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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

Stephen Corrigan

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A group of youngsters at the Kinvara Sports Day in 1970.

1919

Tuam en fête

Tuam was en fete on Thursday and Friday nights when the majority of the people turned out to receive Messrs. M. Dwyer, T.C., Chairman, Tuam Guardians, and Mr. M. J. Hoey (who had been released from Derry jail). Elaborate preparations were made from Mr. Hoey’s reception and the town was one mass of illumination.

At the meeting in the Town Hall on Friday night, Mr. G. Guy, solr., said: We had the great pleasure a couple of nights ago of welcoming back an old patriot, Michael Dwyer (applause), but to-night is if anything a still more pleasing occasion because it is in the nature of a surprise.

Mr. Hoey has been released several months before his time. He has not been released through any clemency or kindness on the part of the Government, I needn’t telly you (applause). He has been released as the result of a hunger strike (applause) and simply because they were afraid he might die in their hands like Tom Ashe died (applause).

During the years Mr. Hoey was here in Tuam he was always known to be a respectable, well-conducted Irishman, but he committed the “crime” of taking an active interest in his country (applause).

For that “crime” he was sent to jail for twelve months, and not only was he sent to jail for twelve months but he got twelve months’ hard labour like any common scoundrel or rogue.

Mechanics’ strike

From an obscure quarrel between men and master, in which two motor mechanics, one motor driver and one cycle mechanic were involved, the dispute at Messrs. Bailey’s Motor and Cycle Works, Eyre-square, Galway, has been forced under public notice this week by a liberal display of placards on dead walls and even outgoing vans and lorries, and by a guard of pickets comprising of the disgruntled employees which marches to and fro opposite the shop and garage.

The placards, which are prominently displayed on the breasts of the pickets announce, “We demand a living wage” and “Strike still on at Bailey’s Motor and Cycle Works, Eyre-square, Galway.”

The increased activity on the part of the men was heralded by the visit to Galway of Mr. Liam Slattery, the Organiser of the Irish Automobile Drivers’ and Mechanics’ Union, who declared at Tuam on Thursday, as reported on Page 7, that the conditions under which motor men in that town worked were “enough to make anarchists, let alone trades unionists of them.”

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

Stephen Corrigan

Published

on

The Galway Wanderers RFC team who were defeated by Athlone in the Connacht Juvenile seven-a-side league in September 1969. Front row (from left): Patrick Badgers, Patrick Flaherty, Martin Lally and Larry Holland. Standing (from left): Alan Glynn (trainer), Kieran Cloherty, Thomas Moran and John Cubbard.

1920

Council cottages

Mr. A. Staunton, Chairman, presided at the weekly meeting of the Ballinasloe Urban Council held on Tuesday evening. There were also present: Messrs. MI. Ryan, W. Griffin, T. McDonnell, P. Dolan, J. Donnelan, F. Clayton, Dr. Rutherford.  The Local Government Board wrote approving the sites for the erection of 250 cottages in Ballinasloe Urban District. They are located at Brackernagh, Poolboy and Creagh, while the selection in the town is not approved.

Mr. Griffin: What is the next step? –Chairman: I think the sites’ committee appointed should see the sites and report to the next meeting. –To acquire sites by agreement, the surveyor said, was the next step and the plans would be prepared to suit the sites, he told Mr. Griffin

Answering, Mr. Ryan, the Surveyor said no area was approved where people were at present living. The sites on the right hand side of the Square were not approved and the existing houses should be dealt with under the Public Health Act.

Mr. Connolly said houses there were purchased by the Munster and Leinster Bank, but this would not mean the eviction of any one, the Surveyor said.

If people had nowhere to go, Mr. Ryan said, their disturbance would not be tolerated. –Chairman: What do you suggest to do, gentleman? –Mr. Ryan: Acquire the sites where there is no one living.

The Surveyor said they would get sites by agreement for eighteen houses in Brackernagh, and Mr. Connolly said a start could be made there. –Mr. McDonnell: Is this going to be a profitable work to the Council? –Mr. Ryan said the houses must be got. –Dr. Rutherford: What will they cost? –Clerk: £600 per cottage.

1945

Repair works

Despite the lot of work which had been done in the past couple of years many Corporation cottages were still in an appalling condition, Mr. C. I. O’Flynn, Co. Manager, told Galway Corporation on Thursday. Mr. J. S. Carroll, Borough Surveyor, he added, had estimated that it would cost £8,000 to put them all in proper repair, and the question was, would they adopt a piecemeal policy or get sanction for a loan to repair them altogether.

