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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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1919

Scandalous profiteering

Loughrea Town Commissioners had an illuminating discussion at last meeting on the prices of coal and butter in county towns.

A letter was received from the Fuel Controller stating that it was the duty of the board as local authority to consult the local merchants, and get from them particulars of the sources of their supplies and the expenses which go to make up their prices in order to arrive at reasonable figures.

They should therefore ascertain from what port the district was supplied, and if from Dublin the prices should be fixed.

Shot on eve of wedding

A respectable farmer named Peter Fahy, Caherkilleen, Athenry, was fired at by some unknown party and wounded on the legs on returning to his home on Monday night.

Mr Fahy, who was to have been married on the following day, spent the evening at the residence of his fiancée, who resides near Loughrea. On inquiries it was ascertained that his injuries are not serious.

His marriage took place on Wednesday.

Bidding farewell

Miss May Dowie, who is attached to Lady Dudley’s nursing staff and has been stationed at Recess for some years, was the recipient of a dressing case and solid silver mirror from the people and also from the staff of the Midland Railway Hotel, on the occasion of her transfer to Roundstone.

Clifden Marathon

A correspondent writes: On Saturday (Peace Day) a four-mile race came off at the Marconi Station over a cinder path encircling the station.

The competitors were Lt. Ainsworth, officer in charge of the military at the Marconi Staion, and Mr. T. Keane, Engineering Department, Marconi Station, for a stake of £5 a side.

There was some brisk betting, commencing at 5 to 1 on Lt. Ainsworth in small money. At flag fall, the confidence of the military in their champion oozed out like Bob Acro’s valour.

Evens were the best terms that could be got by the followers of Mr. Keane. In the first two miles it looked like either man’s win. In the third mile Keane drew away from his man.

In the rest of the race Keane had everything his own way and won as he pleased by a furlong.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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Published

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1919

Child deserted

A male child was found deserted outside the Galway workhouse gate on Tuesday morning by a contractor who was taking milk to the workhouse hospital.

The child, which was a few weeks’ old, was taken to the workhouse and baptised a Catholic. The police are investigating the matter.

Harvest prospects

The cold and somewhat harsh weather in late June followed by the practically general drought in July has unfavourably affected crops and stock.

Though cereals have on the whole done well, the drought has caused the straw, notably in the case of oats, to be short, and in some parts of the country the grain heads have not filled properly.

Flax, too, though in a fair crop, is likely to be short, and in some parts of the North it is anticipated that it will be difficult to find water for retting purposes.

Potatoes have wanted rain, but the cases of blight reported are less numerous, especially in the North, than last year. As a result of the drought, pastures are becoming bare, and stock accordingly in some parts of the country are falling off in condition.

Farmers organise

A meeting of farmers took place in Portumna on Friday to discuss a proposal to form a local branch of the Co. Galway Association of the Irish Farmers’ Union.

Mr. B. Geoghegan, the county organiser in addressing the meeting, explained the aims of the association and pointed out the great possibilities of co-operation among farmers.

All those present were completely in favour of the proposal and formed a branch on the spot, the members of which are very keen to induce every farmer in the district to join.

Another meeting will shortly be held for the purpose of selecting a chairman and secretary.

A month for begging

For begging on the footpath leading to the railway station, Patrick Reilly, of no fixed residence, was ordered to be imprisoned for a month when charged at Galway Petty Sessions on Monday.

Sergeant Duffy, who had summoned him, said he was obstructing people going to the railway station. He was an old offender.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City  and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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1919

Roads in good shape

The quarterly meeting of the Clifden District Council was held on Wednesday. Mr. E. J. King, J.P., Co.C., Chairman, in the chair.

The County Surveyor reported that all the roads in the district under the direct labour scheme were well maintained during the quarter, and the supply of winter material was making good progress.

Mr. P. H. Conroy referred to the flooding of the road near Kylemore iron bridge, and the Co. Surveyor stated that he was in communication with the owners with reference to the deepening of the river.

With reference to the unexpended balance on the Carna-Recess road, the Co. Surveyor stated that this money was now available for expenditure and that he had suggested a scheme to the Council at their previous meeting and he would be glad to have their views on the matter.

Chairman: I think it would be most unwise to spend this money on a road on which there is not much traffic. This money, I understand, I s earmarked for the Clifden district as we contributed half the cost for the Carna Road. There are several other urgent works. For instance, the Cleggan road, and the road to the Marconi Station, and you all know the cast amount of traffic that is on these roads.

In the Brit’s court

I am convinced that the Irish question cannot be further advanced by prolonged discussion. The subject has literally been “talked out”, and it is clear to all who care to see that irreparable mischief may be done by retaining the open sore on the very threshold of the centre of the British Empire.

That the time for prompt and courageous and clear-visioned action has come is agreed by all men of good-will who are eager to see this thorny problem removed from the path.

Therefore, the next move lies with British Statesmanship. Should the politicians have to confess defeat after the coming attempt at settlement, British democracy can have no further use for them, for they will have failed to fulfil that it expects and they will have struck a reeling blow at British prestige in the eyes of America and the world.

Stunned by lightening

On last Friday week there was severe lightening in parts of Moycullen. Portion of a field in Ballinahallin was torn up, and two boys were stunned for some time by a flash. Heavy rain fell.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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1919

Doctors’ fees

Mr. P. Claffey presided at the weekly meeting of the Ballinasloe Board of Guardians held on Saturday. There also attended: Messrs. T.J. Dolan, M. Loughnane, M.N. Noctor, M. Cahill, and M.P. Kelly.

Medical Officers of the Union wrote asking for fifty per cent. increase in their fees for temporary duty.

Mr. Ryan he saw the Doctors’ Union had decided to charge £10 10s. for union and dispensary work. He considered the doctors’ demand reasonable.

Mr. Loughnane: What is the use of guardians coming in here at all if the officials are to dictate to them?

Mr. Ryan: When these doctors join the Union they will have to get bigger fees. The demand is reasonable.

Mr. Loughnane: I’m sure it is unreasonable. The board treated its medical officers not alone generous but liberal. – Mr. Ryan: I saw it in Athlone.

Mr. Loughnane: We don’t want to hear about Athlone.

Mr. Ryan: You must listen to reason. Do you see anything now for the same price as four years ago?

Mr. Loughnane: Yes and less.

Mr. Mitchell: If the doctors join the Union they will have to get more.

Mr. Loughnane: There is nothing threatened on us but Unions. It is very hard on the ratepayers to meet all. Let us stick to our original decision.

Mr. Ryan: I propose we put it on the agenda for next meeting.

Chairman: When it came up here before, I voted for £5 5s. per week, but there is no use in making laws one day and breaking them another.

Mr. Loughnane: They have their private practice, and very few red tickets I ever got. – Mr Ryan: You cannot expect a man to live on what he had four or five years ago.

– It was decided to consider the matter on that day fortnight.

Improved service

We learn that demobilisation of the various Army and Navy and auxiliary services has enabled the Post Office (in England) to introduce a much more efficient service.

We know that the railways and post offices in Ireland, under the control of a foreign State, are still working with a war-time shortage of staff and lack of efficiency.

Is it not high time that every public board and corporate authority in the country started senselessly to hammer at the doors of the powers that be in order to bring about the reintroduction of public services that would enable business to be conducted with some degree of despatch and that would once more rescue Irish provincial centres from the isolation in which they were placed under war-time conditions?

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app

The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City  and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

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