Classifieds Advertise Archive Subscriptions Family Announcements Photos Digital Editions/Apps
Connect with us

Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

Avatar

Published

on

1919

Hospital rations

At Saturday’s meeting of the Loughrea Board of Guardians, Mr. P. Cahill presiding, a letter was received from the hospital helpers drawing the attention of the Board to the fact that in the new scale of dietary fixed for them there were no potatoes allowed, and there had been no provision made for dinner on Friday.

They asked that an egg each be allowed for breakfast daily, and that 1 lb. of bacon in lieu of the same amount of beef, and half-1 lb. butter in lieu of margarine be allowed weekly. The board granted the application subject to the sanction of the Local Government Board.

Mrs. M. J. Killeen, matron, wrote: “Gentlemen, – I beg to remind you that about two months ago when my rations were about to be changed I asked you to leave them as they were, and your board unanimously agreed to do so. Now the Local Government Board want to cut them down by 3s. per week, which I will not on any account agree to.

There is not a matron of any workhouse in Ireland in the matter of having her bit of food bandied about and talked of treated as I am. When the curtailing of food was first agreed to during the war it was a different thing, but now that the war is over I cannot understand why my rations are being cut down, and I will go on hunger strike before I accept the change. This is final, but I wish to state that I do not blame the members of your Board, as, with a few exceptions, they have been invariably very kind to me.”

Galway Ford dealer

Mr. W. P. Higgins, of Galway and Athenry, has, as the advertisement we print this week indicates, been appointed Ford dealer for Galway city and county, so that anyone requiring early delivery of a Ford car should get into touch with him without delay.

Mr. Higgins informs us that over £1,000 worth of Ford spare parts will be stocked in his Galway garage.

Nursing fund

As a result of an auction of goods remaining over at Sandymount after the departure of the Belgian refugees from Galway, Ms. M. Burton Persse has forwarded £13 each to Nurse Young, of the Jubilee Nursing Association in Galway, and Nurse Campbell, of the Association for the Nursing of the sick poor in their own homes.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app

The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City  and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

Avatar

Published

on

Work underway building St Pat's Boxing Club in Bohermore in June, 1971.

1919

Shipbuilding in Galway

A well-known London syndicate of shipbuilders which has recently established the industry on a considerable scale in Swansea, is anxious to secure a site for a shipbuilding yard on the west Coast of Ireland.

The name of Galway has been mentioned and we are led to understand that the Company would come to Galway if it was given an encouragement to do so.

Should Galway Harbour Board express the readiness to provide facilities and afford a site, negotiations will immediately be opened, and should those be successful, the work of erecting a yard would be begun almost at once.

Showing at The Victoria

There will be no lack of attractions at the premier picture house next week. It is a good while back since there was a “visit” from Queenie Thomas. No daintier and cleverer film actress ever stood before the camera, and she will take the chief role in a superb picture, entitled, “It’s Happiness that Counts,” on Sunday night.

The “Circus King,” such a favourite with those fond of thrills, will finish up on Monday and Tuesday nights, when its last episode will be screened.

On those nights, too, will open a great new serial, “The Silent Mystery.” It will be well worth seeing the first episode to learn of its enthralling plot.

Arms raid

Between eight and nine o’clock on Sunday night a raid for arms took place at the house of Lieut-Colonel Bernard, Castlehackett, near Tuam.  A party of nine or ten masked men entered, went to the butler and demanded to be shown where the guns were, and threatened him.

He gave them a shotgun. They also went to the gardener, Jackson, and made a similar demand, and were supplied by him with another gun.  The raiders took away about thirty rounds of ammunition, and it is said that they came across money which they did not take, saying it was guns they wanted, and adding that they would return them safely when they got their own back.

Lieut-Colonel Bernard is in England at present. The police are diligently pursuing inquiries into the matter, but so far no arrests have been made.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app

The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Continue Reading

Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

Avatar

Published

on

John and Paul Colleran were winners in the Most Original section of the Galway Swimming Club Fancy Dress competition in January 1965.