The matter arose when the Borough Surveyor asked for a supplementary estimate of £400 for cottage repairs. The Borough Surveyor told the meeting that if he was to spend sums on repairs over the next five years there would be constant complaints.

With about £8,000 he could clear up all the repair works within a year and start with a clean sheet. He referred to the unfenced houses at the Claddagh.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

Stephen Corrigan

Published

on

Pupils of the Mercy Convent Secondary School in Galway City at the opening of a £150,000 new residential wing attached to the school.

1920

Commotion at meeting

Wild scenes of commotion marked the annual meeting of the County Galway National Teachers’ Association which was held in the Town Hall, Galway, on Saturday.

The noise began when Mr. P. O’Cleary, Kilcolgan, said the members of the C.E.C. were “exactly like Judas who betrayed Our Lord,” in reference to their action on the Education Bill. There were loud cries of “Withdraw,” and amid much confusion, Mr. O’Cleary would not be allowed to continue his address which was mainly directed towards a criticism of the opening speech of the Chairman (Mr. M. Curley) who quoted the words of the Bishop of Raphoe describing the C.E.C. as “gentlemen as respectable as are to be found in Ireland.”

Mr. O’Cleary asked leave to be allowed to explain his remark but his was refused, and Mr. Power proposed and Mr. J. Heffernan seconded that he be expelled from the Association. An amendment by Mr. Parker, seconded by Mr. McClew, that Mr. O’Cleary be asked to withdraw from the meeting was passed.

Hospital in peril

On the financial year ending March 31, there will be a balance against the Galway County Hospital Committee of £4,000. The institution of which the sick poor of the county and the University clinical school depend is in perilous plight.

Saturday’s meeting seriously discussed closing its down, at least for a time. Dr. Clinch, Local Government Board Medical Inspector, asseverated that any expedients that might be employed to restore its solvency would but delay “the evil day.”

Fortunately, there are two men on the committee who combine optimism with unfailing grit and pertinacity. If the County Hospital remains, if the capacity for local administration is not to be brought to utter discredit, the tangle must be unwound: the men who have not grudged time, energy or perseverance in the exasperating task are Mr. Michael McNeil, the Chairman of the Committee, and Mr. Thomas C. McDonogh, one of its most attentive members.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

Stephen Corrigan

Published

on

A group pictured at the first dinner dance at Calvary Hospital (now the Bon Secours) in Renmore in January 1967.

1920

Compensation claims

The “Freeman” of Monday had a biting comment on the Act passed last year enabling the Government servants in Ireland who receive injuries in the carrying out of their duties, or the dependants of those who suffer death to acquire liberal compensation of the ratepayers.

It says: “On Friday last a police sergeant was awarded by the Recorder of Galway £1,200 compensation for the loss of an eye, the damage being incurred whilst endeavouring to arrest a lunatic who, says the terse report, ‘held the police at bay with a shotgun and ultimately perished in the flames of his own cottage.’

Presumably the sergeant was merely performing the duty for which he has been paid since he joined the Force of preserving the law, when he endeavoured to secure the safe custody of the unfortunate madman. It is fairly safe to assume that he knew since before he entered the Depot that such duty was expected of him in return for his stipend and that its efficient discharge involved the risk of injury.

Yet no sooner does the risk materialise than the same and unoffending ratepayers of a whole district are ordered to pay the damage wrought by a lunatic, as if his aberration of intellect and lapse from normal behaviour could be imputed to them as a crime! Could anything be more preposterous?

Why, the wretched man who perished in the flames of his burning cabin cannot be deemed a greater lunatic than the legislator or the administrator who would argue such a freak law is equitable.

Closure rumours

A persistent rumour gained circulation in Galway this week that the County Hospital will be closed. This, should it take place, would be due to the financial straits in which the Committee of Management find themselves. From inquiries made, no confirmation of the report can be obtained, but if money is not forthcoming there is no doubt that the institution cannot carry on.

A special meeting of the Committee will be held on Saturday, 14th inst., to consider the situation. A motion is on the agenda to request the Unions to pay the first half of the 1920 assessment immediately, and to ask the County Council to forward this amount to the Unions for payment.

There is a sum of £2,550 due to contractors, and the Bank, which has already given an overdraft of £1,000, will not advance any more money.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app

The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

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