea on the previous night.

The business on Saturday conducted by Mr. R. J. Mulcahy, I.R.A. Chief of Staff, was confined to purely military affairs.

The review at Kilricle on Saturday was a most impressive one. Composed of the first, second and third battalions of the South-East Galway Brigade, I.R.A., the parade was witnessed by a large crowd. In the parade were between twenty and thirty members of the Ballinasloe Cumann na mBan and forty of the Ballinasloe Fianna Éireann.

The latter, many of whom dressed in full uniform, presented a smart appearance and were the object of much admiration.

Oranmore fracas

A disquieting story comes from Oranmore of an incident which is alleged to have taken place between the I.R.A. and Black and Tans on Tuesday night.

On the part of the police, it is alleged that they were challenged by the I.R.A., and when one of the police pulled out a cigarette case the latter withdrew some distance and fired a shot.

On the other hand, it is alleged that the Black and Tans demanded drink at Costelloe’s public house free of charge, which was refused, and it is also stated that they used ugly expressions. The matter is being investigated by the liaison and police officers.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

 

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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A competitor in the high jump at Shantalla Sports on July 25, 1971.

1921

Treaty perspective

This morning’s development in connection with the Irish Peace Treaty should be viewed in its proper perspective. Whilst Mr. de Valera has thought well to repudiate, in effect – for that is what his statement means – the agreement come to by his colleagues with the British Peace Plenipotentiaries, he says that “there is a definite constitutional way for resolving our potential differences”.

It is, to say the least, unfortunate that the five men who were given the plenary powers to negotiate on September 14 last, who worked patiently towards a settlement for weeks, who had the confidence of the whole nation, should have to face a new fight for peace on their return.

There can, of course, be little doubt as to the outcome of that fight, but we fear, as this morning’s “Independent” points out, that the crisis is likely to strengthen the position of the partitionists of the North East corner.

If the Dáil makes a decision in favour of Peace on a Wednesday, no one will question that decision; and it would be far better that this should happen than that there should be an appeal to Caesar at this critical period.

In all Anglo-Irish history there has been no such week as this. Following a period when hope swung back to the borderland of despair came the dramatic news that a Treaty of Peace between Great Britain and Ireland had been signed.

The news seemed too good to be true. It was almost unbelievable that a quarrel of seven hundred and fifty years had been solved in a night; that while people slept there had been established in a quiet street off Whitehall a Treaty whereby the shackles were struck from Ireland, and this ancient nation was left free to pursue her own destiny.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

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The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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Molly Browne singing 'Here's a toast to you Claddagh at the foot of Fairhill' at the opening of Claddagh Festival on August 1, 1976.

1921

Tackling food prices
We trust that there will be a good attendance and a united effort to get an efficient committee at the Anti-Profiteering Committee’s preliminary meeting at the Town Hall at 7.30 p.m. on Tuesday. A real effort should be made to secure that people of independent standing, whose courage in the public interest can be relied on, are put on the committee.
What is wanted more than anything else is a little grit, and our criticisms, we are glad to note, have already gone far to encourage this. We welcome Dr. Walsh’s reference, even though belated, to the price charged for essential foodstuffs, such as bread and milk, in Galway.
But what of gas at 10s. 10d.? Wicklow has decided that 7s. 6d. is an ample price to pay, and Wicklow has refused to accept anything but Irish arbitration on the price.
In consequence, Wicklow town has buckled its armour and reversed the usual order of things by cutting off the gas company and is resorting to other means of lighting and heating. And it has been found that wonders can now be achieved on paraffin oil!
Mr. Fallon, of Abbeygate-street, advises in our columns today meat at from 9d. to 1s. per lb., and in consequence Mr. Fallon can rely upon crowds of customers, whilst those of his colleagues, who refuse to face facts, can stand with folded arms and unclaimed carcases.
Messrs. Commins and Greany are selling an ordinary twig at 1s. 6d., which it cost 5s. 6d. to purchase a few months ago. Above all, the new profiteering committee should watch the public market, ensuring that local people should have the food in preference to the exporter.

1946

Light agenda
The Oughterard Development Association has invited the three West Galway T.D.s to a conference on Sunday next to discuss ways and means of redressing local grievances. The main items on the agenda are the question of providing a modern sewerage system and the proposed extension of E.S.B. current to the town.
It is understood that the plans for the sewerage system are now in their final stage and only awaiting the sanction of the Department. The T.D.s will be asked to see that sanction be forthcoming as speedily as possible.
The people argue that if unlimited financial resources can be made available to open up new tourist centres in out-of-the-way places, some consideration should be given to the claims of long-established centres like Oughterard.

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