1919

Lady candidates

Already the shadow of dissolution is upon them. Shrewd strategists are busy delivering election addresses to the reporters, so that they may pass on to office in the new body corporate.

But they will have to pass through the sieve of Proportional Representation; and the returning officers who were instructed on the new system at the Town Hall on Wednesday to declare it to be a Chinese puzzle.

This is not a hopeful beginning. As one optimistic returning officer put it, “We shall muddle through, and elect the new boards anyhow”. It is due to those who planned P.R. to say that it is not an “anyhow” method, but one which aims at securing representation for every section of the electorate.

In Sligo that result was admirably achieved; in Sligo they had the advantage of the P.R. officials, and these gentlemen in the coming contests must perforce delegate their duties to others.

“But these duties are simplicity itself,” they say. “Wait and see,” avers to our lectured returning officers. At any rate, the coming elections will provide a much bigger test in the great experiment than did Sligo. And already P.R. has given courage to new forces who have hitherto been practically unrepresented in Irish local government.

At least four lady candidates are spoken of. Certainly no body that has to do with the health and welfare of the community could be considered complete without women. Who knows better than the mother the trials and tribulations of the poor, and the need for decent conditions in the community?

Irish question interest

The Irish-American Press is once more freely entering this country. It reveals beyond a doubt that the Irish question to-day bulks large in American politics, and that Irish nationalism, as given expression to at the last general election, possesses a powerful and unsleeping organisation in the United States.

Smug English politicians who talk about “settling Ireland,” as if the fate and fortune of a nation were a mere matter of exchange and barter, might peruse the pages of some of the champions of Irish nationality published in the States with considerable profit.

Untrammelled by D.O.R.A., fearless of suppression, their writers speak with a candour that does not mince matters. Ireland is described as “a nation bound and gagged,” and Mr. Lloyd George as a “quack” who is merely fooling Ireland.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app

The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Continue Reading

Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

Avatar

Published

on

Gay Byrne, who died this week, pictured with his wife Kathleen Watkins and daughter Crona at the Oyster Festival in 1966.

1919

Notes for farmers

Close students of the agricultural press, and of similar publications of countries which are Ireland’s competitors in the agricultural produce markets, cannot fail to have been impressed by the intense interest that is being displayed in these countries in every method which will assist in obtaining better results from farming.

The dominating impression is one of thirst for knowledge, keenness, and co-operation with all agencies working for improved methods, and is an indication of the competition that may be expected when present trade hindrances are removed.

Irish farmers, however, have already at their disposal systems of scientific instruction, 2nd investigation, as well as tested results, and need have no fear of the result of such competition, if they will only utilise the means provided, and co-operate in a spirit similar to that animating the farmers of other countries by adopting the methods which have been commended to them, and applying the lessons taught by the scientific experiments conducted during the past 20 years.

Senseless act

Two large plate-glass windows in the premises of the Co-operative Store at Forster-st, Galway, were smashed at 4.30 a.m. on Wednesday morning. Those living in the vicinity heard the crash at that hour. The perpetrators of this senseless and unprovoked outrage did not go far to seek for the weapons they made use of.

The planks of the scaffolding that was used in connection with the repairs to the building were at hand, and it was these they used in breaking the windows. A large lamp, which was hanging inside one of the windows, was also smashed.

The act has aroused universal condemnation in the town.

At the meeting of the Urban Council yesterday (Thursday), Mr. Rabbitt proposed a motion condemning the outrage. – Chairman: It is a shame. But that is the way they are going to make a great country of this – smashing windows and committing outrages. It is a grand thing.

Mr Rabbitt: It gives the town a bad name and it is no good to anyone.

Chairman: It is a shame, and a cowardly thing to do, and nobody would do it but a blackguard.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app

The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

Continue Reading

Local Ads

Advertisement

Weather

Weather Icon
Advertisement

Facebook

Advertisement

Trending